The Atlantic Ocean Hasn’t Been This Hot in at Least 2,900 Years

Hurricane Florence as seen from the International Space Station.

Hurricane Florence as seen from the International Space Station.
Photo: NASA (Getty Images)

More than 20 years after intoning, “The water’s getting warm, so you might as well swim,” Smash Mouth’s “All Star” continues to be prophetic. Case in point: A new study finds that the Atlantic Ocean just had its hottest decade in at least 2,900 years. Someone award Smash Mouth a PhD and calculate the h-index of their discography immediately.

The new findings, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on Monday, rely on a mix of ice and sediment cores as well as thermometer data to track the state of the Atlantic. The ocean has gone through a well-known up-and-down swing in sea surface temperature, known as the Atlantic multidecadal oscillation. Plotted over hundreds of years, the AMO looks like a pretty steady wave pattern. In its warm phase, it

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The Atlantic hurricane season isn’t over yet

But it’s 2020, and the Atlantic may have other ideas. A weather pattern that encourages air masses to rise, leading to increased showers and thunderstorms, looks likely to overspread the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean by late in the month into early November. This pattern change could once again raise the odds of tropical development, provided other air and ocean ingredients are present as well.

In a typical storm season, the Atlantic averages one named storm after Oct. 19, which would suggest that even in an average year we wouldn’t be quite done yet. However, this season is anything but typical, considering we are pacing more than a month ahead of the busiest season on record, which occurred in 2005, and have dipped into the Greek alphabet for only the second time.

It’s plausible that the Atlantic basin may cap off its hyperactive season with a robust final act.

Near-term

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Tropical Storm Gamma becomes latest named storm in Atlantic basin

Tropical Storm Gamma became the 24th named storm in the Atlantic basin this season. Previously dubbed Tropical Depression 25, the system’s maximum sustained winds had strengthened to 40 mph by 7 p.m. PDT Friday.

Tropical Depression 25 formed late Friday morning amid an area of disturbed weather over the northwestern Caribbean that meteorologists have had their eyes on since the demise of Beta, Sally, Teddy and Paulette. The system had initially been dubbed Invest 91L by the National Hurricane Center (NHC).

As of Friday evening, the tropical storm was moving in a northwestward direction at 9 mph, about 135 miles south-southeast of Cozumel, Mexico.

Mexico’s government has issued a tropical storm warning for the country’s Yucatan Peninsula from the coastal communities of Punta Herrero to Cabo Catoche. A tropical storm watch has been issued for areas south of Punta Herrero to Puerto Costa Maya and west of Cabo Catoche to

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Tropical Atlantic begins to awaken as October looms

Twenty-three named storms have whirled their way across the Atlantic basin so far this season, exhausting the naming list used by meteorologists and forcing then to dip into the Greek alphabet for only the second time in history. While the majority of systems have been relatively weak and unremarkable, some, like Category 4 Laura and Category 2 Sally, have caused significant damage.

Now, October promises to bring another round of weather that must be watched, as a combination of large-scale atmospheric circulations overlap to enhance tropical weather activity. The focus is already on the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico, which tend to prove to be autumn hot spots for storms. In fact, one or two weather systems there could already be in the works.

System to watch for the Yucatán Peninsula; heavy rainfall possible in Florida

On Wednesday, a strip of low pressure oriented from south to north was sauntering

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Lightbridge CEO to Discuss Innovative Nuclear Technology on Atlantic Council’s EnergySource Innovation Stream

The MarketWatch News Department was not involved in the creation of this content.

RESTON, Va., Sep 15, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE via COMTEX) —
‘EnergySource Innovation Stream with Lightbridge’ Scheduled for Streaming on September 17 at 8:30 a.m. (Eastern Time)

Lightbridge Corporation (Nasdaq: LTBR) an advanced nuclear fuel technology company, today announced that President and CEO Seth Grae will join the Atlantic Council’s EnergySource Innovation Stream online series as the featured guest on Thursday, September 17 at 8:30 a.m. (Eastern Time).

The Atlantic Council’s Global Energy Center launched the EnergySource Innovation Stream to highlight new energy technologies with the potential to reshape the global energy system through discussions with companies and individuals working diligently to bring those innovations to market at scale.

Mr. Grae will explain how the ongoing global race for nuclear technology innovation has positioned Lightbridge Fuel(TM) as a potential game-changer, helping solve energy, climate, and security problems–soon enough

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