3 Astronauts Launching To ISS This Week, 3 Others Coming Home

KEY POINTS

  • 3 astronauts are launching to the ISS from Kazakhstan this week
  • They will only have a week together with the current residents of the ISS 
  • In November, the ISS will celebrate the 20th year of continuous human presence aboard the space lab

Three astronauts are set to launch to the International Space Station (ISS) this week to join the three astronauts currently aboard the orbiting laboratory. But their time together will be short-lived because the three current residents are already set to come home next week.

NASA astronaut Kate Rubins and Roscosmos cosmonauts Sergey Ryzhikov and Sergey Kud-Sverchkov are scheduled to launch aboard a Soyuz MS-17 spacecraft Wednesday. The three will launch from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan and are expected to arrive and dock to the ISS just hours later around 4:52 a.m EDT.

Live coverage of the 1:45 a.m. launch will be available on NASA Television

Read More
Read More

Astronauts Prepare To Receive Cosmetics And A New Toilet : NPR

Northrup Grumman’s Antares rocket lifts off from the NASA Wallops test flight facility in Virginia on Oct. 2. The rocket was scheduled to deliver supplies to the International Space Station.

Thom Baur/Northrup Grumman /AP


hide caption

toggle caption

Thom Baur/Northrup Grumman /AP

Northrup Grumman’s Antares rocket lifts off from the NASA Wallops test flight facility in Virginia on Oct. 2. The rocket was scheduled to deliver supplies to the International Space Station.

Thom Baur/Northrup Grumman /AP

Hygiene and self care are vital — even in zero gravity. Which is why astronauts on the International Space Station are preparing for a fun delivery: a skincare serum from the cosmetics maker Estée Lauder, as well as a new and improved toilet.

Astronauts won’t actually be using the brand’s Advanced Night Repair Synchronized Multi-Recovery Complex, says Robyn Gatens, the acting director of the International Space Station. Instead, the plan is for them to

Read More
Read More

Rocket problem prompts NASA and SpaceX to delay next launch of astronauts

“We have a strong working relationship with our SpaceX partner,” Kathy Lueders, associate administrator of NASA’s human exploration and operations mission directorate, said in the post. “With the high cadence of missions SpaceX performs, it really gives us incredible insight into this commercial system and helps us make informed decisions about the status of our missions. The teams are actively working this finding on the engines, and we should be a lot smarter within the coming week.”

SpaceX did not respond to a request for comment.

The mission, which had previously been scheduled for Oct. 31, would launch NASA astronauts Michael Hopkins, Shannon Walker, Victor Glover as well as Japanese astronaut Soichi Noguchi to the space station for a stay of about six months.

It would be SpaceX’s first operational mission of flying full crews for extended stays after it successfully completed a shorter test mission with two astronauts in

Read More
Read More

China selects 18 new astronauts ahead of space station construction

HELSINKI — China’s human spaceflight agency has selected a group of 18 new astronauts to participate in the country’s upcoming space station project.

The China Manned Space Agency (CMSA) announced the results Thursday (Chinese), a few days after the final decisions.

The 18 new Chinese astronauts consist of seven pilots, seven spaceflight engineers and four payload specialists. The final selection includes just one woman. The process, which included primary, secondary and final selections, began in May 2018 with a total of about 2,500 candidates participating.

No information of the identities of the selected astronaut candidates was provided. The CMSA operates under the People’s Liberation Army (PLA) and has previously restricted information flow regarding astronaut and mission selection.

Previous selection rounds in 1998 and 2010 were open to air force pilots only. The latest selection was opened to civilians, reflecting changing needs as China seeks to construct and operate

Read More
Read More

5 ways SpaceX is changing Crew Dragon flight for next NASA astronauts

  • SpaceX is set to launch four astronauts to the space station for NASA later this month.
  • After inspecting the data from its first astronaut flight, SpaceX made four big upgrades to its Crew Dragon spaceship.
  • The next capsule will have new maneuvering capabilities, a reinforced heat shield, longer-lasting solar panels, and better parachute-deployment sensors.
  • SpaceX is also promising a clearer ocean landing site without a crowd of boats.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

SpaceX showed the world that its Crew Dragon can safely carry NASA astronauts to and from space this summer.

