The new line of attack on climate science in the age of megafires

Every morning, wildland firefighters gather around radios to listen to the weather forecast. This summer, I was part of the team that fought a fire near Big Sur. When I heard the staticky voice announce that temperatures would exceed 105 degrees, the forecast sounded like a death sentence.



a close up of clouds in front of a sunset: The August Complex fire burns near Lake Pillsbury in the Mendocino National Forest on Sept. 16. By Oct. 5, it had burned more than 1 million acres. (Noah Berger/Associated Press )


© (Noah Berger / Associated Press)
The August Complex fire burns near Lake Pillsbury in the Mendocino National Forest on Sept. 16. By Oct. 5, it had burned more than 1 million acres. (Noah Berger/Associated Press )

Across California, unprecedented heat has made wildfires more difficult to predict and control. During the heat wave in Big Sur, the fire, which had been 40% contained at 30,000 acres, tripled in size in a matter of days. It has now burned nearly 125,000 acres.

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Fighting wildfire involves hauling heavy packs and tools up mountains. Record heat makes this work more difficult and

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10 Essential Leadership Qualities For The Age Of Artificial Intelligence

AI and automation will change the very nature of work. It’s really important that leaders don’t ignore this AI- and data-driven revolution – what I call the “intelligence revolution” – or allow other leaders in the organization to ignore it. Working out how to use AI, dealing with people-related challenges, avoiding the ethical pitfalls of AI, making sure you have the right technology in place, and so on – all are key considerations for the business leaders of today and tomorrow.

This technology revolution will change what it means to be a good leader. It makes sense, then, that business leaders in the intelligence revolution will need to adapt. The way we run businesses will change, and the successful leaders of the future will need a slightly different skillset from the traditional skills associated with leaders.

What sort

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Bill Gates Learned at an Early Age This Lesson That Takes Most People a Lifetime. Some People Never Do

You can say what you want about Bill Gates, but it would be hard to argue that he hasn’t experienced success. He’s one of the wealthiest people on earth, having co-founded one of the world’s most valuable companies. He now spends his time giving away all of that money to causes like eradicating polio. His is not a bad resume. 

A lot of that accomplishment comes from a simple lesson Bill Gates learned early on in his life. I think it’s worth looking at, especially since it’s something many people take a lifetime to learn, if they ever do at all.

Most of us assume that it is, which means everything that isn’t success must be failure. But the opposite of success isn’t failure. Or, it doesn’t have to be. And, that’s a distinction that can make all the difference. Unfortunately, it’s one that many people never learn to make.

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Dave Robertson dies at age 69

Dave Robertson appeared on 5 On Your Side as a political analyst from 2000 to 2018

ST. LOUIS — A longtime 5 On Your Side political analyst and University of Missouri-St. Louis professor has died.

Dave Robertson, a Curators’ Distinguished Teaching Professor Emeritus in the Department of Political Science at the University of Missouri–St. Louis, died on Oct. 7, from complications of pancreatic cancer. He was 69 years old.

He was a nationally recognized scholar of American political development. Robertson appeared on 5 On Your Side as an analyst from 2000 to 2018.

Robertson was a beloved teacher throughout his 37 years at UMSL. A release from the university said he inspired thousands of undergraduates in the introductory American government course, fostered hundreds of baccalaureates in his advanced courses on environmental policy and federalism, and nurtured tens of doctoral students. Among his many career honors were the Governor’s Award for

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A Look At The Innovators Driving Education Change In An Age Of Political Paralysis

While the political cyclone of 2020 continues to suck the air out of the proverbial room, the world of education innovation continues to engage in the all important task of responding to and iterating for the challenges of education worldwide. It’s astounding and inspiring to convene with the best in class entrepreneurs whose work is not only making a difference, but can help you forget the insanity we live in today. 

It’s hard to believe, but I had the chance to attend one such convening just last month, in Italy, no less! In full disclosure, the US-Italia Ed Innovation Festival, was the brainchild of my organization.  Our “modest” goal was to create a new education renaissance, so we set out to do so with this unique hybrid event. What’s most remarkable and

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Data indicates 61 percent of patients who used cannabis began after age 60 — ScienceDaily

With growing interest in its potential health benefits and new legislation favoring legalization in more states, cannabis use is becoming more common among older adults.

University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers report that older adults use cannabis primarily for medical purposes to treat a variety of common health conditions, including pain, sleep disturbances and psychiatric conditions like anxiety and depression.

