argenx Expands Capabilities In Antibody Engineering Through Key Technology Partnerships

  • New partnerships with Chugai and the Clayton Foundation for Research provide access to innovative antibody engineering technologies
     
  • Extension of Halozyme collaboration supports long-term commitment to subcutaneous delivery options for patients

             

October 6, 2020

Breda, the Netherlands / Ghent, Belgium – argenx (Euronext & Nasdaq: ARGX), a global immunology company committed to improving the lives of people suffering from severe autoimmune diseases and cancer, today announced the expansion of its technology capabilities in antibody engineering through new partnerships with Chugai and the Clayton Foundation. The Company is also broadening its collaboration with Halozyme to enable subcutaneous delivery for three additional current or future argenx product candidates. Through these partnerships, argenx gains access to innovative technologies to advance its differentiated pipeline and strengthen its position as a leader in immunology.

“Our Immunology Innovation Program, through which we partner with leading academic researchers, has been foundational in building our pipeline. In keeping with

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Using new technology to study antibody responses in SARS-CoV-2-infected individuals

Using a technology called VirScan to study coronavirus antibody responses in a large cohort of SARS-CoV-2-infected and control individuals, researchers identified epitopes recognized by a large fraction of COVID-19 patients, epitopes cross-reactive with antibodies developed in response to other human coronaviruses, and 10 epitopes likely recognized by neutralizing antibodies.

They used this VirScan data to design a tool for rapid SARS-CoV-2 antibody detection. The clinical course of COVID-19 is notable for its extreme variability. Understanding the factors influencing this spectrum of outcomes – including the variable human immune – is an area of focus.

Ellen Shrock and colleagues used a technology known as VirScan – a tool members of the same group developed previously – to explore the antibody response to SARS-CoV-2 and other human coronaviruses in more than 200 COVID-19 patients and nearly 200 pre-COVID-19 era controls.

Blood serum from COVID-19

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Ultrapotent antibody mix blocks COVID-19 virus attachment — ScienceDaily

A mix of ultrapotent antibodies from recovered COVID-19 patients has been shown to recognize and lock down the infection machinery of the pandemic coronavirus and keep it from entering cells. Each of the antibody types performs these overlapping tasks slightly differently.

Low doses of these antibodies, individually or as a cocktail, were also shown to protect hamsters from infection when exposed to the coronavirus by preventing it from replicating in their lungs.

An advantage of such cocktails is that they might also prevent the natural mutant forms of the virus that arose during this pandemic to escape treatment. As some variants in the infection machinery have already been discovered during the coronavirus pandemic, using a mix of antibodies allows for neutralization of a broad spectrum of such viral variants.

In addition to preventing virus entry into host cells, the presence of the antibodies also seems to set off the infection-fighting

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Accuracy of commercial antibody kits for SARS-CoV-2 varies widely — ScienceDaily

There is wide variation in the performance of commercial kits for detecting antibodies against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), according to a study published September 24 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Jonathan Edgeworth and Blair Merrick of Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust, Suzanne Pickering and Katie Doores of King’s College London, and colleagues. As noted by the authors, the rigorous comparison of antibody testing platforms will inform the deployment of point-of-care technologies in healthcare settings and their use in monitoring SARS-CoV-2 infections.

Throat and nose swab tests for SARS-CoV-2 establish if someone is infected with the virus that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). These tests are highly sensitive — capable of detecting very low viral RNA levels — and are optimal for the early detection of the virus. The performance of these tests depends on the time the sample is collected, with viral load

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