Canada probing allegations Azeri forces are using Canadian technology in Nagorno-Karabakh

FILE PHOTO: An aerial view shows a settlement in Martakert province, which according to Armenian media was affected by clashes over the breakaway Nagorno-Karabakh region, April 4, 2016. REUTERS/Davit Abrahamyan

OTTAWA (Reuters) – Canada is probing allegations that Azeri forces involved in fighting with Armenia are using Canadian drone technology that was initially exported to Turkey, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said on Friday.

Project Ploughshares, a Canadian arms control group, says video of air strikes released by the Azeri air force indicates the drones had been equipped with imaging and targeting systems made by L3Harris Wescam, the Canada-based unit of L3Harris Technologies LHX.N.

The Globe and Mail newspaper said the firm had received permission earlier this year to ship seven imaging and targeting systems to Turkish drone maker Baykar. Turkey is a key ally of Azerbaijan, whose forces have been fighting for a week over the disputed enclave of

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‘Uneven and Unpredictable’ Tech Labor Recovery

The latest CompTIA data analysis shows continued mixed signals for tech-related jobs with companies adding 12,900 technical and non-technical workers in September.

The latest data from the monthly U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Employment Situation report confirms a recovery that remains uneven and unpredictable. The CompTIA data analysis shows a mix of good news in IT sector employment gains and disappointing news in IT occupation job losses.

The tech sector recorded its second consecutive month of employment growth. The IT services and custom software development category led the way in job gains. There was also positive growth in tech manufacturing and the information services category.

Tech companies added about 9,200 new workers in August.

Massive Tech Occupation Job Losses

The industry’s employment growth was countered by an unexpected loss of 324,000 tech occupation jobs. Those span all industry sectors across the economy.

CompTIA's Tim Herbert

CompTIA’s Tim Herbert

“The latest jobs report confirms

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Trump seemed to defy the laws of science and disease. Then, the coronavirus caught up with him.

On the campaign trail, Trump’s sons Donald Jr. and Eric have spoken to packed audiences in indoor venues. And the Trump campaign violated state regulations limiting the size of gatherings in Nevada, earning a public rebuke from the governor after the president addressed thousands at an indoor event there last month.

They all took their cues from Trump himself, who has rarely worn masks, sometimes mocked those who did and disputed the advice from his own government’s experts.

While the nation suffered through an unprecedented and fear-filled lockdown, there was a bubble at the top, where Trump’s actions seemed to flout the laws of disease, and to embolden — or coerce — those around him to try it, too.

Asked by The Washington Post’s Bob Woodward earlier this year if he was afraid of catching the virus, he said he wasn’t. “I don’t know why I’m not,” he said, according

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Tunable free-electron X-ray radiation from van der Waals materials — ScienceDaily

Researchers at the Technion — Israel Institute of Technology have developed precise radiation sources that may replace the expensive and cumbersome facilities currently used for such tasks. The suggested apparatus produces controlled radiation with a narrow spectrum that can be tuned with high resolution, at a relatively low energy investment. The findings are likely to lead to breakthroughs in a variety of fields, including the analysis of chemicals and biological materials, medical imaging, X-ray equipment for security screening, and other uses of accurate X-ray sources.

Published in the journal Nature Photonics, the study was led by Professor Ido Kaminer and his master’s student Michael Shentcis as part of a collaboration with several research institutes at the Technion: the Andrew and Erna Viterbi Faculty of Electrical Engineering, the Solid State Institute, the Russell Berrie Nanotechnology Institute (RBNI), and the Helen Diller Center for Quantum Science, Matter and Engineering.

The researchers’

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Diversity training startup lost a client to Trump’s ban, CEO says

  • Paradigm CEO Joelle Emerson said in a tweet Thursday that a recent executive order from the Trump administration banning certain types of diversity training at federal contractors already caused her to lose a a client.
  • Emerson said the type of training her startup provides does not violate the executive order, but that this company ended it just to “play it safe.”
  • She said that other companies are holding off on diversity training altogether because of confusion over the order.
  • Paradigm is especially known for providing training to Silicon Valley startups and big tech firms, which have historically struggled to achieve representation of minorities in their workforces and C-suites.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The CEO of a diversity training consulting firm said Thursday that her company has already lost a client due to President Trump’s recent executive order.

