Intel just revealed a surprise new processor to beat AMD Ryzen in budget gaming PCs

Intel’s Core i3-10100F is a new spin on a Comet Lake processor which has just been spotted online, and should soon be on its way to make a tempting option for a budget gaming PC.

The CPU has just been listed on Intel’s Ark product database with a launch date of Q4, but the chip giant hasn’t announced anything official about the processor or when it might hit shelves yet.

As spotted by Tom’s Hardware, it’s a quad-core (eight-thread) processor with a base clock of 3.6GHz and boost to 4.3GHz, and will retail between $79 and $97, offering a seriously good value proposition in terms of price/performance for an affordable gaming PC. With a 65W TDP, it’ll also be easy to keep this CPU cool.

Currently, its predecessor the Core i3-9100F sells for not much more than $70, and you’re getting a lot of chip for the money – even

Read More
Read More

Beat Future Infectious Diseases by Crowdsourcing Strategic Data

By Rich Murr, CIO, Epicor Software

To blunt the impact of COVID-19, a vast number of medical, industrial, and financial resources are being deployed. And while these efforts are important, we should also look ahead so that we are better able to prevent future pandemics by crowdsourcing strategic, available data that would offer a bigger picture.

As someone who previously served in the United States Marines and who now serves as a CIO for a software company, I can emphatically say that regardless of your line of work, one of the best first lines of defense is information – specifically, quality information that can be speedily obtained and assessed. In the case of fighting infectious diseases, this information is critical for our epidemiologists. They need information so that we can combat potential threats before they become widespread.

It’s clear that relying solely on closed societies, public health institutions, or the

Read More
Read More

A Chemist Aims to Beat a Trump-Loving Republican on Long Island

Democratic House candidate Nancy Goroff in the lab.

Democratic House candidate Nancy Goroff in the lab.
Photo: Goroff for Congress

That “I believe in science” and “I believe in using facts and evidence to solve problems” are rallying cries for a political campaign says a lot about 2020. Yet that’s the pitch of Nancy Goroff, a chemist at Stony Brook University who is the Democratic nominee taking on Rep. Lee Zeldin in a Long Island district.

That appeal to science-based decision-making speaks to the hellscape of modern America that Republicans have created. The Trump administration is the culmination of those efforts, having spent nearly four years sidelining science to disastrous consequences. That includes the acute crisis of a pandemic that has left the U.S. with the highest death toll in the world and one of the highest per capita death rates of any developing country. Hell, the president came down with it after holding a superspreader event.

Read More
Read More

Hold Dish Network Stock For 6 Months To Beat The Market

Dish Network stock (NASDAQ: DISH) dropped 14% in the last one month to $28 currently. The decline was in line with the sell-off in the technology and cable industry over recent weeks. But will the company’s stock continue its downward trajectory over the coming weeks, or is a recovery in the stock imminent?

According to the Trefis Machine Learning Engine, which identifies trends in the company’s stock price data for the last 20 years, returns for Dish Network stock average 1.5% in the next one-month (21 trading days) period after experiencing a 14% drop over the previous month (21 trading days). Notably, though, the stock is very likely to outperform the S&P500 over the

Read More
Read More

New Zealand PM says ‘we beat the virus again’

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern declared on Monday New Zealand “beat the virus again” and announced restrictions in the country’s largest city would be eased, after a second Covid-19 wave was contained.

The virus was believed to have been eradicated in late May after a strict national lockdown led to New Zealanders enjoying 102 days without community transmission. 

But a new cluster emerged in Auckland in August, forcing the city of 1.5 million into lockdown for almost three weeks.

With no new confirmed cases in Auckland for 12 days, Ardern said Monday the virus was now under control and congratulated residents for enduring the second lockdown.

“It felt longer and dragged on in what was already starting to feel like a very long year,” she said.

“But despite this, Aucklanders and New Zealanders stuck to the plan that has worked twice now, and beat the virus again.” 

