Opinion | The White House coronavirus outbreak shows that testing alone is not enough

But the castle walls were penetrated — presumably by an asymptomatic carrier, a covid-era Trojan horse — and infections among the president’s circle have cascaded out this week. The spotlight is on the Rose Garden reception for Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett, an event attended by nearly all of those who have recently tested positive: the president, first lady, senators, aides.

Per protocol, attendees were tested before they got near the president. But other defenses were down. According to The Post: “After guests tested negative that day they were instructed they no longer needed to cover their faces. The no-mask mantra applied indoors as well. Cabinet members, senators, Barrett family members and others mixed unencumbered at tightly packed, indoor receptions.” No masks, no distancing and time spent among crowds indoors are a recipe for transmission.

All of this underscores the central flaw in the White House’s approach: Testing alone

Read More
Read More

MBA Classroom of the Future: Hologram Professors

McCombs Professor preparing to teach his class in a studio

The COVID-19 pandemic has forced business schools to move classes online and limit campus interactions.

While some b-schools initially announced plans to fully open campuses, many quickly revised those plans and, instead, decided to focus on virtual and hybrid learning models.

One b-school, in particular, has come up with a rather creative solution for the virtual learning environment: Hologram professors.

The McCombs School of Business at The University of Texas at Austin recently announced plans to launch the classroom of the future with a new 3D immersive video solution that projects a professor into the classroom as a hologram. The b-school has partnered with Austin-based Contextual Content Group to create and implement the video solution.

“We knew we could make the digital experience better,” Joe Stephens, senior assistant dean and director of working professional and executive MBA programs at McCombs,

Read More
Read More

Case closed: California judge ends SpaceX’s lawsuit against the U.S. Air Force

The judge said the Air Force’s actions were not arbitrary, capricious, or in violation of the law, and that SpaceX was not entitled to any relief in this action.”

WASHINGTON — A California judge Oct. 2 officially ended SpaceX’s 18-month-long lawsuit against the U.S. Air Force. Following a Sept. 24 ruling denying SpaceX’s claim, the judge on Friday ordered the case to be closed. 

U.S. District Court Judge Judge Otis Wright II of the Central District of California on Sept. 24 ruled against SpaceX in its legal complaint over contracts the U.S. Air Force awarded in October 2018 to United Launch Alliance, Northrop Grumman and Blue Origin. 

The judge’s Sept. 24 order, first reported by Reuters, was sealed by the court because it contained sensitive information.

In the Oct. 2 motion to close the case, the judge noted that his Sept. 24 order denied SpaceX’s claim, “concluding that the

Read More
Read More

YouTube 4K has now come to Apple TV, iPhone and iPad, but no HDR or 60fps on TV

“A big frustration with the Apple TV 4K is about to be history,” my colleague Chris Welch wrote, when we learned that Apple’s premiere set-top box would finally be able play 4K YouTube videos at their native resolution instead of being stuck at 1080p. These days, even a $40 dongle can do better than that.

But though Apple’s latest software updates did bring YouTube 4K to the Apple TV 4K, the frustrations aren’t necessarily over. It turns out you’re limited to watching 4K at 30fps, instead of a smooth 60 frames per second, and without the depth of color and contrast that High Dynamic Range (HDR) provides. That’s what 9to5Mac noticed yesterday, and we’ve confirmed with Google that — for now — Apple TV only supports 4K at 30fps with SDR content.

On the plus side, the latest iPhones and iPads do

Read More
Read More

The Quantum Internet Will Blow Your Mind. Here’s What It Will Look Like

This article appeared in the November 2020 issue of Discover magazine as “The Quest for a Quantum Internet.” Subscribe for more stories like these.


Call it the quantum Garden of Eden. Fifty or so miles east of New York City, on the campus of Brookhaven National Laboratory, Eden Figueroa is one of the world’s pioneering gardeners planting the seeds of a quantum internet. Capable of sending enormous amounts of data over vast distances, it would work not just faster than the current internet but faster than the speed of light — instantaneously, in fact, like the teleportation of Mr. Spock and Captain Kirk in Star Trek.

Sitting in Brookhaven’s light-filled cafeteria, his shoulder-length black hair fighting to free itself from the clutches of a ponytail, Figueroa — a Mexico native who is an associate professor at Stony Brook University — tries to explain how it will work. He grabs

Read More
Read More

Scientists repeat century-old study to reveal evidence of evolutionary rescue in the wild — ScienceDaily

A tiny flatworm found commonly on the coasts of western Europe and North America is living proof that species may be able to evolve and adapt to rapid climate change.

