Early Mammals Acted More Like Reptiles, Says Study

KEY POINTS

  • Scientists said early mammals led a less active but much longer lives
  • They analyzed teeth fossils of earliest mammals, the Morganucodon and Kuehneotherium
  • The study suggested that mammals developed some characteristics like warm-bloodedness at a later period

The first mammals that roamed the Earth millions of years ago functioned and acted more like reptiles even with their already advanced body structures, a new study showed. 

The research, published in Nature Communications, suggested there might be an overlap between warm-bloodedness and cold-bloodedness as mammals evolved in the past. It may be noted that mammals are considered as warm-blooded animals while reptiles are cold-blooded. 

As part of the study, a team of paleontologists analyzed teeth fossils from two of the earliest mammals, the Morganucodon and Kuehneotherium, which lived alongside early dinosaurs nearly 200 million years ago. This was the first time researchers used powerful X-rays to examine ancient fossils.

The

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