Vedanta falls 10% after delisting attempt fails

BENGALURU (Reuters) – Shares of Vedanta Ltd fell 10% on Monday as the miner’s attempt to buy back shares and delist itself failed, forcing it to return all the shares tendered as part of the process.

Over the weekend, the company said https://bit.ly/36SWyBq the delisting process failed as it did not get the required number of shares needed. For a successful delisting, 1.34 billion shares had to be tendered, while the company received just 1.25 billion shares.

Group chairman and billionaire Anil Agarwal told https://bit.ly/2GMjhUY CNBC-TV18 on Friday the company will go for a counter offer if it was needed.

Vedanta shares fell to 109.70 rupees apiece on Monday. Since the delisting announcement was made in May, the shares have risen nearly 37% as of last close.

The company’s parent, Vedanta Resources Ltd , which owns 36.80% of the Indian unit, had then said it would delist and take the

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Twitter’s ‘Birdwatch’ looks like a new attempt to root out propaganda and misinformation

Twitter has confirmed it’s working on a new feature, currently dubbed “Birdwatch,” that could let the Twitter community warn one another about misleading tweets that could cause harm.

There’s an awful lot we don’t know about the idea, including whether Twitter will actually release it to the public or how it might work in its final form, but enough has leaked out that we do have a pretty fair glimpse at the feature — which, we understand, is still early in development and would not be released ahead of the US election.

As TechCrunch notes, the existence of such a tool was first discovered by Jane Manchun Wong, who often digs through app code for evidence of unreleased features, back in August. At a basic level, the idea is that you’ll be able to attach a note to a misleading tweet:

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SpaceX aborts Starlink satellite launch attempt

NASA Astronaut Chris Cassidy, serving as commander of the Expedition 63 mission aboard the International Space Station, took these photos of Hurricane Laura as it continued to strengthen in the Gulf of Mexico on August 25. Photo courtesy of NASA | License Photo

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OSIRIS-REx will attempt its first asteroid sample collection next month

NASA’s OSIRIS-REx spacecraft is almost ready to touch down on the asteroid Bennu, NASA announced today. On October 20th, OSIRIS-REx will make its first attempt at collecting a sample of the asteroid’s rocks and dust. This will be the first time NASA has collected pieces of an asteroid and the largest sample return from space since the Apollo program.

OSIRIS-REx is about the size of a large van, and it will touch down in a sampling area that is about the size of a few parking spaces — 52 feet in diameter. The area is surrounded by building-sized boulders, which could make the landing a bit more challenging. 

Once OSIRIS-REx has landed, a robotic sampling arm will perform Touch-And-Go (TAG) collection. The mission is to collect at least two ounces, or 60 grams, of rocky material. If the first TAG attempt in October does not collect enough material, OSIRIS-REx has

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Can technology predict wildfires? New systems attempt to better forecast their spread



a factory with smoke coming out of it: Flames burn near power lines in Sycamore Canyon in Montecito in 2017. Utilities are turning to computer modeling to predict where their equipment poses the greatest fire threat. (Mike Eliason / Associated Press)


© (Mike Eliason / Associated Press)
Flames burn near power lines in Sycamore Canyon in Montecito in 2017. Utilities are turning to computer modeling to predict where their equipment poses the greatest fire threat. (Mike Eliason / Associated Press)

When freak lightning storms passed over Northern California’s wine country last month and sparked hundreds of wildfires, a newly established network of remote weather stations, orbiting satellites and supercomputers spun into action and attempted to predict the spread of what is now known as the LNU Lightning Complex fire.

Firefighters and technologists have long dreamed of a formula or device that would accurately predict the spread of fire, much the way meteorologists predict the possible impact of extreme weather, but it’s only recently that big data and supercomputers have begun to show promise as a means of fire forecasting.

“I think a firefighter starting out today in his or her career,

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