the saga contines. CDC saying once again virus is airborne

If only they had told the white house sooner.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention acknowledged Monday that people can sometimes be infected with the coronavirus through airborne transmission, especially in enclosed spaces with inadequate ventilation.

The long-awaited update to the agency Web page explaining how the virus spreads represents an official acknowledgment of growing evidence that under certain conditions, people farther than six feet apart can become infected by tiny droplets and particles that float in the air for minutes and hours, and that they play a role in the pandemic.

“There is evidence that under certain conditions, people with COVID-19 seem to have infected others who were more than six feet away,” the updated Web page states. “These transmissions occurred within enclosed spaces that had inadequate ventilation. Sometimes the infected person was breathing heavily, for example while singing or exercising. the updated Web page states.”

“Under these

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After CDC whiplash, here’s what science says about airborne transmission of the coronavirus

Evidence is mounting that the virus can linger in the air.

When the CDC updated its website on Friday to acknowledge that airborne transmission of the coronavirus beyond six feet may play a role in the COVID-19 pandemic, particularly indoors, the update was hailed by infectious disease experts interviewed by ABC News as an overdue step.

But on Monday morning, the agency took down that language, saying it was posted in “error.” Despite the CDC guidance whiplash, experts say it’s time to recognize that airborne transmission beyond six feet is possible — while continuing to emphasize that close contact within six feet is still the main way the virus is transmitted.

Scientists maintain that close, person-to-person contact is a main driver of the virus’ spread. This transmission is primarily via respiratory droplets

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Here’s what science says about airborne transmission of the coronavirus

When the CDC updated its website on Friday to acknowledge that airborne transmission of the coronavirus beyond six feet may play a role in the COVID-19 pandemic, particularly indoors, the update was hailed by infectious disease experts interviewed by ABC News as an overdue step.



a sign on the side of a building: FILE - In this Wednesday, Sept. 2, 2020, file photo, people sit at tables at San Diego State University in San Diego.


© Gregory Bull/AP
FILE – In this Wednesday, Sept. 2, 2020, file photo, people sit at tables at San Diego State University in San Diego.

But on Monday morning, the agency took down that language, saying it was posted in “error.” Despite the CDC guidance whiplash, experts say it’s time to recognize that airborne transmission beyond six feet is possible — while continuing to emphasize that close contact within six feet is still the main way the virus is transmitted.

MORE: CDC abruptly removes new guidance on coronavirus airborne transmission

Scientists maintain that close, person-to-person contact is a main driver of the virus’ spread. This

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