Ardern said from late

Read More
Read More

Microsoft Teams Confirms Superb New Updates And Features To Beat Zoom

Microsoft’s Teams had a very busy September adding a host of new features. Now, the firm is looking to improve the performance of its Teams service as it continues in the battle to beat Zoom in the video conferencing space.

In an update detailing the features added in September, Microsoft explained how it was trying to improve Teams’ performance as a large proportion of the workforce continue to work from home.

Microsoft says it’s working to ensure businesses and schools “have a high-performance experience that scales across their devices and levels of internet connectivity.”

Performance improvements in Teams 

For times when there is

Read More
Read More

Vivo V20 to beat Pixel 5, Pixel 4a 5G as first smartphone with Android 11 out of the box



graphical user interface


© Provided by BGR.in


Google officially launched Android 11 in early September. However, so far, the operating system is only available as an upgrade to Pixel users (Pixel 2, 3, 3a, 4, 4a) plus official betas for some models from OnePlus (8 and 8 Pro), Oppo (X2 and Reno 3), Realme (X50 Pro) and Xiaomi (Mi 10 and Mi 10 Pro). Now, with the arrival of the first devices with Android 11 pre-installed on the market, that is about to change.

Read More
Read More

Einstein’s description of gravity just got much harder to beat — ScienceDaily

Einstein’s theory of general relativity — the idea that gravity is matter warping spacetime — has withstood over 100 years of scrutiny and testing, including the newest test from the Event Horizon Telescope collaboration, published today in the latest issue of Physical Review Letters.

According to the findings, Einstein’s theory just got 500 times harder to beat.

Despite its successes, Einstein’s robust theory remains mathematically irreconcilable with quantum mechanics, the scientific understanding of the subatomic world. Testing general relativity is important because the ultimate theory of the universe must encompass both gravity and quantum mechanics.

“We expect a complete theory of gravity to be different from general relativity, but there are many ways one can modify it. We found that whatever the correct theory is, it can’t be significantly different from general relativity when it comes to black holes. We really squeezed down the space of possible modifications,” said

Read More
Read More

Curly the Curling Robot Can Beat the Pros at Their Own Game | Smart News

The sport of curling requires such precision and strategy that it’s sometimes referred to as “chess on ice.” Players push 40-pound stones across frozen sheets, rotating the stones just enough that they “curl,” and try to knock opposing teams’ stones out of central rings.

Subtle variables at play—tiny, ever-changing bumps in ice, the pressure exerted by one’s hand, the smoothness of the stone—all impact the outcome, so much that curling requires machine-like precision from its players.

So, it makes sense that an actual machine might have a shot at winning, if it could learn to strategize on its own. Enter Curly: a robot powered by artificial intelligence (AI) that recently competed against professional South Korean curling teams and won three out of four official matches.

Curly’s impressive feat is recounted in an article published this month in Science Robotics by researchers Seong-Whan Lee and Dong-Ok Won of Korea University and

Read More
Read More

Micron Technology Falls After Hours Despite Q4 Earnings Beat

Micron Technology (NASDAQ:MU) shares were taking a hit late Tuesday afternoon, following the company’s release of its fourth quarter of fiscal 2020 results after market hours.

For the quarter, the computer and mobile device memory maker actually posted encouraging fundamentals. Revenue for the period came in at $6.06 billion, a sturdy 24% higher than the same period in 2019. Non-GAAP (adjusted) net profit nearly doubled, to just under $1.23 billion ($1.08) from the year-ago result of $637 million.

Both results comfortably topped analyst estimates. Collectively, prognosticators tracking the stock were modeling $5.89 billion on the top line, and an adjusted per-share net profit of $0.98.

Two hands pulling out the guts of a USB stick.

Image source: Getty Images.

However, Micron’s guidance fell short of expectations. The company is estimating that for first quarter 2021, it will book revenue of $5.0 billion to $5.4 billion, and adjusted net earnings of $0.40 to $0.54 per share. While the former range encompasses

Read More
Read More