Advisors use technology to handle challenge in helping clients adjust to the new environment

  • Financial advisory firms have had to adapt using virtual technologies to keep their meetings going with clients.
  • Their newfound comfort with tech will probably change advisory practices well into the future.
  • Top-ranked firms in the 2020 CNBC FA 100 list weigh in on how technology has transformed their businesses.



Abby Phon sitting at a desk in front of a laptop computer


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The Covid-19 pandemic has pushed more financial advisors to figure out how to meet virtually with clients.

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Advisory firms have had to find ways to be able to adapt through the use of virtual technologies to keep their meetings going with clients. That newfound comfort will probably change advisory practices well into the future.

To that point, the first Zoom video meeting that the advisors at Salem Investment Counselors had earlier this year to discuss financial markets was not a resounding success.

“We spent half the time troubleshooting people’s connections, and then it shut down

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Advisors use technology to help clients adjust to the new environment

Luis Alvarez | DigitalVision | Getty Images

The Covid-19 pandemic has pushed more financial advisors to figure out how to meet virtually with clients.

Advisory firms have had to find ways to be able to adapt through the use of virtual technologies to keep their meetings going with clients. That newfound comfort will probably change advisory practices well into the future.

To that point, the first Zoom video meeting that the advisors at Salem Investment Counselors had earlier this year to discuss financial markets was not a resounding success.

“We spent half the time troubleshooting people’s connections, and then it shut down after a half-hour,” said Kip Keener, chief compliance officer for the Winston-Salem, North Carolina-based firm. Salem was ranked No. 1 on CNBC’s FA 100 ranking this year.

Keener immediately switched to a corporate Zoom account and says that videoconferencing between employees and with clients has quickly become an

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Radiator-like fluid systems adjust the genetic wiring inside human liver cells in preliminary work toward artificial organ-tissue engineering — ScienceDaily

Bioengineers are devising a hot new technology to remotely control the positioning and timing of cell functions to build 3-dimensional, artificial, living tissues.

The labs of Kelly Stevens at the UW Medicine Institute of Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine in Seattle, and Jordan Miller at Rice University in Houston, are collaborating to develop bio-printed, organ-like tissues, such as liver and lung constructs.

The Steven’s lab has the long-term vision of building liver tissues that simulate some of the many, complex functions of the organ. Those artificial tissues could be used to study, for example, how drugs or toxins act on the liver.

This vital organ is prone to damage from infections, medications, poisons, and common intoxicants, like alcohol. Liver disease affects more than 500 million people worldwide and accounts for more than 2 million deaths each year.

Eventually, researchers would like to be able engineer artificial tissues that could be

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