Amazon bets on Prime Day in Latin America to battle local rivals

By Daina Beth Solomon



a close up of a sign: FILE PHOTO: The logo of Amazon is seen at their new warehouse during its opening announcement on the outskirts of Mexico City


© Reuters/CARLOS JASSO
FILE PHOTO: The logo of Amazon is seen at their new warehouse during its opening announcement on the outskirts of Mexico City

MEXICO CITY (Reuters) – Amazon.com Inc’s total sales have soared during the coronavirus pandemic, yet in Latin America, the world’s biggest online retailer is locked in a dogfight with local rivals as it rolls out its Prime Day event in Mexico and, for the first time, Brazil.

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During the Tuesday and Wednesday annual shopping event that spans 19 countries, the company will again showcase the discounts and free shipping that come along with a paid Prime membership – a strategy that has helped Amazon reel in repeat shoppers around the world.

Even so, analysts say Amazon faces an uphill battle in Latin America’s top two economies, where success or failure will set the bar for whether it can take

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It’s Time For Startups To Use AI To Battle Tech Giants In Patent Wars

Technology giants such as Alibaba and IBM are eating startup innovators’ lunch. These behemoths are seeking to devour even more market share by publishing patents at unprecedented speed in emerging technologies such as blockchain.

As some of the richest companies on the planet, the corporations have the resources to manage the laborious search of existing patents and to overcome the outdated administrative hurdles so that they can file for intellectual property rights.

Patents are definitely old school. Patent laws started with the rise of the nation-state, so they began in the 18th century and were then fully developed in the 19th century. Some changes may have been made to reflect new technologies, but the basic patent laws haven’t evolved to meet the needs of the 21st century.

We’re patenting ideas based on today’s high-tech of artificial intelligence and blockchain with laws that were established centuries ago.

All this puts early-growth

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The ripple effect of the Epic Games v. Apple battle royale

It was only five years ago that Epic Games’ Josh Adam and Bill Bramer were onstage at Apple’s WWDC demoing Fortnite and talking about how incredible the iOS platform is for developers. Unless you’ve been hiding under a rock, you know where this is going.

The legal and public relations battle that Epic launched against Apple for delisting its app from their stores demonstrates a clear rebellion against the power of the platform that it once headlined.

Epic Games isn’t David fighting Goliath. Sure, it’s fiscally insignificant compared to Apple: revenue of $4.2 billion in 2019 versus Apple’s $260.2 billion. But we’re still talking billions, and it will have an impact far beyond these two companies.

In the beginning, Epic looked like it was taking a stand against injustice and representing all gaming companies who suffer that 30% cut in revenue on all in-app transactions. But the longer this goes

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Microsoft Edge Declares Battle With Chrome With These Excellent New Features

Microsoft Edge has declared battle with its biggest rival Google Chrome with a bunch of excellent new features for businesses and consumers.

Microsoft Edge browser is growing in popularity—it’s number two to Google’s Chrome. Now, Edge is hoping to further grow its market share with the launch of a plethora of new features.

So, what’s new? Many of the Edge features are aimed at making shopping online easier and more private in the run up to the holiday season as most people shun the shops due to coronavirus. 

In a blog, Microsoft detailed new Edge features including price comparison in Collections to help you find the best deals. You can use this in Edge by adding a product to a Collection

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Joni Ernst, Theresa Greenfield battle for seat

Democratic senate candidate Theresa Greenfield (L) and Senator Joni Ernst, R-IA (R).

Caroline Brehman | CQ-Roll Call, Inc. | Getty Images

Republican Joni Ernst minced no words in her first televised ad of her successful Senate bid in 2014.

“I grew up castrating hogs on an Iowa farm. So when I get to Washington, I’ll know how to cut pork,” the then-state senator says in the ad before the camera cuts to footage of pigs. “Washington’s full of big spenders. Let’s make ’em squeal.”

When Iowa voters cast their ballots in 2020, they’ll decide whether Ernst has lived up to that promise during her six years in Washington.

Ernst has become a reliable Republican vote in the Senate, voting against her party only 3.4% of the time in the current legislative session, according to data compiled by ProPublica. The average Senate Republican voted against the party 4.3% of the time

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The German Car Industry Musters for a New Tech Battle

Having spent years—and tens of billions of dollars—preparing for a shift in production toward electric vehicles, German car makers are expressing a new angst: that digitally “connected cars” could prove even more disruptive to their traditional strengths. This second leg of their race against Tesla could become a fresh excuse to squander investors’ capital.

