The U.S. Air Force Looks To Advanced Manufacturing To Keep Existing Aircraft Flying And Develop Next-Gen Capabilities

What if there were Olympic events that weren’t physical, but were focused instead on completely geeking out on super-cool breakthrough technologies for real-world aerospace and defense challenges? Even better, what if they offered prize money totaling nearly a million dollars?

Now there are just such events, thanks to the U.S. Air Force’s Rapid Sustainment Office (RSO). In fact, participants in five such Olympic “sports” (or Technical Challenges, as the RSO calls them) have already been competing over the past few months. Those competitions will culminate when the winners are announced during next week’s four-day Advanced Manufacturing Olympics. This virtual conference runs from October 20-23, and features technology demonstrations, expert speakers from both industry and the military, virtual networking opportunities, and the awarding of prized for those Technical Challenges mentioned above.

“RSO is working to revolutionize

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Creating fuel from thin air with artificial leaves

Device
Artificial leaves could one day provide fuel

The sun produces more than enough energy for human activities, but we still can’t capture enough of it, points out Erwin Reisner, energy and sustainability professor at Cambridge University.

He heads a team of researchers trying to capture more of that free energy.

While solar panels have made big advances in recent years, becoming cheaper and more efficient, they just provide electricity, not storable liquid fuels, which are still in great demand.

“If you look at the global energy portfolio and what’s needed, electricity only covers maybe 20-25%. So the question is when we have covered that 25%, what do we do next?” asks Prof Reisner.

His answer is to look to nature: “Plants are a huge inspiration, because they have learned over millions of years how to take up sunlight and store the energy in energy carriers.

“I really believe that artificial

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ET Pre-Prime Day Deals: $400 Off Dell Alienware Aurora R8 RTX 2070 Super Gaming PC, Apple MacBook Air Only $849

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Amazon’s Prime Day sales event officially begins tomorrow, but there’s already deals aplenty that you can take advantage of right now. Walmart kicked off its own sales event on Sunday, and early deals from Amazon, Best Buy, and Dell have been leaking out all weekend. The following are some of the most notable deals that we’ve seen so far:

Dell Alienware Aurora R8 Intel Core i7-9700K Gaming Desktop w/ Nvidia GeForce RTX 2070 Super, 16GB DDR4 RAM, 512GB NVMe SSD, and 1TB HDD ($1,299.99)

Dell’s Alienware Aurora pairs a fast Intel Core i7-9700 processor with an immensely powerful Nvidia GeForce RTX 2070 Super graphics card. This combination makes the system excellent for gaming — not to mention it also comes with a 512GB NVMe SSD as well as a 1TB HDD that gives you plenty

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Prime Day Deal: Apple MacBook Air $150 off

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Macbook Air



Hollis Johnson/Business Insider


  • Apple’s latest MacBook Air that launched in March 2020 is down $150, with prices starting at $850 for Amazon Prime Day 2020. 
  • You get the full $150 discount on the two available models at checkout. 
  • The base 256GB model with a dual-core processor typically retails for $1,000, and the 512GB model with a faster quad-core processor usually goes for $1,300.
  • Getting $150 off on a MacBook Air is a good deal by Apple device standards, and it’s the best we’ve seen for these laptops on Amazon so far. 
  • The MacBook Air is an ultra-slim and portable laptop that’s also the most affordable in Apple’s laptop lineup, and it’s the best MacBook for the vast majority of people who need laptops.

Apple’s latest MacBook Air that launched in March 2020 is $150

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Chemical Segment to Present Lucrative Opportunities in Air Separation Plants Market, China to Exhibit Promising Growth

Owing to the increased adoption of air separation plants in chemical, healthcare and food industry, revenue is set to steer up tremendously through 2029.

DUBAI, UAE / ACCESSWIRE / October 12, 2020 / The air separation plant market expected to surpass US$ 4870.6 million by 2029 as a part of which China and India is expected to witness a positive graph for the demand and production of air separation plants market. Due to increasing demand in major industries, manufacturers are working on developing on-site customized plant systems to gain a steady growth.

“Among the others, though chemical industry will hold maximum share, it will not outsell other major industries. It will surely dominate the market and will hold a considerable share but customized side of it will help the profit rise tremendously. Manufacturers are also focussing on better utilization of resources, raw materials and decreasing labour cost to enhance revenue

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Apple may reveal iPad Air shipment date during ‘iPhone 12’ event

Apple may use Tuesday’s “Hi, Speed” event to tell potential buyers of the new iPad Air when they can purchase the tablet, weeks after the company launched the model during its “Time Flies” event.

