Body Camera Footage Shows Detailed Aftermath of Breonna Taylor’s Killing

Body camera footage from the night Breonna Taylor was killed has been released by the Louisville Metro Police Department, CBS News reports. The footage raises questions about why Taylor’s home was targeted. 

More than 250 videos and over 4,000 pages of documents were released on Wednesday, one of which shows Taylor’s boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, outside the home after she had been shot telling the police that his partner had died. 

“Who else is in the apartment?” an officer asks Walker. “Nobody,” he replied. “My girlfriend’s dead.”

The SWAT team then enters the home and designates the residence a crime scene. One officer is then heard saying “We have to be mindful of what we say, we are on camera now.” After checking Taylor’s pulse, a member of the SWAT team can be heard saying “she’s done,” per TMZ. The outlet also points out that the graphic video shows “bloodstains on

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The Technology 202: Facebook’s new ad limits highlight pressure to prepare for chaotic election aftermath

The social network says the move is intended to limit misinformation and abuse of its service, following broad criticism that it has not done enough to stamp out falsehoods on its platform. Facebook hasn’t said how long the ad suspension will last, but in an internal memo to its sales staff that was obtained by the Washington Post, executives told staff to tell advertisers the ban would last a week.

The changes less than a month before Election Day underscore how tech companies are scrambling to address a fast-changing political environment. 

Tech companies have been making key changes to rein in disinformation since Russia used their platforms in 2016 to divide and sow discord among Americans. But critics say many of those steps to limit foreign influence haven’t gone far enough to address disinformation emanating from within the United States – often from the megaphone of the president. 

Social media

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The Technology 202: Social networks scramble to address the aftermath of first presidential debate

The social network said it took down the accounts based on intelligence provided by the FBI. Twitter shared some examples of the tweets, which the company said “did not make an impact on the public conversation” and had very low engagement:

The activity indicates that social networks are in for a rocky ride for the remainder of election season. 

Tech companies have been revamping their policies and aggressively hiring to address such campaigns in the wake of Russian interference on their platforms surrounding the 2016 election. Yet the companies remain exceptionally vulnerable to a range of evolving and expanding forces that could undermine the election. 

The first presidential debate also sparked an onslaught of extremism and misinformation online. And this is just the beginning: The companies have to contend with three more debate nights as well as a high-stakes Election Day and the delicate post-election period, which might be

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Facebook prepares for a potentially ‘chaotic’ election aftermath

Clegg didn’t offer specifics on the plans, or what might trigger these “break-glass options.” But he suggested that the company might consider “pretty exceptional measures to significantly restrict the circulation of content on our platform.” He pointed out the company has taken such steps in other countries in the past, including Sri Lanka and Myanmar (where Facebook’s early inaction against hate speech has been credited with inflaming tensions that resulted in genocide). 

Separately, another source told the paper that the social network is considering “about 70” scenarios, and that it’s working with “world-class military scenario planners.” Clegg, Sheryl Sandberg and Mark Zuckerberg would be among the executives deciding when to put these plans in motion. 

Facebook has been repeatedly criticized for not acting quickly enough to fight disinformation on its platform. The company has been battling a wave of rumors and misinformation about the coronavirus pandemic, which is expected to

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