Daimler set two priorities for technological leadership in a new strategy for its

Mercedes-Benz


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brand this week: electric drive and car software. For the latter, the company is working on an entire operating system, MB.OS, that from 2024 will run not just Mercedes’s proprietary infotainment system and its mobile broadband connection but also crucial elements of the driving experience, including self-driving features and battery management.

The company will partner with technology specialists for specific applications, notably

Nvidia

for automated driving. Yet the closer the software gets to the customer experience, the more Daimler wants

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Supreme Court Hears Copyright Battle Between Google and Oracle

WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court considered on Wednesday whether Google should have to pay Oracle billions of dollars in a long-running lawsuit over software used on many of the world’s smartphones, wrestling during a lively argument with the potentially enormous implications of what has been called the copyright case of the decade.

Several justices noted how consequential a decision in the case could be. “I’m concerned,” Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr. told a lawyer for Google, “that, under your argument, all computer code is at risk of losing protection.”

Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. noted the opposite concern. “We’re told that if we agree with Oracle, we will ruin our tech industry in the United States,” he said.

The justices heard the argument by telephone, and they used a series of low-tech analogies to test the two sides’ arguments. Their questions included ones on safecracking, football playbooks, typewriter keyboards,

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What Is Fair Use? Google vs. Oracle Brings Decade-Long Copyright Battle To Supreme Court

KEY POINTS

  • Oral arguments were held before the Supreme Court over the copyright case between Oracle and Google
  • Google stands to pay Oracle nearly $9 billion for 11,000 lines of code in Android software if the court rules in Oracle’s favor
  • Big tech is throwing in behind Google while media and entertainment companies and the Trump administration is backing Oracle

The Supreme Court faces upending the tech industry by determining whether Google stole code from Oracle in building its Android operating system in a case that could redefine the meaning of the fair use doctrine. All eight justices on Wednesday grilled the tech giants’ legal teams as well the U.S. deputy solicitor general in a potentially far-reaching case.

Google said its incorporation of 11,500 lines of Oracle Java code constitutes fair use, while Oracle argued the action violated its ownership rights. The lawsuit has been working its way through the

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Supreme Court wrestles with Google-Oracle copyright battle that could upend tech industry

WASHINGTON – The Supreme Court wrestled at length Wednesday over a $9 billion copyright battle between tech giants Google and Oracle that has gone on for a decade.

4 Big Tech CEOs draw scrutiny on Capitol Hill

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But after an extended, 90-minute oral argument conducted by telephone in deference to the COVID-19 pandemic, several justices indicated their solution might be to send the case back to a lower court for even more review.

A majority of justices appeared to doubt that Google had the right to copy some of Oracle’s Java programming language to create Android, the world’s most popular mobile software. But they worried that a ruling against Google could set back software innovation by requiring costly duplication.



logo: The Supreme Court agreed to hear a multi-billion dollar copyright dispute between Google and Oracle.


© KAREN BLEIER, AFP/Getty Images
The Supreme Court agreed to hear a multi-billion dollar copyright dispute between Google and Oracle.

Start the day smarter. Get all

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Vizient Provides Guidance to Hospitals on New Technologies to Battle COVID-19 Pandemic

Vizient, Inc. released three new evidence-based reports providing a comprehensive overview and guidance to hospitals on the appropriate implementation of emerging innovative technologies for helping to care for COVID-19 patients. These reports, targeted at hospitals dealing with the COVID-19 pandemic, address immediate needs for the care of patients during the crisis.

“The COVID-19 pandemic has created an environment where hospitals are being compelled to consider novel technologies that can help them manage their patients more efficiently and improve outcomes,” said Joe Cummings, technology program director at Vizient. “These reports provide insight to help health care providers identify and evaluate new technologies that may be vital in the fight against COVID-19.”

Devices to Assist Ventilator Weaning in COVID-19 Patients

With mechanical ventilation often required in seriously ill COVID-19 patients, weaning patients from ventilators can be a prolonged process complicated by disuse atrophy of the respiratory muscles. Studies have shown that 30%

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