The study, published online October 7, 2020 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, found that of 568 patients surveyed, 15 percent had used cannabis within the past three years, with half of users reporting using it regularly and mostly for medical purposes.

“Pain, insomnia and anxiety were the most common reasons for cannabis use and, for the most part, patients reported that cannabis was helping to address these issues, especially with insomnia and pain,” said Christopher Kaufmann, PhD, co-first author of the study and

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Operating Rooms Turn to Zoom-Like Technology for the Age of Covid

(Bloomberg) — Operating rooms tend to be busy places, often bustling with not just the surgeon, but also a phalanx of aides, students, technical advisers and, yes, medical device sales reps. That’s not exactly an ideal environment for social distancing.



a group of people standing in a room: Doctors and nurses attend to a patient during surgery in an operating room at an Apollo Speciality Hospital, operated by Apollo Hospitals Enterprises Ltd., in the Vanagaram area of Chennai, India, on Saturday, Nov. 17, 2018. About a decade ago, Co-Managing Director Suneeta Reddy and her three sisters took over most executive functions at India's largest hospital chain from their father. They embarked on a multi-year building spree in a bet that India's economic growth would spread from its metropolises to second-tier cities, where patients are getting richer. Now, almost 20 billion rupees ($280 million) and four years of construction later, there are signs that strategy is about to pay off.


© Bloomberg
Doctors and nurses attend to a patient during surgery in an operating room at an Apollo Speciality Hospital, operated by Apollo Hospitals Enterprises Ltd., in the Vanagaram area of Chennai, India, on Saturday, Nov. 17, 2018. About a decade ago, Co-Managing Director Suneeta Reddy and her three sisters took over most executive functions at India’s largest hospital chain from their father. They embarked on a multi-year building spree in a bet that India’s economic growth would spread from its metropolises to second-tier cities, where patients are getting richer. Now, almost 20 billion rupees ($280 million) and four years of construction later, there are signs that strategy is about

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University of Oregon-led project identifies the age, depth and carbon stock of the world’s oldest tropical peatlands — ScienceDaily

Researchers probing peatlands to discover clues about past environments and carbon stocks on land have identified peatland that is twice as old and much deeper than previously thought.

Their findings, detailed in an open-access paper published Sept. 14 in the journal Environmental Research Letters, show that an inland site near Putussibau, not far from the Indonesia-Malaysia border, formed at least 47,800 years old and contains peat 18 meters deep — roughly the height of a six-story building.

The study provides new insights about the climate of equatorial rainforests, especially during the last ice age, said study co-author Dan Gavin, a professor of geography at the University of Oregon.

“This existence of this very deep and old peatland provides some clues on past climate,” Gavin said. “It tells us that this area remained sufficiently wet and warm to support peat growth through the last ice age. The climate during that

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Ice discharge in the North Pacific set off series of climate events during last ice age — ScienceDaily

Repeated catastrophic ice discharges from western North America into the North Pacific contributed to, and perhaps triggered, hemispheric-scale changes in the Earth’s climate during the last ice age, new research published online today in Science reveals.

The discovery provides new insight into the impact rapidly melting ice flowing into the North Pacific may have on the climate across the planet, said Maureen Walczak, a paleoclimatologist in Oregon State University’s College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences and the study’s lead author.

“Understanding how the ocean has interacted with glacial ice in the past helps us predict what could happen next,” Walczak said.

The Cordilleran ice sheet once covered large portions of western North America from Alaska to Washington state and western Montana. Radiocarbon dating and analyses of the marine sediment record revealed that recurrent episodes of discharge from this ice sheet over the past 42,000 years were early events in

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Ice Age manatees may have called Texas home — ScienceDaily

Manatees don’t live year-round in Texas, but these gentle, slow-moving sea cows are known to occasionally visit, swimming in for a “summer vacation” from Florida and Mexico and returning to warmer waters for the winter.

Research led by The University of Texas at Austin has found fossil evidence for manatees along the Texas coast dating back to the most recent ice age. The discovery raises questions about whether manatees have been making the visit for thousands of years, or if an ancient population of ice age manatees once called Texas home somewhere between 11,000 and 240,000 years ago.

The findings were published in Palaeontologia Electronica.

“This was an unexpected thing for me because I don’t think about manatees being on the Texas coast today,” said lead author Christopher Bell, a professor at the UT Jackson School of Geosciences. “But they’re here. They’re just not well known.”

The paper co-authors

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