12th District Court of Appeals says New Miami does not have to repay speeders $3.4 million

One of the speeders’ attorneys, Josh Engel, said they are considering an Ohio Supreme Court appeal.

“We are disappointed, especially since the court (and particularly Judge Piper) seemed to recognize the unfairness of a system designed primarily for profit, not safety,” Engel told the Journal-News.

Retired Butler County Judge Michael Sage deemed the program unlawful in March 2014 and Judge Michael Oster affirmed that ruling and ordered the village repay the tickets and around $400,000 in interest.

ExploreNew Miami: Village only owes speeders $10K, not $3.4M

New Miami’s outside counsel James Englert said he could not comment until he read the decision.

The speed cameras won’t begin rolling again any time soon however because the village is also locked in litigation with the state over punitive new laws that have curtailed their program. New Miami asked Common Pleas Judge Greg Howard to issue a temporary restraining order and injunction

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U.S. appeals judge’s ruling that blocked U.S. ban on TikTok downloads

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. government said in a court filing on Thursday it was appealing a judge’s ruling that prevented it from prohibiting new downloads of the Chinese-owned short video-sharing app TikTok.

The Justice Department said it appealed the order to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit.

In late September, a U.S. judge temporarily blocked a Trump administration order that was set to bar Apple Inc <AAPL.O> and Alphabet Inc’s Google <GOOGL.O> from offering new TikTok downloads.

China’s ByteDance, which owns TikTok, has been under pressure to sell the popular app. The White House contends that TikTok poses national security concerns as personal data collected on 100 million Americans who use the app could be obtained by China’s government. Any deal will also still need to be reviewed by the U.S. government’s Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CFIUS).

Negotiations are under way for

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U.S. government appeals judge’s ruling to block WeChat app store ban

By David Shepardson

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. Justice Department on Friday said it was appealing a judge’s decision to block the government from barring Apple Inc <AAPL.O> and Alphabet Inc’s <GOOGL.O> Google from offering Chinese-owned messaging app WeChat for download in U.S. app stores.

The government said it was appealing the Sept. 19 preliminary junction issued by U.S. Magistrate Judge Laurel Beeler to the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. The injunction blocked the U.S. Commerce Department order, which would also bar other U.S. transactions with Tencent Holding’s <0700.HK> WeChat, potentially making the app unusable in the United States.

A U.S. spokesman for Tencent did not immediately comment.

The Justice Department said earlier that Beeler’s order was in error and “permits the continued, unfettered use of WeChat, a mobile application that the Executive Branch has determined constitutes a threat to the national security and foreign policy of the United

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U.S. appeals judge’s ruling to block WeChat app store ban

FILE PHOTO: The messenger app WeChat is seen among U.S. flags in this illustration picture taken Aug. 7, 2020. REUTERS/Florence Lo/Illustration/File Photo

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. Justice Department on Friday said it was appealing a judge’s decision to block the government from barring Apple Inc AAPL.O and Alphabet Inc’s GOOGL.O Google from offering Chinese-owned messaging app WeChat for download in U.S. app stores.

The government said it was appealing to the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals the Sept. 19 preliminary junction issued by U.S. Magistrate Judge Laurel Beeler. The injunction blocked the U.S. Commerce Department order, which would also bar other U.S. transactions with Tencent Holding’s 0700.HK WeChat, potentially making the app unusable in the United States.

A U.S. spokesman for Tencent did not immediately comment.

The Justice Department said earlier that Beeler’s order was in error and “permits the continued, unfettered use of WeChat, a mobile application

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EU appeals against Apple ruling in $15 billion tax battle

  • The EU’s general court ruled in July that the Commission had failed to prove that the Irish government had given a tax advantage to the tech giant.
  • The Commission will now take the case to the highest court in Europe.
  • “We have to continue to use all tools at our disposal to ensure companies pay their fair share of tax,” the EU’s competition chief Margrethe Vestager said.



Margrethe Vestager wearing a pink shirt: European Commission executive vice president Margrethe Vestager talks to media in Brussels, Belgium.


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European Commission executive vice president Margrethe Vestager talks to media in Brussels, Belgium.

LONDON — The battle between the EU and Apple on taxation is not over yet.

On Friday, the European Commission, which is the executive arm of the EU, said it would appeal a court ruling involving Apple and the Republic of Ireland. 

The EU’s general court ruled in July that the Commission had failed to prove that the Irish government had given a tax advantage to

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Apple Shares Slip As EU Commission Appeals $15 Billion Tax Ruling

Apple Inc. shares slipped lower Friday after the European Commission said it would appeal a ruling that freed the tech giant from paying a $15 billion back tax payment to the government of Ireland.



background pattern: Apple Shares Slip As EU Commission Appeals $15 Billion Tax Ruling


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Apple Shares Slip As EU Commission Appeals $15 Billion Tax Ruling

Europe’s General Court ruled in July that the EU Commission, as well as Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager, “did not succeed in showing to the requisite legal standard that there was an advantage” in Apple’s tax arrangement with the Republic of Ireland that would have violated EU rules.”

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The original order from the European Commission in 2016 had called on Apple to pay €13 billion ($15 billion) in back taxes to the Irish government after authorities said the two had agreed an unfair tax agreement as part of Apple’s investment in the Republic.

“The General Court judgment raises important legal issues that

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