StormBreaker bomb approved for use on F-15E

Oct. 13 (UPI) — U.S. Air Force’s Air Combat Command has approved Raytheon’s StormBreaker smart weapon for use on the F-15E, Raytheon announced Tuesday.

“StormBreaker delivers an unprecedented capability to pilots in the field,” said Paul Ferraro, vice president of Raytheon’s Air Power business, in a press release. “The weapon gives airmen a significant advantage – the ability to strike maritime or land-based maneuvering targets at range in adverse weather.”

The StormBreaker, which entered operational testing in 2018, is a small diameter bomb that features a multimode seeker to guide the weapon with infrared, millimeter-wave radar and semi-active lasers in addition to or with GPS and inertial system guide.

The Air Force’s fielding decision means F-15E squadrons can now be equipped with the weapon. The Navy and Marines intend to use it on their versions of the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter.

The StormBreaker’s small size means fewer aircraft can address

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India has Approved Incentives for 16 Smartphone Companies including Apple’s Big Three iPhone Manufacturing Partners

 

In May Patently Apple posted a report titled “The Indian Government has dropped Contentious Clauses in their new ‘Production Linked Incentive’ Program that could be Positive for Apple.” In order to gain from the new Incentive in India, Smartphone companies had to invest in the country in order to tap into the scheme. In late June we reported on Foxconn making a huge investment in an iPhone plant in India. Last week we reported that Pegatron was going to open a plant supporting Apple’s supply chain for cases in 2021 (2 reports, 01 & 02). In August we reported that Wistron was hiring for its third iPhone plant.

 

Today we’re learning that the Indian government has stated that “it was approving incentives under a federal plan to boost domestic smartphone production to 16 companies, including top Apple suppliers Foxconn, Wistron and Pegatron.” The companies invested as requested and

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India’s drug authority approved paper-strip Covid-19 test that could return results within hour

India’s drug authority last month approved a paper-strip test for Covid-19 that shows results in less than an hour, the head of the government institute that invented the test told CNN on Monday.



a person in a blue dress: A resident is tested for coronavirus in Mumbai.


© PUNIT PARANJPE/AFP/AFP via Getty Images
A resident is tested for coronavirus in Mumbai.

The test, called FELUDA—an acronym for FNCAS9 Editor-Limited Uniform Detection Assay—was named after a popular Indian fictional detective. It intends to “address the urgent need for accurate mass testing,” according to a statement from TATA Sons, which manufactured the test.

The kit could be manufactured for self-testing in the future, according to Agarwal, but the prototype being developed currently is only intended for testing in labs.

The FELUDA test follows a similar rapid test kit developed in the US this spring. Both tests use a gene-editing technology called CRISPR to detect the virus in a patient’s RNA. The US Food and Drug

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Three Sci-tech innovation IPOs in China approved

(MENAFN)

The initial public offering (IPO) of three companies on the science and technology innovation board has been approved by the securities regulator in China.

Shanghai Taitan Scientific Co., Ltd., Frontier Biotechnologies Inc. and Shenzhen Consys Science & Technology Co., Ltd. are both going to be listed on the Shanghai Stock Exchange’s sci-tech innovation board, which is also called the STAR market the China Securities Regulatory Commission said.

The companies and their underwriters are going to confirm the IPO dates and released their prospectuses after discussions with the stock exchange.

The STAR market that was made in June of the earlier year to support firms in the high-tech and strategic emerging sectors, makes listing criteria easier but it has higher requirements for information disclosure.

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RapidAI Among the First Stroke Imaging Companies with Software Approved for Medicare New Technology Add-on Payment

Stroke Imaging Makes Significant Stride in Reimbursement. Helps U.S. Hospitals More Easily Adopt the Latest Advancements in Stroke Care

RapidAI, the worldwide leader in advanced imaging for stroke, today announced Rapid LVO is among the first software products to qualify for the New Technology Add-on Payment (NTAP). NTAP is part of the CMS Inpatient Prospective Payment System (IPPS). A significant advancement in stroke care and reimbursement for Medicare patients, the news further fuels the expansion of advanced stroke imaging for those technologies that meet the NTAP requirements, foremost Rapid LVO from RapidAI.

The new NTAP program applies to LVO triage and notification for stroke. Rapid LVO explicitly meets the definition of measuring arterial blood flow in the brain per the issued NTAP code definition. RapidAI offers the most comprehensive stroke imaging platform available. Once an LVO (Large Vessel Occlusion) is identified, Rapid ASPECTS can quantify the severity of the stroke,

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Understanding how the conditionally approved COVID-19 drug works is key to improving treatments, says researcher — ScienceDaily

Researchers at the University of Alberta have discovered a novel, second mechanism of action by the antiviral drug remdesivir against SARS-CoV-2, according to findings published today in the Journal of Biological Chemistry.

The research team previously demonstrated how remdesivir inhibits the COVID-19 virus’s polymerase or replication machinery in a test tube.

Matthias Götte, chair of medical microbiology and immunology in the Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry, likened the polymerase to the engine of the virus. He said the first mechanism the team identified is like putting diesel fuel into an engine that needs regular gasoline.

“You can imagine that if you give it more and more diesel, you will go slower and slower and slower,” he said.

The newly identified mechanism is more like a roadblock, “so if you want to go from A to B with the wrong fuel and terrible road conditions, you either never reach B

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