During the first “Time Flies” special event on September 15, Apple introduced a redesigned iPad Air, but aside from telling customers it would be available sometime in October, an exact date wasn’t offered during the presentation. With the second Apple event looming, it is suggested Apple may advise of when the tablet will actually go on sale.

According to serial leaker Jon Prosser on Twitter, Apple “will give you the launch date of iPad Air during the October 13th event.” Given the lack of date from Apple itself for its release, it seems plausible a public event will include an update on shipment dates.

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Air Canada slashes Transat buyout price by nearly 75% as COVID-19 hits traffic

(Reuters) – Air Canada <AC.TO> has slashed its price to buy Canadian tour operator Transat A.T. Inc <TRZ.TO>, with the deal now worth about C$188.7 million ($143.86 million), down from C$720 million, as COVID-19 weighs on travel demand, the companies said in a statement on Saturday.

The country’s largest carrier had secured Transat shareholders’ approval for the deal last year with an C$18.00 a share bid, to bolster its then thriving leisure business.

But with the pandemic grounding flights globally, Air Canada faced shareholder pressure to renegotiate the deal which is still pending approval from European and Canadian regulators, Reuters reported in May.

Montreal-based Air Canada, like many of its global peers, has slashed flights, suspended financial forecasts and sought government aid as the industry deals with its worst slump.

Companies have been cancelling deals amid COVID-19 uncertainty, with aircraft parts suppliers Hexcel Corp <HXL.N> and Woodward Inc <WWD.O> abandoning

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Best MacBook Air and MacBook Pro Builds

Find out a tech expert’s picks for the best Mac laptop for mobile professionals, the best Mac laptop for replacing a desktop, and more.

Matching a computer’s build to its intended use isn’t a perfect science, but thankfully Apple makes it easy to customize various Mac laptop configurations. Whether you usually perform tasks that don’t typically overwhelm a computer’s CPU and graphics capabilities, or even if you do, here are the best configurations years of experience and IT consulting suggest work well as at least a baseline for most users.



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Standard 13-inch MacBook Air

Image: Apple

A standard 13-inch MacBook Air, complete with a 1.1Ghz dual-core i3 CPU and Turbo Boost up to 3.2GHz, offers a strong mix of portability and capability. The $999 model’s 256 GB SSD and 8 GB RAM meet the needs of most professionals, thanks in part to Apple’s intelligent architecture that maximizes performance. The laptop’s

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US Air Force sends software updates to one of its oldest aircraft midair

WASHINGTON — For the first time, the U.S. Air Force updated the software code on one of its aircraft while it was in flight, the service announced Oct. 7.

And there’s a surprise twist: The aircraft involved wasn’t the “flying computer” F-35, the mysterious B-21 bomber still under development, or any of the Air Force’s newest and most high-tech jets. Instead, the service tested the technology aboard the U-2 spy plane, one of the oldest and most iconic aircraft in the Air Force’s inventory.

On Sept. 22, the U-2 Federal Laboratory successfully updated the software of a U-2 from the 9th Reconnaissance Wing, which was engaged in a training flight near Beale Air Force Base, California, the Air Force said in a news release.

To push the software code from the developer on the ground to the U-2 in flight, the Air Force used Kubernetes, a containerized system that allows

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Even mildly elevated air pollution associated with increase in absences in Salt Lake City — ScienceDaily

In Salt Lake City schools, absences rise when the air quality worsens, and it’s not just in times of high pollution or “red” air quality days — even days following lower levels of pollutions saw increased absences.

Research is still ongoing, and the evidence isn’t yet conclusive enough to draw a cause-and-effect relationship between air quality and children’s absences from school but the correlation, according to Daniel Mendoza, a research assistant professor in the Department of Atmospheric Sciences and visiting assistant professor in the Department of City & Metropolitan Planning, merits further exploration. Mendoza and his colleagues published their results in Environmental Research Letters.

Air pollution is harmful for not only the health, but also the education and well-being of children in our community,” says study co-author Cheryl Pirozzi, assistant professor in the Division of Respiratory, Critical Care, and Occupational Pulmonary Medicine. “Even at relatively low levels that many

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