Can the Pixel 5 camera still compete using the same old aging sensor?

Google’s new Pixel phones are here, as is the annual round of speculation over how their cameras will perform. The Pixel cameras have been in a weird spot for a couple of years; the Pixel 2 in 2017 was an incredible leap forward for smartphone photography, but features like Night Sight aside, the 3 and 4 were mostly evolutions on the same hardware and software formula, making what sometimes felt like subjective tweaks more than clear improvements to image quality. It’s to Google’s credit that they’ve still remained among the very best phone cameras you can buy.



a cellphone on a table


It’s impossible to pass real judgment on the Pixel 5 and Pixel 4A 5G, which share the same front and back cameras, until we’re able to test them out for ourselves. From what Google’s said so far, though, they do seem to be similarly evolutionary upgrades.

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For one thing, Google is

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Understanding the effect of aging on the genome — ScienceDaily

Time may be our worst enemy, and aging its most powerful weapon. Our hair turns grey, our strength wanes, and a slew of age-related diseases represent what is happening at the cellular and molecular levels. Aging affects all the cells in our body’s different tissues, and understanding its impact would be of great value in fighting this eternal enemy of all ephemeral life forms.

The key is to first observe and measure. In a paper published in Cell Reports, scientists led by Johan Auwerx at EPFL started by asking a simple question: how do the tissues of aging mice differ from those of mice that are mere adults?

To answer the question, the researchers used the multiple techniques to measure the expression of everyone one of the thousands of mouse’s genes, and to identify any underlying epigenetic differences. The researchers not only measured different layers of information, but they

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Pentagon Is Clinging to Aging Technologies, House Panel Warns

WASHINGTON — A bipartisan House panel said on Tuesday that artificial intelligence, quantum computing, space and biotechnology were “making traditional battlefields and boundaries increasingly irrelevant” — but that the Pentagon was clinging to aging weapons systems meant for a past era.

The panel’s report, called the “Future of Defense Task Force,” is one of many underway in Congress to grapple with the speed at which the Pentagon is adopting new technologies, often using the rising competition with China in an effort to spur the pace of change.

Most reach a similar conclusion: For all the talk of embracing new technologies, the politics of killing off old weapons systems is so forbidding — often because it involves closing factories or bases, and endangers military jobs in congressional districts — that the efforts falter.

The task force said it was concentrating on the next 30 to 50 years, and concluded that the

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