Future Returns: Investing in a New Consumer Behavior Era

Anticipating fiscal reactions to the shifts in consumer behavior caused by the Covid-19 crisis isn’t easy. But careful observers can find plenty of indicators for how people live and spend money in the new normal.

It’s important to keep in mind many changes, despite the circumstances, aren’t from left field. Nathan
Cockrell
, co-director of global research at Lazard Asset Management characterizes what we’re seeing as a fast-forward of shifts that were already underway.

“On the offline-to-online transition, this looks like it has created a step change, but the direction of travel was already established,” he says. “The longer that Covid has gone on, the more likely it is that enforced changes in consumer habits become learned and persistent. I definitely subscribe to the idea that something’s changed that is somewhat irreversible.”

He uses the example of China’s consumption, which has largely recovered back to 2019 levels. There, online channels

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COVID-19 Is Changing Consumer Behavior At The Point-Of-Sale

As shelter-in-place orders spread across the US in mid-March, cash was already coming under fire as a potential vehicle for spreading COVID-19. Media articles and nightly news reports quickly began targeting the unsanitary aspects of physical currency, and many merchants started affixing signs to their storefronts or checkouts encouraging the use of cards, and in some cases outright banning cash. 

These developments, paired with growing concerns about physical contact and contagions, have helped drive a noticeable decline in cash utilization, according to a Q3 2020 US consumer survey fielded by 451 Research, which is part of S&P Global Market Intelligence. The survey revealed that more than two in five consumers are using cash less often since the COVID-19 outbreak started. The decline is strongest for respondents with a household income above $150,000 and those belonging to Gen X (38-53 years old), where 64% and 54% have decreased their usage, respectively.

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NASA, SpaceX Delay Crew-1 Mission Due To ‘Off-Nominal Behavior’ From Falcon 9

KEY POINTS

  • NASA and SpaceX’s crewed mission has been delayed to November
  • The agency cited “off-nominal behavior” from the Falcon 9’s engine
  • The delay can provide more time to ensure the mission’s safety

NASA and SpaceX’s Crew-1 has been delayed due to “off-nominal” behavior from the Falcon 9.

It was in May when NASA and SpaceX successfully launched astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley to the International Space Station (ISS), marking the first time that American astronauts launched from American soil in nearly a decade. But that successful mission was just a demonstration and the first actual crewed operational flight of a Crew Dragon spacecraft, the Crew-1 mission, was set for a late October launch following several delays.

But on Oct. 1, NASA released a statement on the Crew-1 mission, noting a new target of “no sooner than early-to-mid November.” The agency cited “off-nominal behavior” from the Falcon 9’s first

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Yelp Will Add Racist Behavior Tags to Business Pages

Illustration for article titled Yelp Will Now Advise Customers When a Business Is Racist Enough to Land in the News

Screenshot: Yelp

Yelp will now warn customers that they’re looking at a “business accused of racist behavior”—just so long as it’s been racist enough to warrant a mention in the news.

The review platform announced in a blog post Thursday that it will place an alert on a business page when a business “gains public attention” such as a news article documenting “egregious, racist actions from a business owner or employee, such as using overtly racist language or symbols.” Previously, Yelp implemented a “Public Attention Alert” feature that informed visitors that a business may be at the center of a controversy involving racism, but that alert didn’t specify whether the business was the source of the bigoted behavior or the target.

“As the nation reckons with issues of systemic racism, we’ve seen in the last few months that there is a clear need to warn consumers about

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Yelp Is Going To Start Flagging Restaurants That Have Been Accused Of Racist Behavior On Its App

Photo credit: Yelp
Photo credit: Yelp

From Delish

Yelp announced in a blog post yesterday that it would begin flagging businesses that have been accused of racially charged behavior on the app. Consumer alerts are already placed on businesses that see an influx of reviews based on news coverage or social media rather than first hand experience, and the new alert will specify when the allegations are related to racist behavior.

“At Yelp, we value diversity, inclusion and belonging, both internally and on our platform, which means we have a zero tolerance policy to racism. We know these values are important to our users and now more than ever, consumers are increasingly conscious of the types of businesses they patronize and support,” the brand said in the site blog post.

In order to flag these situations while also maintaining the integrity of the app, businesses that are associated with someone who has been

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Has COVID-19 knocked us onto our backsides? Researchers study pandemic’s effects on physical activity and sedentary behavior — ScienceDaily

Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, most universities across the United States transitioned from face-to-face classes to remote learning, closed campuses and sent students home this past spring. Such changes, coupled with social distancing guidelines, have altered social interactions and limited our access to fitness facilities, parks and gymnasiums. This is concerning as positive social interaction and access to exercise facilities both promote physical activity. Recently, a group of Kent State University researchers sought to examine the impact of these pandemic-related changes upon physical activity and sedentary behavior, specifically sitting, across the university population.

Kent State’s College of Education, Health and Human Services professors Jacob Barkley, Ph.D., Andrew Lepp, Ph.D., and Ellen Glickman, Ph.D., along with current and former Kent State doctoral students Greg Farnell, Ph.D., Jake Beiting, Ryan Wiet and Bryan Dowdell, Ph.D., assessed the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on physical activity and sedentary behavior. More than 400 college

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Ancient Sharks’ Cannibalistic Behavior May Have Helped Them Become Giants

KEY POINTS

  • Megalodons grew to be up to 50 feet in length
  • The prehistoric sharks were the biggest among the carnivorous or non-planktivorous shark species
  • Researchers say a unique behavior called intrauterine cannibalism may have helped megalodons grow very large

The ancient megalodon sharks’ predatory behavior inside the womb might have helped them achieve their gigantic size, a new study shows. The shark species grew to be up to 50 feet in length before going extinct about 3.6 million years ago.

In a study published in the journal Historical Biology, a team of researchers explained that most sharks give birth through a method known as ovoviviparity, where the embryos develop inside eggs that remain inside the mother’s body until they are ready to be hatched. In some aggressive shark types like lamniform, the early-hatched embryos often eat the unhatched eggs, a behavior called intrauterine cannibalism, the researchers noted. Megalodons belong

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The Intersection of Technology and Behavior

In the movie “Back to the Future II,” protagonist Marty McFly travels forward to the year 2015. During a quick stop at Café 80s, Marty encounters two children, confused by the 80s-style arcade game in the store. When Marty shows them how to play, the kids retort with, “You mean you have to use your hands?”

We may soon have a generation of young internet users that quip, “You mean you have to use wires?”

Wireless LAN, Bluetooth connectivity or mobile data transfer (which will explode with the wider deployment of 5G) are ubiquitous today. So what does this mean to the everyday person? And what can the everyday person, along with their enterprise, do to minimize threats against their data? Today’s behavior means anyone can learn to handle some of their own cybersecurity problems when it comes to personal or corporate email and access concerns. 

For proof that we

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