Silk fibers improve bioink for 3D-printed artificial tissues and organs — ScienceDaily

How do you test, in early-stage research, whether a potential pharmaceutical effectively targets a human tumor, organ, or some other part of the body? How do you grow a new hand or some other body part? Researchers are in the early stages of using 3D cell printing technology to make developments like these happen. A standard way — currently unavailable — to fix the cells in place after printing would help researchers avoid having to ‘reinvent the wheel’ in every new investigation.

In a study recently published in Materials Today Bio, researchers from Osaka University have used silk nanofibers obtained by mechanical disintegration to enhance the printing process without damaging the cells or cell assemblies. An attractive point of silk for this application is that silk is believed to be a safe material for humans. This development will help bring 3D cell printing research out of the laboratory and

Read More
Read More

NASA turns to 3D-printed construction for outer space infrastructure

Taking its name from the mythological home of the gods, an Austin, Texas startup firm is focusing its unique methods of housebuilding in a team-up with NASA for an expansive space-based construction system that will deliver a wide array of landing pads, storage facilities, fuel depots, access roads, laboratories, and living habitats for missions to the Moon and Mars.

ICON is mostly known for its proficiency at creating 3D-printed houses on Earth and will now extend their expertise in this arena with the launch of Project Olympus, an ambitious effort to develop needed infrastructure as humanity ventures forth from the planet and begins to establish permanent bases and sustained scientific programs off-world.

“Building humanity’s first home on another world will be the most ambitious construction project in human history and will push science, engineering, technology, and architecture to literal new heights,” said Jason Ballard, co-founder and CEO of ICON. “NASA’s

Read More
Read More

Bjarke Ingels Group Helps Pioneer Technology for 3D-Printed Buildings on the Moon

For centuries, humans have dreamed about what life might look like on the moon, from flying chariots to self-burying modules. And even though it’s been 50 years since the first lunar landing, and entities from SpaceX to Space Force have entered the picture, we’re still dreaming, it would seem. Today, architecture firm Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG), construction start-up ICON, and design firm SEArch+ have unveiled a project that might provide one more small step for man in this endeavor. The research initiative, called Project Olympus, will investigate and develop a method to 3D-print structures on the moon using what is effectively lunar dust as its primary material.

If successful, Project Olympus (which has received funding through a Small Business Innovation Research grant through the U.S. Air Force, $1.8 million of which is from NASA) could pave the way for a permanent habitat on the moon. The design team hopes its

Read More
Read More

3D-printed nasal swabs work as well as commercial swabs for COVID-19 diagnostic testing, study finds — ScienceDaily

As COVID-19 quickly spread worldwide this spring, shortages of supplies, including the nasopharyngeal (nasal) swabs used to collect viral samples, limited diagnostic testing.

Now, a multisite clinical trial led by the University of South Florida Health (USF Health) Morsani College of Medicine and its primary hospital affiliate Tampa General Hospital (TGH) provides the first evidence that 3D-printed alternative nasal swabs work as well, and safely, as the standard synthetic flocked nasal swabs.

The results were published online Sept. 10 in Clinical Infectious Diseases. A commentary accompanying the paper cites the authors’ timely, collaborative response to supply chain disruptions affecting testing capacity early in the pandemic.

Seeking a solution to an unprecedented demand for nasal swabs at their own institution and others, USF Health researchers in the Departments of Radiology and Infectious Diseases reached out to colleagues at TGH; Northwell Health, New York’s largest health care provider; and leading 3D-printer

Read More
Read More