Twilio surges 6% after it agrees to acquire Segment for $3.2 billion

Jeff Lawson, co-founder and CEO of Twilio, launched his business during the recession.
  • Twilio surged to record highs on Monday after it agreed to acquire Segment for $3.2 billion in an all-stock deal.
  • “Segment lets developers and companies break down those [data] silos and build a complete picture of their customer,” Twilio co-founder Jeff Lawson said.
  • The deal is expected to close in the fourth quarter of 2020.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Twilio hit record highs on Monday after it agreed to acquire Segment for $3.2 billion in an all-stock deal.

Segment is a data platform that provides businesses with a unified customer view “to better understand customers and engage more effectively,” Twilio said.

“By joining forces and applying our customer data platform to Twilio’s engagement cloud, we’ll be able to make the entire customer experience seamless from end-to-end,” Segment

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Congress Agrees: Big Tech Is Broken.

This article is part of the On Tech newsletter. You can sign up here to receive it weekdays.

It is stunning that members of Congress mostly agree that four of America’s most successful companies are bullies that abuse their power to stay on top.

That was my thought reading the conclusions of a 16-month congressional investigation into whether Google, Facebook, Amazon and Apple broke the law to squash competition. The assessment was, essentially, yup.

The Democrats and Republicans on the House Judiciary Committee have major points of disagreement, and only Democrats signed this report. But while the two parties are divided — possibly irreconcilably so — over how to fix the problem, they appear to mostly agree that those four companies should not be allowed to continue as is.

It’s not unusual to hate on large companies; it was true of big banks and oil companies at the peak of

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Patrick Mahomes agrees to equity deal with performance tech company Hyperice

  • NFL star quarterback Patrick Mahomes joined performance recovery technology company Hyperice as an investor and brand ambassador.
  • Terms of his equity stake were not announced. 
  • With the transaction, Mahomes adds to his equity portfolio after agreeing to deals with a sports nutrition company and a minority ownership stake in the Kansas City Royals. 



Patrick Mahomes standing on a baseball field: Patrick Mahomes #15 of the Kansas City Chiefs looks on before Super Bowl LIV at Hard Rock Stadium on February 02, 2020 in Miami, Florida.


© Provided by CNBC
Patrick Mahomes #15 of the Kansas City Chiefs looks on before Super Bowl LIV at Hard Rock Stadium on February 02, 2020 in Miami, Florida.

Patrick Mahomes is on a winning streak.

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Days after the Kansas City Chiefs quarterback helped increase ESPN’s “Monday Night Football” ratings and announced he’s expecting his first child, Mahomes secured a new private investment on Thursday.

Mahomes joined performance recovery technology company Hyperice as an investor and brand ambassador. Terms of his equity stake were not announced by the company.

Hyperice, founded in 2010 by Anthony

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Google agrees to pay news publishers $1 billion for content

Oct. 1 (UPI) — Tech giant Google said Thursday it has agreed to pay more than $1 billion to dozens of publishers for news content in the coming years, an answer to complaints that have been made for years by outlets.

Google said a new format, called the News Showcase, will allow publishers to decide what content will be displayed on its search platform.

The company said it will also pay some of the content producers to include premium articles at no cost to readers.

Google’s agreement will pay producers more than $1 billion over three years and will begin immediately.

“This financial commitment — our biggest to date — will pay publishers to create and curate high-quality content for a different kind of online news experience,” Google CEO Sundar Pichai said in a statement.

“This approach is distinct from our other news products because it leans on the editorial

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Google agrees to pay news publishers more than $1 billion

Google will pay publishers more than $1 billion over the next three years through a new program for licensing news.



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The tech giant has signed licensing deals with about 200 publications in select countries with plans to add more and expand geographically.

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Google, along with Facebook, controls a large share of the advertising dollars that once went to publishers in the news industry. Shrinking ad revenue has led to smaller newsrooms and diminishing resources for telling local stories. The billion dollar spend on licensing news is Google’s way of showing publishers it is committed to paying for high quality journalism and sustaining a struggling industry.

The licensing deals, previously announced in June, are part of a new product called News Showcase, where participating publishers can curate and decide for themselves how to present their content on the platform. The content is displayed as a “story panel,”

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Hertfordshire fatal crash: Parish council agrees to average speed camera bid

Whitney Hughes and Gillian Williams

image copyrightWhitney Hughes

image captionWhitney Hughes’ mother Gillian Williams, 55, from Dunstable, was killed while driving home along Redbourn Road between St Albans and Redbourn

A woman whose mother was killed in a road crash has persuaded a council to apply for funds to install average speed cameras on it.

Whitney Hughes’ mother Gillian Williams died on the A5183 between Redbourn and St Albans in Hertfordshire in 2019.

Ms Hughes has campaigned for safety measures along the road, but needed a “constituted” organisation to bid for money to do it.

Redbourn Parish Council said it would apply to the county’s Road Safety Fund.

Ms Hughes said: “I feel relieved something is finally going to be done and I truly hope my mum is the last person to lose their life on Redbourn Road.”

Mrs Williams’ car was hit by another car being
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Google parent agrees to $310M misconduct lawsuit settlement

NEW YORK (AP) — Google’s parent company has reached a $310 million settlement in a shareholder lawsuit over its treatment of allegations of executives’ sexual misconduct.

Alphabet Inc. said Friday that it will prohibit severance packages for anyone fired for misconduct or is the subject of a sexual misconduct investigation. A special team will investigate any allegations against executives and report to the board’s audit committee.

Thousands of Google employees walked out of work in protest in 2018 after The New York Times revealed Android creator Andy Rubin received $90 million in severance even though several employees had filed misconduct allegations against him. Shareholder lawsuits followed, and in 2019 Google launched a board investigation over how it handles sexual misconduct allegations.

In January, David Drummond, the Alphabet’s legal chief, left without an exit package, following accusations of inappropriate relationships with employees. The company didn’t give a reason for his departure,

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