As atmospheric carbon rises, so do rivers, adding to flooding

flood
Credit: CC0 Public Domain

When it comes to climate change, relationships are everything. That’s a key takeaway of a new UO study that examines the interaction between plants, atmospheric carbon dioxide and rising water levels in the Mississippi River.


Published recently in the Geological Society of America’s journal GSA Today, the study compared historical atmospheric carbon data against observations of herbarium leaf specimens to quantify the relationship between rising carbon levels and increasingly catastrophic floods in the American Midwest.

Using data covering more than two centuries, researchers demonstrated that as carbon levels in the atmosphere have risen due to the burning of fossil fuels, the ability of plants to absorb water from the air has decreased. That means more rainfall makes its way into rivers and streams, adding to their potential for damaging floods.

Co-authored by UO Museum of Natural and Cultural History geologist Greg Retallack and earth sciences

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Facebook will fight QAnon by adding ‘credible’ info to #savethechildren hashtag

Facebook is taking additional steps to restrict militia movements and the QAnon conspiracy movement. The company will reject ads that “praise, support or represent militarized social movements,” including militias and anarchist groups as well as QAnon. It will also start linking to “credible child safety resources” when people look up child safety-related hashtags like #savethechildren, which has been coopted by QAnon adherents.

The new changes codify policies Facebook has previously taken steps toward. The update follows an August crackdown on QAnon and other social movements that celebrate violence, as well as criticism over Facebook’s failure to remove a militia event page before a shooting in Kenosha, Wisconsin. Facebook removed 900 pages and 1,500 ads in August, and it reduced the visibility of around 2,000 groups. It’s now placing those groups’ content lower in followers’ news feeds.

“Starting today, we will direct people

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Windows 10 Is Adding a Task Manager Dedicated to Gaming

Windows 10 is adding a Task Manager widget within the Xbox Game Bar to help you manage your computer’s resources without leaving a game.As spotted by WindowsCentral, the new ‘Resources’ widget lets you monitor which programs are causing the most strain on your computer, assess why your in-game performance may be hitching and close programs quickly without tabbing out. You’ll also be able to see how much load there is on your CPU, RAM, DISK and GPU, much like the traditional Task Manager application. It’s a neat timesaver that means you won’t have to alt-tab or hit CTRL+ALT+DELETE so often to figure out your in-game issues.

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The Windows 10 Task Manager Bar in action.

You can get access to the feature right now by enrolling in the Game Bar – SDK Development app within the Xbox Insider Hub on Windows 10. The Xbox Insider Hub allows Windows and Xbox users

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