 

“We just lost our

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President Donald Trump’s Twitter could be especially active during his quarantine for coronavirus

The tweet quickly appeared to become his most shared ever, racking up more than 887,000 retweets and 1.6 million likes by late Friday afternoon, according to social media analytics company Tweet Binder and researchers.

“The fact that Donald Trump broke the info on Twitter indicates that this is his mode of choice for communicating with the American people about the most serious things,” said Samuel Woolley, a professor and director of a propaganda research team at the University of Texas at Austin.

Trump has one of the most popular Twitter accounts in the world, with 86.6 million followers. He uses the site to broadcast his thoughts on issues, promote his campaign for presidency and attack his critics. Even as Twitter invoked Trump’s rage earlier this year by slapping fact checks and labels on his tweets, Trump kept tweeting multiple times each day.

That’s unlikely to stop during his quarantine, especially

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The latest on UGA football and basketball games with Georgia Tech and other schedule updates – Sports – Savannah Morning News

ATHENS — Georgia’s football game with Georgia Tech in 2021 will remain as scheduled to be held in Atlanta even with the teams not playing in Athens this year, Bulldogs athletic director Greg McGarity said.

The in-state rivals will not go up against each other this season for the first time since 1924 after the SEC decided to play a conference-only schedule due to the pandemic. The ACC allowed for one nonconference game played in the school’s home state.

“I think if the shoe were on the other foot, it’s not that you push the game back a year, but it would take both schools to agree to do that and obviously Tech has no interest in doing that,” McGarity said. “We’ll just basically be in Atlanta in 2021. It’s unfortunate but it’s just where things stand.”

The Georgia men’s basketball game at Georgia Tech for this season may not

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Preserved Brain Tissue Found in Victim of Ancient Vesuvius Eruption, Scientists Report

Herculaneum, as it appears today.

Herculaneum, as it appears today.
Image: Pier Paolo Petrone

The catastrophic eruption of Mount Vesuvius nearly 2,000 years ago is famous for preserving its many victims in volcanic ash. New research suggests this preservation extends to the cellular level, owing to the apparent discovery of neurons in a victim whose brain was turned to glass during the eruption.

New research published today in PLOS One describes the discovery of neuronal tissue in vitrified brain and spinal cord remains belonging to a victim of the Mount Vesuvius eruption, which blew its stack in 79 CE.

“The discovery of brain tissue in ancient human remains is an unusual event,” Pier Paolo Petrone, a forensic anthropologist at University Federico II in Italy and the lead author of the new study, said in a press release. “But what is extremely rare is the integral preservation of neuronal structures of a 2,000-year-old central nervous

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Stock market news today: Dow, S&P fall on Trump’s COVID-19 test, tech slump

  • US stocks sank on Friday after President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump said they both tested positive for COVID-19.
  • The diagnosis adds more uncertainties to the final month of a presidential race already expected to fuel outsize market volatility.
  • While some sectors pared losses and swung higher, falling tech stocks dragged on major indexes and led the Nasdaq composite to underperform its peers.
  • Investors also faced off against weakening economic data. US businesses added 661,000 nonfarm payrolls in September, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. That’s less than economists’ expectation of 859,000 payrolls.
  • Oil futures continued to slide below the $40 support level. West Texas Intermediate crude dropped as much as 5.4%, to $36.63 per barrel.
  • Watch major indexes update live here.

US equities tumbled on Friday after President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump announced they both tested positive for COVID-19.

Trump was tested late

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The Faculty of Mechanical Engineering at the Technion has set a world record in light enhancement — ScienceDaily

Physical Review X recently reported on a new optical resonator from the Technion — Israel Institute of Technology that is unprecedented in resonance enhancement. Developed by graduate student Jacob Kher-Alden under the supervision of Professor Tal Carmon, the Technion-born resonator has record-breaking capabilities in resonance enhancement.

A resonator is a device that traps waves and enhances or echoes them by reflecting them from wall to wall in a process called resonant enhancement. Today, there are complex and sophisticated resonators of various kinds throughout the world, as well as simple resonators familiar to all of us. Examples of this include the resonator box of a guitar, which enhances the sound produced by the strings, or the body of a flute, which enhances the sound created in the mouthpiece of the instrument.

The guitar and flute are acoustic resonators in which the sound reverberates between the walls of the resonator. In physics,

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