Quality research in Africa matters more than ever — for the whole world

We are at a unique moment in history. Two particular, ongoing events stand out. COVID-19 is one. The other is a long-overdue recognition of inequities among people in the US and worldwide, as exemplified by the Black Lives Matter movement. These issues provide a useful, timely lens through which to consider the role and value of African research.

There are many levels on which the future of the world, not just Africa’s, rests on African research. First, Africa represents the youngest and fastest growing population in the world. This makes intellectual investment an imperative, to harness talent that is a significant and growing share of the global population.

Second, Africans represent the oldest and most diverse genome in the world. Human genetics research has the potential to reveal some of the small differences in our genes that are influential in determining what makes Africa more susceptible or resistant to certain

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Oldest monkey fossils outside of Africa found — ScienceDaily

Three fossils found in a lignite mine in southeastern Yunan Province, China, are about 6.4 million years old, indicate monkeys existed in Asia at the same time as apes, and are probably the ancestors of some of the modern monkeys in the area, according to an international team of researchers.

“This is significant because they are some of the very oldest fossils of monkeys outside of Africa,” said Nina G. Jablonski, Evan Pugh University Professor of Anthropology, Penn State. “It is close to or actually the ancestor of many of the living monkeys of East Asia. One of the interesting things from the perspective of paleontology is that this monkey occurs at the same place and same time as ancient apes in Asia.”

The researchers, who included Jablonski and long-time collaborator Xueping Ji, department of paleoanthropology, Yunnan Institute of Cultural Relics and Archaeology, Kunming, China, studied the fossils unearthed from

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Study shows how climate impacts food webs, poses socioeconomic threat in Eastern Africa

Study shows how climate impacts food webs, poses socioeconomic threat in Eastern Africa
The research team spent 12 days on Lake Tanganyika collecting core samples from the lake’s floor. They chartered a Congolese merchant vessel, seen here, and adapted it for their research project. Credit: Michael McGlue, University of Kentucky

A new study is sounding the alarm on the impact climate change could have on one of the world’s most vulnerable regions.


Michael McGlue, Pioneer Natural Resources Professor of Stratigraphy in the University of Kentucky Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, and his team conducted the study at Lake Tanganyika—a major African fishery. The results, which published today in Science Advances, show how certain changes in climate may place the fishery at risk, potentially diminishing food resources for millions of people in this area of eastern Africa.

“Lake Tanganyika’s fish are a critically important resource for impoverished people from four nations (Tanzania, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Burundi and Zambia) and resilience

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HIV and lung cancer in East Africa: CWRU and UH secure research funds

Cleveland–Researchers with the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center (UHCMC) have secured $4 million in funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH)/National Cancer Institute (NCI) to establish an HIV-associated Malignancy Research Center (HAMRC) focused on lung cancer in East Africa.

The team will collaborate with Ugandan and Tanzanian researchers at the Joint Clinical Research Centre in Kampala, Makerere University Lung Institute, Uganda Cancer Institute, Mulago National Hospital, National Institute for Medical Research (NIMR), Muhumbili National Hospital and the Ocean Road Cancer Institute. The HAMRC will investigate novel approaches to characterize lung cancer epidemiology, somatic mutation burden, HIV and accelerated aging, and radiological features of lung cancer and the relationship to HIV-1 infection.

The focus of this new research center includes establishing national lung cancer diagnostic referral networks in Uganda and Tanzania, teleradiology telepathology, technology transference and training of early career investigators and

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Strengthening Science, Technology and Innovation Systems for Sustainable Development in Africa

On 7 October 2020, UNESCO, represented by Mr. Jean-Yves Le Saux, Director of the Bureau of Strategic Planning, and Sweden, represented by Mr Mikael Schultz, Deputy Permanent Delegate of Sweden to UNESCO, signed a pathbreaking agreement to support science, technology and innovation in Africa. Shamila Nair-Bedouelle, Assistant Director General for the Natural Science Sector and Magnus Magnusson, representing Gabriela Ramos, Assistant Director General for the Social and Human Science Sector, Pia Engstrand, Sida’s focal point for UNESCO (through virtual connection) were also present at the ceremony and will jointly oversee the implementation of this initiative.

The Swedish International Development Agency (Sida) will provide funding in the amount of 25 million Swedish kronor over two years (2020-2022) to support the first phase of a major initiative within UNESCO’s global framework for monitoring, policy support and advocacy for the Recommendation on Science and Scientific Researchers, adopted by the General Conference in 2017.