Research by the University of Plymouth examined the extent to which the intertidal flatworm Procerodes littoralis was able to regenerate and repair itself when challenged with different sea water conditions.

Repeating a study conducted more than a century earlier it was shown that the response of individuals had changed markedly since then.

The original study was conducted by Dorothy Jordan Lloyd, who was based at the Marine Biological Association in Plymouth, and focussed on individuals found in Wembury Bay, Plymouth.

It was published in 1914, and the current study — led by BSc (Hons) Marine Biology graduate Katharine Clayton — replicated it in terms of the processes followed and the precise locations from which samples were collected.

When tested across

Read More
Read More

Encrypted USB flash drive you can unlock with your smartphone (or Apple Watch)

There are a lot of encrypted USB flash drives out there. You plug them in, and either there’s an on-screen popup that asks for your passcode, or some sort of physical keypad that is used to gain access.

But what about transferring the unlocking mechanism to another device — such as a smartphone, or your Apple Watch?

This is exactly what the iStorage datAshur BT hardware encrypted USB flash drive does.

Must read: iOS 14.0.1: The battery and connectivity woes continue

Visually, the iStorage datAshur BT looks like any other USB flash drive. A very high quality one — the exterior looks like it is made from polished obsidian. In reality, I think it is an epoxy. It’s tough, gives the drive a water- and dust-resistant rating of IP57 (protected against damage from dust ingress, and water resistant to 1 meter), and there’s a cap that protects the USB-A business

Read More
Read More

NASA launches new $23 million space toilet to ISS. It should arrive Monday

A recently designed space toilet that better accommodates women is headed to the International Space Station. The new loo was packed inside a cargo ship that successfully blasted off Friday evening at 6:16 p.m. PT from  NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility on Wallops Island, Virginia. The astronauts will give the toilet a test run for the next few months.



This unusual-looking space toilet will be tested by the astronauts on ISS. NASA


© Provided by CNET
This unusual-looking space toilet will be tested by the astronauts on ISS. NASA



Astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti shows off the hose on the current toilet for when you need to pee. 


© Video screenshot by Bonnie Burton/CNET

Astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti shows off the hose on the current toilet for when you need to pee. 


Weighing almost 100 pounds (45 kilograms) and measuring 28 inches (71 centimeters) tall, the new toilet is about half as big as the two Russian-built toilets already in use at the ISS. This new toilet is 65% smaller and almost half as light than current ISS toilets in use.

The new, smaller

Read More
Read More

The Origins of Bolshevism – World Socialist Web Site

Vladmir Lenin

The Bolshevik tendency emerged out of the struggle led politically by Lenin (and, in the sphere of philosophy, by Plekhanov) against revisionist and opportunist tendencies within the Russian Social Democratic Labor Party. Lenin (basing himself on the position developed earlier by Kautsky, the principal theoretician of the SPD) insisted that socialist consciousness did not develop spontaneously within the working class, but had to be brought into the workers’ movement. In his seminal work, What Is To Be Done? Lenin cited the following critical passage from the program of the Austrian Social-Democratic Party:

…Modern socialist consciousness can only arise on the basis of profound scientific knowledge. Indeed, modern economic science is as much a condition for socialist production as, say, modern technology, and the proletariat can create neither the one nor the other, no matter how much it may desire to do so; both arise out of the modern

Read More
Read More

Google Discontinues The Daydream VR Headset

Google’s mobile-focused virtual reality platform is no longer officially supported by the company. The company confirmed that it will no longer be updating the Daydream software, and it will also no longer sell the Daydream View mobile headset.

Google has slowed down Daydream for a while. There was no mention of Daydream at the company’s I/O 2018 developers conference nor its hardware event last year. “There hasn’t been the broad consumer or developer adoption we had hoped, and we’ve seen decreasing usage over time of the Daydream View headset,” a spokesperson said. Although the system had potential, “we noticed some clear limitations constraining smartphone VR from being a viable long-term solution,” said the spokesperson. “Most notably, asking people to put their phone in a headset and lose access to the apps they use throughout the day causes immense friction.”

Google launched the Daydream View alongside the first Pixel phone in

Read More
Read More