Tesla Seeks Approval to Make Batteries at New Texas Plant

Tesla  (TSLA) – Get Report won’t only be assembling the Cybertruck at its new Gigafactory in Austin, Texas, when it turns on the switch next year: The company also plans to mass-produce batteries.

Tesla has filed documents with the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality seeking permission to operate a “cell-manufacturing unit” at what it calls Tesla Giga Austin.

According to a 188-page air-quality permit application filed sometime between July and last month, Tesla is proposing “to operate a cell-manufacturing unit to produce the battery packs that are installed in the vehicle.”

GHD Services, which reportedly submitted the registration on Tesla’s behalf, said in the application that six nitrogen-blanketed tanks, each with a volume of 20,000 liters, will be necessary to manufacture the cells, according to reports.

The environmental permit application was first reported by the Austin Business Journal.

At Tesla’s “Battery Day” event last month. CEO Elon Musk

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Tesla Seeks Approval for Battery-Cell Output at New Texas Plant

(Bloomberg) — Tesla Inc.’s new factory in Austin, Texas, won’t build only the Cybertruck: State filings suggest the company also plans to make batteries on site as part of an ambitious strategy to further integrate its supply chain.



a hand holding a remote control: Martin Sukup, an electrical engineer for Tesla Motors Inc., demonstrates the charging procedure on an S sedan before the grand opening of the Tesla Supercharger station in Lebec, California, U.S., on Friday, Oct. 19, 2012. T


© Bloomberg
Martin Sukup, an electrical engineer for Tesla Motors Inc., demonstrates the charging procedure on an S sedan before the grand opening of the Tesla Supercharger station in Lebec, California, U.S., on Friday, Oct. 19, 2012. T

“The facility is proposing to operate a cell-manufacturing unit to produce the battery packs that are installed in the vehicle,” says an 188-page air-quality permit application filed with the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. The documents Bloomberg reviewed were filed between July and September.

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Chief Executive Officer Elon Musk announced during the electric-car manufacturer’s quarterly earnings call in July that Tesla had chosen Austin as the site of its next plant. In

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Why Apple Didn’t Need FDA Approval for the Blood Oxygen Tracking Feature in the Apple Watch Series 6

Prior to releasing ECG functionality in the Apple Watch Series 4, Apple needed FDA approval for the feature, but the same isn’t true of Blood Oxygen monitoring in the Apple Watch Series 6 because Apple doesn’t see it as a medical feature.


As outlined by The Verge, pulse oximeters like the blood oxygen tracking feature in the Apple Watch are considered Class II Medical devices and documentation is generally required, but there’s a way around that. If a pulse oximeter is marketed as being for general wellness or fun rather than for a medical purpose, FDA documentation is not required.

That’s the reason why the blood oxygen tracking feature is not being marketed by Apple as a medical feature, and an Apple Support document clearly states that measurements taken using blood oxygen tracking are “not intended for medical use” and are designed for “general fitness and wellness purposes.”

The

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Japan’s Sony and Kioxia seeking U.S. approval to supply to Huawei – Nikkei

FILE PHOTO: A Huawei company logo is pictured at the Shenzhen International Airport in Shenzhen, Guangdong province, China, July 22, 2019. REUTERS/Aly Song/File Photo

TOKYO (Reuters) – Japan’s Sony Corp and memory chipmaker Kioxia Holdings Corp have applied for U.S. approval to continue supplying Huawei Technologies Co Ltd, Nikkei reported on Sunday.

If confirmed, the move follows other tech companies such as Intel Corp that recently received licences from U.S. authorities.

With U.S.-China ties at their worst in decades, Washington has been pushing governments around to world to squeeze out Huawei, arguing that the telecoms giant would transfer data to the Chinese government for espionage.

Huawei is one of the top customers for Sony’s image sensors for smartphones. Kioxia Holdings Corp is the world’s No. 2 maker of flash memory chips and a Huawei supplier.

Nikkei here said without U.S. licenses, Sony and Kioxia would face risk to their earnings.

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Japan’s Sony and Kioxia seeking U.S. approval to supply to Huawei: Nikkei

FILE PHOTO: The Huawei logo is seen at the IFA consumer technology fair, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Berlin, Germany September 3, 2020. REUTERS/Michele Tantussi/File Photo

TOKYO (Reuters) – Japan’s Sony Corp and memory chipmaker Kioxia Holdings Corp have applied for U.S. approval to continue supplying Huawei Technologies Co Ltd, Nikkei reported on Sunday.

If confirmed, the move follows other tech companies such as Intel Corp that recently received licences from U.S. authorities.

With U.S.-China ties at their worst in decades, Washington has been pushing governments around to world to squeeze out Huawei, arguing that the telecoms giant would transfer data to the Chinese government for espionage.