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The best company in South Africa to build a smartphone app for your company

Many South African companies are looking to improve their operations through mobile apps, but it can be a daunting task to design and build a world-class app.

Good news is that there is a company which specializes in Android and iOS app development which can help – Codehesion.

Codehesion is South Africa’s top mobile app developer and has helped many companies launch their own apps.

Codehesion takes care of everything when providing a business with a new smartphone app, including the planning, design, build, and launch.

Their app developers also help with the strategy around the app, provide advice on which features to include, and list the app on the Android and iOS app stores.

Additionally, Codehesion CEO Hector Beyers said their experience helps them guide clients on which type of app will work best for their business.

Risk-free consultation

Codehesion offers South African businesses a free and easy

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Africa Wildlife Tracking Leverages ORBCOMM’s Satellite IoT Technology to Support Conservation Efforts Around the World

ORBCOMM and Africa Wildlife Tracking (AWT) in Action

AWT is leveraging ORBCOMM’s advanced satellite IoT technology to track and monitor animals of all sizes to support their conservation efforts.
AWT is leveraging ORBCOMM’s advanced satellite IoT technology to track and monitor animals of all sizes to support their conservation efforts.
AWT is leveraging ORBCOMM’s advanced satellite IoT technology to track and monitor animals of all sizes to support their conservation efforts.

Tracking and monitoring solutions help reduce poaching, protect endangered wildlife and deliver valuable insights into animal behavior for researchers and conservationists

ROCHELLE PARK, N.J., Oct. 07, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — ORBCOMM Inc. (Nasdaq: ORBC), a global provider of Internet of Things (IoT) solutions, today announced that Africa Wildlife Tracking (AWT), the leader in tracking wildlife, is leveraging ORBCOMM’s advanced satellite IoT technology to track and monitor animals of all sizes to support their conservation efforts. With the added threat of the COVID-19 pandemic and the need to supply local populations with food, poaching is likely to increase, making

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Discovery of diamonds in small rock sample hints at possibility of new deposits in area similar to world’s richest gold mine in South Africa — ScienceDaily

The presence of diamonds in an outcrop atop an unrealized gold deposit in Canada’s Far North mirrors the association found above the world’s richest gold mine, according to University of Alberta research that fills in blanks about the thermal conditions of Earth’s crust three billion years ago.

“The diamonds we have found so far are small and not economic, but they occur in ancient sediments that are an exact analog of the world’s biggest gold deposit — the Witwatersrand Goldfields of South Africa, which has produced more than 40 per cent of the gold ever mined on Earth,” said Graham Pearson, researcher in the Faculty of Science and Canada Excellence Research Chair Laureate in Arctic Resources.

“Diamonds and gold are very strange bedfellows. They hardly ever appear in the same rock, so this new find may help to sweeten the attractiveness of the original gold discovery if we can find

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India and South Africa Ask WTO to Waive Rules to Aid COVID-19 Drug Production | World News

VIENNA (Reuters) – India and South Africa want the World Trade Organization (WTO) to waive intellectual property rules to make it easier for developing countries to produce or import COVID-19 drugs, a letter https://docs.wto.org/dol2fe/Pages/SS/directdoc.aspx?filename=q:/IP/C/W669.pdf&Open=True to the WTO shows.

In their letter dated Oct. 2 the two countries called on the global trade body to waive parts of the Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS), which governs patents, trademarks, copyright and other intellectual property rules globally.

“As new diagnostics, therapeutics and vaccines for COVID-19 are developed, there are significant concerns (over) how these will be made available promptly, in sufficient quantities and at (an) affordable price to meet global demand,” the letter posted on the Geneva-based WTO’s website says.

The two countries said that developing nations are disproportionately affected by the pandemic and that intellectual property rights, including patents, could be a barrier to the provision of affordable

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India, South Africa ask WTO to ease IP rules for COVID-19

South Africa and India have asked the World Trade Organization to waive some provisions in the international agreements that regulate intellectual property rights to speed up efforts to prevent, treat and contain the COVID-19 pandemic

NEW DELHI — South Africa and India have asked the World Trade Organization to waive some provisions in the international agreements that regulate intellectual property rights, to speed up efforts to prevent, treat and contain the COVID-19 pandemic and make sure developing countries are not left behind.

The countries argue, in a joint submission to the Council for Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights dated Friday, that without a rapid waiver of some existing safeguards for intellectual property rights, some countries — particularly developing ones that have been “disproportionately

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