Animal study shows treatment blocks inflammation and protects lungs without killing the flu virus — ScienceDaily

The raging lung inflammation that can contribute to death from the flu can be stopped in its tracks by a drug derived from a naturally occurring human protein, a new animal study suggests.

In mouse studies, all untreated animals given a lethal dose of influenza died within days. All but one of the infected mice treated with the experimental therapy not only survived, but remained energetic and kept weight on — despite having high levels of the flu virus in their lungs.

The experimental treatment is a heavy dose of MG53, part of a family of proteins that plays an essential role in cell membrane repair. Already identified as a potential therapy for conditions ranging from Alzheimer’s disease to persistent skin wounds, MG53 was found in this study to prevent death from a lethal flu infection by blocking excessive inflammation — without having any effect on the virus itself.

The

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Potential new antibiotics work by disrupting bacterial membrane and summoning immune cells in animal models — ScienceDaily

A team led by scientists in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania has engineered powerful new antimicrobial molecules from toxic proteins found in wasp venom. The team hopes to develop the molecules into new bacteria-killing drugs, an important advancement considering increasing numbers of antibiotic-resistant bacteria which can cause illness such as sepsis and tuberculosis.

In the study, published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the researchers altered a highly toxic small protein from a common Asian wasp species, Vespula lewisii, the Korean yellow-jacket wasp. The alterations enhanced the molecule’s ability to kill bacterial cells while greatly reducing its ability to harm human cells. In animal models, the scientists showed that this family of new antimicrobial molecules made with these alterations could protect mice from otherwise lethal bacterial infections.

There is an urgent need for new drug treatments for bacterial infections, as

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The Nintendo Switch is actually in stock, including the Animal Crossing special edition

switch-animal-crossing

Nintendo

Ever since the pandemic hit, Nintendo has been struggling to keep up with demand for its Switch and Switch Lite game consoles. But according to an early August GameSpot report, Switch console production is back in full swing — or close to it, at least. And while inventory levels are hardly back to normal, in recent weeks it’s been possible to actually find the Switch at online stores like Best Buy and Amazon at its regular $300 price.

Case in point: Right now, the Nintendo Switch Animal Crossing: New Horizons Edition is actually in stock at Amazon for $299. Note that this special edition of the Switch just comes bearing snazzy Animal Crossing artwork. You still need to buy the Animal Crossing game separately. 

In many cases these consoles are still popping in and out of stock like soap bubbles bursting in the bath. But now that we’re seeing

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Jim Cramer Calls Google a ‘Strange Animal’

Google is rebranding G-Suite to Google Workplace. 

“For more than a decade, we’ve been building products to help people transform the way they work,” Google wrote in a blog post on Google Cloud. “Now, work itself is transforming in unprecedented ways. For many of us, work is no longer a physical place we go to, and interactions that used to take place in person are being rapidly digitized. Office workers no longer have impromptu discussions at the coffee machine or while walking to meetings together, and instead have turned their homes into workspaces. Frontline workers, from builders on a construction site to delivery specialists keeping critical supply chains moving, are turning to their phones to help get their jobs done. While doctors treating patients and local government agencies engaging with their communities are accelerating how they can use technology to deliver their services.”

The company explained that its new Google

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Animal rivalries could inspire ‘Napoleonic’ intelligence

Oct. 6 (UPI) — In a paper published Tuesday in the journal Nature Communications, scientists argue that rivalries among animal neighbors could drive cognitive evolution, encouraging the development of ‘Napoleonic’ intelligence.

To date, the study of cognitive evolution among animals has focused on antagonistic and co-operative social interactions within groups — the kinds of interactions thought to demand the development of so-called Machiavellian intelligence.

“Machiavellian intelligence is the House of Cards-style cunning that has evolved to get ahead in social politics within groups,” senior Andy Radford, professor of behavioral ecology at the University of Bristol in Britain, told UPI in an email.

Machiavellian intelligence and the related cognitive processes help animals compete and cooperate with their intergroup peers and relatives.

“We argue that animals also need ‘Napoleonic’ intelligence, the more Game of Thrones-style sharpness necessary to triumph in a world packed with rival outsiders,” Radford said.

According to

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Animal model observation may reveal new cause of hypertension — ScienceDaily

High blood pressure: some people take medication to control it while others commit to low salt diets, exercise or yoga to reduce stress. Blood pressure is a primary vital sign, yet, remarkably, just how the body maintains it is still a mystery.

“We’ve been studying high blood pressure for 100 years and we still have the same ideas,” says Daniel Beard, Ph.D., the Carl J. Wiggers Collegiate Professor of Cardiovascular Physiology. In a new paper in JCI Insight, Beard, Feng Gu, Ph.D., from the department of molecular and integrative physiology, and their team describe a newly observed phenomenon in the way blood pressure is maintained in certain rats.

Their discovery comes on the heels of an inquiry into the linkage between stiffened arteries and high blood pressure, known clinically as hypertension. “What happens when you are hypertensive is your arteries get stiffer. But this is thought to be an

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Watching Cute Animal Videos Reduces Stress And Anxiety In Humans, Science Shows

KEY POINTS

  • Study: Watching adorable animal videos has mental health benefits
  • The videos enhance one’s mood and provide relief against stress
  • After watching the videos, anxiety levels could drop as much as 50% 

Watching images and videos of cute animals for a minimum of 30 minutes reduces stress and anxiety levels, according to a study conducted by researchers from the University of Leeds in the United Kingdom and the Tourism of Western Australia jointly.

In the study, first reported by CNN, the researchers monitored related vitals of 19 respondents comprised of 15 students and four university staff. To get the most ideal results, the study was conducted during the respondents’ winter exams as such a period proved to be the most stressful for both students and staff. 

All participants had decreased blood pressure, heart rate, and anxiety levels after watching cute animal videos compiled for the session. Specifically, the participants

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