Asian shares mixed as China reports faster growth in trade

Shares are mixed in Asia after China reported its exports jumped nearly 10% in dollar terms in September as its economy recovered from the coronavirus pandemic

Shares were mixed in Asia on Tuesday, as investors were encouraged by strong growth in China’s trade in September.

An overnight rally on Wall Street, driven mainly by technology companies such as Apple and Amazon, faded amid worries over U.S. economic stimulus and a resurgence of coronavirus caseloads in many countries.

But the release of stronger trade data in Beijing helped Tokyo recover from early losses. Shanghai declined. Hong Kong’s market was closed for a typhoon.

China’s exports rose 9.9% from a year earlier to $239.8 billion in September, while imports gained 13.2% to $202.8 billion. Tuesday’s customs data showed

Read More
Read More

Asian shares lower after tech-driven rally on Wall Street

Chinese state media reported that exports jumped 10.2% in yuan, or renminbi, terms in September from a year earlier, while imports rose 4.3%, according to the General Administration of Customs. Dollar-based figures were due later in the day.

Traders were keeping an eye on the Chinese currency after the central bank scrapped a requirement for currency traders to post cash deposits, opening the way for more negative speculation on the country’s yuan, which might help to restrain its rise in value.

The change took effect Monday and eliminates a requirement imposed in 2018 for a 20% deposit on yuan trades to discourage speculators.

The recovery of the world’s second biggest economy has been a rare bright spot as investors wait to see if the U.S. Congress will manage to provide further economic aid for Americans and businesses struggling due to the coronavirus pandemic. With caseloads in the U.S., Europe and

Read More
Read More

Asian stocks set to rise as tech, stimulus hopes fuel global rally

NEW YORK (Reuters) – Asian stocks were set to rise on Tuesday as a renewed tech rally and fresh optimism that Washington would deliver a coronavirus relief package helped lift global equity markets.

FILE PHOTO: A worker wearing a protective mask walks as he cleans the floor past an electronic board displaying the stock market index at the Indonesia Stock Exchange (IDX),in Jakarta, Indonesia, September 8, 2020. REUTERS/Willy Kurniawan

Shares in Apple Inc surged 6.4% on Wall Street on Monday ahead of an expected debut of its latest iPhone on Tuesday, helping boost technology stocks, while Amazon rallied 4.8% ahead of its Prime Day shopping event this week.

CommSec Senior Economist Ryan Felsman said a COVID-19 resurgence in Europe and the United States is partly fueling the tech rally.

“Once again, there is a desire to hold the stay-at-home types of technology stocks…which will still generate profits and will be

Read More
Read More

Central Asian horse riders played ball games 3,000 years ago — ScienceDaily

Researchers have investigated ancient leather balls discovered in the graves of horse riders in northwest China. According to the international research team, they are around 3,000 years old, making them the oldest balls in Eurasia. The find suggests amongst others that the mounted warriors of Central Asia played ball games to keep themselves fit.

Today, ball games are one of the most popular leisure activities in the world, an important form of mass entertainment and big business. But who invented balls, where and when? The oldest balls that are currently known about were made in Egypt about 4,500 years ago using linen. Central Americans have been playing ball games for at least 3,700 years, as evidenced through monumental ball courts made of stone and depictions of ball players. Their oldest balls were made of rubber. Until now, it was believed that ball games in Europe and Asia followed much later:

Read More
Read More

New biochemical research shows significant turnovers in Southeast Asian environments and animals during the Pleistocene — ScienceDaily

In a paper published today in the journal Nature, scientists from the Department of Archaeology at MPI-SHH in Germany and Griffith University’s Australian Research Centre for Human Evolution have found that the loss of these grasslands was instrumental in the extinction of many of the region’s megafauna, and probably of ancient humans too.

“Southeast Asia is often overlooked in global discussions of megafauna extinctions,” says Associate Professor Julien Louys who led the study, “but in fact it once had a much richer mammal community full of giants that are now all extinct.”

By looking at stable isotope records in modern and fossil mammal teeth, the researchers were able to reconstruct whether past animals predominately ate tropical grasses or leaves, as well as the climatic conditions at the time they were alive. “These types of analyses provide us with unique and unparalleled snapshots into the diets of these species and

Read More
Read More

Investors sour on baht, trim long bets on most emerging Asian currencies: Reuters poll

(Reuters) – Investors turned bearish on the Thai baht for the first time in two months, highlighting concerns over the pace of recovery in Southeast Asia’s second-largest economy through the COVID-19 pandemic and a domestic political crisis.