Huawei is one of the top customers for Sony’s image sensors for smartphones. Kioxia Holdings Corp is the world’s No. 2 maker of flash memory chips and a Huawei supplier.

Nikkei here said without U.S. licenses, Sony and Kioxia would face

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Google’s $2.1 billion Fitbit deal set for EU approval: Reuters

  • Google is expected to win EU approval for its $2.1 billion Fitbit deal after it addressed competition and data concerns, Reuters reported.
  • The internet giant has promised it will not use Fitbit data to personalize adverts for 10 years, according to a Financial Times report.
  • It will also ensure competitors can use its Android and Cloud platforms, according to people familiar with the matter.
  • The EU opened a four-month long investigation into Google’s acquisition of Fitbit in August. The deal was first announced in November 2019.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Google’s $2.1 billion acquisition of wearables company Fitbit appears to have cleared a major hurdle.

It will be cleared by EU antitrust regulators after the tech giant agreed Tuesday to restrict how it uses customer data, according to multiple reports.

Google promised regulators that it would not personalize adverts based on user data for 10 years, up

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Adelman Travel Unveils Innovation in the Future of Pre-trip Approval

Hot Spot Approvals is a self-service, web-based solution focused on real-time employee safety

MILWAUKEE, Sept. 29, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Corporate clients of Adelman Travel, with travel originating from the U.S., now have access to Hot Spot Approvals, a proprietary pre-trip approval technology designed to help them identify domestic and international high-risk locations and automatically approve or deny travel bookings based on a company’s requirements.

“Due to the global pandemic, travel protocols and requirements are changing constantly, and companies need to be able to evaluate risks and trigger approval requirements in real-time based on the destinations they choose,” said Steve Cline, President and COO of Adelman Travel. “Inclusive of our return to travel strategy and consultation with our customers, understanding their duty of care program and priorities, we are able to incorporate a solution that empowers them to keep their travelers safe and mitigate risks.”

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Smartphone App For Diagnosing Autism Could Win FDA Approval

A system that uses A.I. to identify people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has been submitted to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and could become a valuable tool for primary care pediatricians in diagnosing autism. Its creators hope that it will help children with autism to be identified younger, thereby getting them the assistance they need sooner.

“Based on parent or pediatrician concern, a pediatrician would prescribe Cognoa’s parent-facing mobile application,” Dave Happel, CEO of Cognoa, told Digital Trends. “Once in the app, the parent answers a 10- to 15-minute questionnaire about their child’s behavioral patterns, then uploads two home videos of the child capturing their behavior in a natural environment. The videos are sent to a trained professional, who observes [them] and answers questions about their observations, which is fed into Cognoa’s algorithms. In addition, the pediatrician answers a questionnaire about the child’s behavior.”

Cognoa’s algorithm then

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ByteDance Files for China Approval to Export TikTok Tech

(Bloomberg) — ByteDance Ltd., the Chinese parent of video app TikTok, submitted an application in Beijing for permission to export technology, as it tries to work out an agreement with the Trump administration that will avoid a U.S. ban on the service.



a hand holding a cell phone: The logo for ByteDance Ltd.'s TikTok app is arranged for a photograph on a smartphone in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, on Monday, Sept. 14, 2020. Oracle Corp. is the winning bidder for a deal with TikTok’s U.S. operations, people familiar with the talks said, after main rival Microsoft Corp. announced its offer for the video app was rejected.


© Bloomberg
The logo for ByteDance Ltd.’s TikTok app is arranged for a photograph on a smartphone in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, on Monday, Sept. 14, 2020. Oracle Corp. is the winning bidder for a deal with TikTok’s U.S. operations, people familiar with the talks said, after main rival Microsoft Corp. announced its offer for the video app was rejected.

The company said it filed the request with the city’s commerce bureau after China tightened restrictions on the export of certain technologies, including those used in TikTok. A spokesman for the commerce ministry acknowledged the filing Thursday, saying it’ll be assessed “in accordance with the relevant rules

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ByteDance asks China for approval to export TikTok technology: report

TikTok’s parent company ByteDance has sought permission from the Chinese government to export technology, Bloomberg reported Wednesday.

ByteDance filed a request with the Beijing Municipal Commerce Bureau asking for approval to export its technology under restrictions recently implemented by the Chinese government, according to Bloomberg.

ByteDance, TikTok, and the Commerce Bureau did not respond to requests for comment.

In August, China expanded its list of “forbidden and restricted technology exports” to include “personalized information recommendation services based on data analysis” — such as the algorithm that powers TikTok. That move threw a wrench in the TikTok deal by requiring the company to obtain a license from the government, effectively giving Beijing veto power over a deal.

Following the announcement of the new rules, ByteDance reportedly considered bypassing that hurdle by selling TikTok without handing over its source code, but Bloomberg’s report Wednesday suggests the company wants the algorithm to be

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