Meet the New Innovators: 6 Entrepreneurs Building the Future of the Art World, Now

A version of this article first appeared in the fall 2020 Artnet Intelligence Report, which you can download for free here. 

These founders, visionaries, and upstarts are part of Artnet’s New Innovators List. Whether developing new software or constructing novel platforms for exchange, these six innovators remind us that you can’t build the future with outmoded tools.

See the complete list of the New Innovators here and check back for more in-depth profiles in the coming days.

 

Tyler Woolcott, 38, Director of StudioVisit, London

Tyler Woolcott, Owner StudioVisit London.

Tyler Woolcott, Owner StudioVisit London.

Thanks to Tyler Woolcott, artists can now make much-needed money by offering bespoke visits to their studios, priced up to £250 per person. “They are fully in control,” Woolcott says. “StudioVisit gives artists the tools to become a self-sustaining, independent institution.” The expat American has nearly 40 artists on his books—and the list is growing. Tours are by necessity mostly virtual

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Author John Rocco retells the true story of Apollo 11 with amazing art and science

“How We Got to the Moon”, out today (Oct. 6) peels back the curtain to expose the true story of NASA’s Apollo program and how people from all walks of life worked together to accomplish the impossible.

The new children’s book, fully titled “How We Got to the Moon: The People, Technology, and Daring Feats of Science Behind Humanity’s Greatest Adventure” (Random House Children’s Books, 2020) and written and illustrated by New York Times bestselling author and illustrator John Rocco, who wrote and illustrated “Blackout” and illustrated the famed series “Percy Jackson,” goes on sale today (Oct. 6). 

The book takes an immersive approach to NASA’s “moonshot” Apollo program, exploring the science behind the Apollo 11 journey and introducing some of the people who made the first crewed moon landing possible. 

“I wanted to make a book that I would have loved as a kid as a kid … and

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Technology, spiritualism linked in Art Institute sound exhibit

One tap, then another, then a rapid-fire sequence. Silence, interrupted by a sudden chorus of clicks and clacks. The sounds emerge from a row of mysterious metal objects, with no evident human volition. Yet there’s a sense of urgency in this indecipherable conversation, a message trying to get through.

This is Matthew Ostrowski’s “Summerland,” on view at the Albany Museum of History and Art through Jan. 3. A sound installation designed for 24 antique telegraph sounders, the piece is inspired by the overlap of science and spiritualism during the mid-19th century.

The tapping of a telegraph machine might seem to exist at the opposite end of the believability spectrum from the rapping sounds purportedly made by spirits during séances. But at the time, both had an aura of the supernatural about them.

“The telegraph was the first piece of technology using electricity that made it into any kind of circulation

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