FILE PHOTO: A Thailand Baht note is seen in this illustration photo June 1, 2017. REUTERS/Thomas White/Illustration

Bullish bets on most other emerging Asian currencies were scaled back with the U.S. dollar near two-month highs in recent weeks amid uncertainty leading up to the U.S. Presidential election, while market participants further increased short positions on the Indonesian rupiah IDR=.

Short positions on the baht THB=TH were at their highest since late-April, a fortnightly poll of 12 respondents showed, as the government tries to revive the tourism-reliant economy by approving long-stay visas for foreign tourists, providing tax incentives and cash handouts.

Last month, the Thai central bank left interest rates unchanged and upgraded

Read More
Read More

POLL-Investors sour on baht, trim long bets on most emerging Asian currencies

By Shashwat Awasthi

Oct 1 (Reuters)Investors turned bearish on the Thai baht for the first time in two months, highlighting concerns over the pace of recovery in Southeast Asia’s second-largest economy through the COVID-19 pandemic and a domestic political crisis.

Bullish bets on most other emerging Asian currencies were scaled back with the U.S. dollar near two-month highs in recent weeks amid uncertainty leading up to the U.S. Presidential election, while market participants further increased short positions on the Indonesian rupiah IDR=.

Short positions on the baht THB=TH were at their highest since late-April, a fortnightly poll of 12 respondents showed, as the government tries to revive the tourism-reliant economy by approving long-stay visas for foreign tourists, providing tax incentives and cash handouts.

Last month, the Thai central bank left interest rates unchanged and upgraded its gross domestic product outlook, but more than two months of

Read More
Read More

Asian Snakes Spotted Disemboweling Toads Instead Of Swallowing Them Whole

KEY POINTS

  • 3 Asian snakes were documented eviscerating preys instead of swallowing them whole
  • It is the first time such feeding behavior was observed in the species
  • It’s possible that what they were eating has something to do with the behavior

For the first time, researchers observed snakes on three different occasions eviscerating toads instead of swallowing them whole. What could be behind these particularly gruesome attacks?

Snake is popularly known to eat its prey by swallowing it whole but for the first time, a team of researchers documented snakes that disemboweled prey instead of swallowing them whole.

In the study published in the journal Herpetozoa, the researchers describe three separate incidents during their observations in Thailand wherein they documented small-banded Kukri Snakes (Oligodon fasciolatus) using their enlarged posterior maxillary teeth to cut open their live preys.

“The snakes inserted their heads into the abdomen of the toads, pulled out

Read More
Read More

Scientists predict potential spread, habitat of invasive Asian giant hornet

Scientists predict potential spread, habitat of invasive Asian giant hornet
The world’s largest hornet, the Asian giant hornet has been encountered in the Pacific Northwest. New research at Washington State University predicts where the hornet could find suitable habitat, both in the U.S. and globally, and how quickly it could spread, should it establish a foothold. Credit: WSDA

Researchers at Washington State University have predicted how and where the Asian giant hornet, an invasive newcomer to the Pacific Northwest, popularly dubbed the “murder hornet,” could spread and find ideal habitat, both in the United States and globally.


Sharing their discoveries in a newly published article in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the team found that if the world’s largest hornet gains a foothold in Washington state, it could spread down much of the west coast of the United States.

The Asian giant hornet could also find suitable habitat throughout the eastern seaboard and populous parts of

Read More
Read More

Asian shares mixed after technology fall leads US stock fall

TOKYO (AP) – Asian shares were mixed Friday following a selloff of technology shares on Wall Street.

Japan’s benchmark Nikkei 225 recouped early losses to rise 0.3% in morning trading to 23,310.94. South Korea’s Kospi dropped 0.8% to 2,377.92, while Australia’s S&P;/ASX 200 lost 0.8% to 5,860.50. Hong Kong’s Hang Seng gained 0.3% to 24,394.06, while the Shanghai Composite slipped 0.2% to 3,228.01.

Shares were lower in Taiwan and Southeast Asia.

Analysts say investors are preoccupied with the coronavirus pandemic and hopes for development of a safe, effective vaccine.

While Big Tech is benefiting from the shift to online life that the pandemic and ensuing stay-at-home economy has accelerated, critics said their stocks prices have surged too high.

“Big tech stocks might have seemed like safe havens, but they have found themselves at the center of a brutal sell-off,” said Stephen Innes, chief global market strategist at AxiCorp.

The catch

Read More
Read More