Now the company is preparing the spaceship for its biggest feat yet: routine flights to and from the International Space Station.

SpaceX’s first mission for NASA was a test flight called Demo-2. It rocketed astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley into orbit, after which their Crew Dragon capsule docked to the space station. They stayed there

Read More
Read More

China is building a new rocket to fly its astronauts to the moon

China has revealed that it is working on a new rocket that could send astronauts to land on the moon.

The new launch vehicle was unveiled at the 2020 China Space Conference in Fuzhou, east China on Sept. 18. The new launcher is designed to send a 27.6 ton spacecraft into trans-lunar injection. Mass at liftoff will be about 4.85 million pounds, nearly triple that of China’s current largest rocket, the Long March 5.

Notably, the new rocket will feature three, 16.4-foot-diameter cores, in a style similar to two American rockets: United Launch Alliance’s Delta IV Heavy and SpaceX’s Falcon Heavy.

The as-yet-unnamed rocket will be 285 feet long, with a three-stage central core, and it is being designed at the China Academy of Launch Vehicle Technology (CALT) in Beijing.

Related: The latest news about China’s space program

“The world is seeing a new wave of lunar exploration, crewed or

Read More
Read More

Astronauts have to worry about radiation in space? Let’s stick to robots

This screen grab taken from video footage shows China's Jade Rabbit moon rover in 2013. <span class="copyright">(AFP Photo / CCTV )</span>
This screen grab taken from video footage shows China’s Jade Rabbit moon rover in 2013. (AFP Photo / CCTV )

To the editor: Data collected by a Chinese lunar lander on the far side of the moon show that radiation in outer space, which our atmosphere protects us from, could cause cancer in astronauts sent to the moon and Mars unless they are protected by thick-walled space vehicles or shelters.

Radiation danger to astronauts is not the only “dark side” of sending humans deep into space. Another is the enormous cost of these missions, which could absorb funds needed for infrastructure upgrades and investment in renewable energy.

Furthermore, sending humans to the moon and Mars serves no useful purpose. We would learn nothing new about the moon and Mars that we haven’t already learned from the robots that we have sent at a fraction of the cost of manned missions.

Read More
Read More

Six-month mission will test limits of SpaceX Dragon, astronauts say

Astronauts make round trip to space station from U.S. soil

NASA astronaut Douglas Hurley (C) waves to onlookers as he boards a plane at Naval Air Station Pensacola to return him and NASA astronaut Robert Behnken home to Houston a few hours after the duo landed in their SpaceX Crew Dragon Endeavour spacecraft off the coast of Pensacola, Fla,, on August 2, 2020. Photo by Bill Ingalls/NASA | License Photo

Read More
Read More

SpaceX Crew-1 astronauts name Dragon capsule ‘Resilience’

The next astronauts who will launch on a SpaceX capsule to the International Space Station looked to the present, rather than the past or the future, to select the name for their spacecraft.

NASA astronaut Michael Hopkins, commander of SpaceX’s Crew-1 mission to the space station, joined his three crewmates in revealing their ship’s call sign during a NASA press briefing held on Tuesday (Sept. 29).

“We’re excited about the opportunity to name our vehicle,” Hopkins said, speaking on behalf of he fellow Crew-1 astronauts, Victor Glover and Shannon Walker of NASA and Soichi Noguchi of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. “The Crew-1 Dragon capsule, no. 207, will henceforth be known by the call sign ‘Resilience.'”

Related: A behind-the-scenes look at SpaceX’s Crew Dragon capsule (photos)

SpaceX’s Crew-1 astronauts, including NASA astronauts Shannon Walker, Victor Glover and Michael Hopkins and JAXA astronaut

Read More
Read More

Six-month mission will test limits of SpaceX Dragon spacecraft, astronauts say

Astronauts make round trip to space station from U.S. soil

NASA astronaut Douglas Hurley (C) waves to onlookers as he boards a plane at Naval Air Station Pensacola to return him and NASA astronaut Robert Behnken home to Houston a few hours after the duo landed in their SpaceX Crew Dragon Endeavour spacecraft off the coast of Pensacola, Fla,, on August 2, 2020. Photo by Bill Ingalls/NASA | License Photo

Read More
Read More