In Mayo’s hometown, DFLers look to put science, and Trump’s response to COVID-19, on the ballot

For Republicans in key state Senate races across Greater Minnesota, running alongside Donald Trump could be an asset given the president’s strength outside of the Twin Cities metro area. So much so that Democrats in places like Moorhead, Bemidji and St. Cloud haven’t put the president front and center in their races.

Rochester is different.

In Senate District 26, which includes much of Med City and a more rural slice of Olmsted County, Democrat and retired Mayo Clinic doctor Aleta Borrud hopes to tie three-term Republican Sen. Carla Nelson to Trump — and particularly to the president’s handling of the COVID-19 pandemic. It’s a bet that the district, home to Mayo and a legion of medical professionals, opposes Trump and the GOP’s response to the coronavirus enough that they will oust Nelson in the Nov. 3 election.

“Somebody who is supporting and allying with somebody who is anti-science really speaks

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What is proposition 22? The ballot measure that could determine the future of Uber and Lyft in California

The ballot measure, known as Proposition 22, would establish drivers as an independent class of workers with access to limited job benefits, along with wage and worker protections they’ve so far lacked under the gig economy model. Labor groups and many of driver advocates say the companies’ efforts, however, do not go far enough to protect workers and are merely an attempt, cloaked in friendly marketing materials, to quash a new law that would guarantee drivers access to the minimum wage, employer-provided health care and bargaining rights.

Drawing on a more than $186 million campaign war chest that Uber, Lyft, food delivery app DoorDash and other tech companies have raised, they are seeking to convince California voters that the ballot initiative reflects the will of drivers. They’ve cited limited survey data saying the vast majority of drivers want to remain contractors.

But critics see the measure as a last-ditch effort

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This multimillion dollar CA ballot measure could decide the future of gig work

Sam Harnett:

Absolutely. So, you know, this the issue that’s playing out in California over where, how to classify these drivers is playing out in every other state in the country and actually global and different in different countries around the world. So everyone is looking to California to see what’s going to happen.

Now, the thing is that the way the propositions were written is that it only applies to people working on platforms, doing delivery or transportation companies like Uber, Lyft, also Postmates, DoorDash.

So it’s limited in who it’s targeting now. But if you create this precedent of having a basic third option between employee and contractor, this kind of contractor, and we didn’t explain this, but the proposition would give them contractor status with slightly improved benefits, slightly better wages, some health supplements, some insurance to drive a certain amount of hours. So the point is,

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NASA astronaut plans to cast her ballot from space station

ATLANTA (AP) — NASA astronaut Kate Rubins told The Associated Press on Friday that she plans to cast her next vote from space – more than 200 miles above Earth.

Rubins is just outside Moscow in Star City, Russia, preparing with two cosmonauts for a mid-October launch and a six-month stay at the International Space Station.

“I think it’s really important for everybody to vote,” Rubins said. “If we can do it from space, then I believe folks can do it from the ground, too.”

Most U.S. astronauts live in Houston. Texas law allows them to vote from space using a secure electronic ballot. Mission Control forwards the ballot to the space station and relays the completed ballot back to the county clerk.


“It’s critical to participate in our democracy,” Rubins said. “We consider it an honor to be able to vote from space.”

NASA astronauts have voted from space

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NASA Astronaut Plans To Cast Her Ballot From Space

Topline

NASA astronaut Kate Rubins, who is training for a six-month mission scheduled to launch in October, says she plans to cast her next vote from space.

Key Facts

“It’s critical to participate in our democracy,” Rubins told the Associated Press Friday, adding that astronauts “consider it an honor to be able to vote from space.”

NASA’s Mission Control Center in Houston sends a secure electronic ballot to the astronauts who send it back and the control center then emails it to the County Clerk’s Office to be recorded.  

The voting process starts a year before launch, when astronauts select which elections they want to participate in, and then submit an absentee ballot request six months before the elections, NASA says.

Key Background

Rubins joined NASA in 2009. She completed her first spaceflight in 2016 as an Expedition 48/49 crew

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