Active ETF Trailblazer WBI to Ring The Closing Bell

WBI celebrates 6 years since record-breaking ETF launch

WBI will ring The Closing Bell® at the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) on Thursday, October 8, 2020. The virtual ceremony commemorates the firm’s initial launch into the ETF space in 2014.

“We are excited to be part of The Closing Bell® virtual ceremony. Six years ago, WBI had the largest single day ETF launch in history. We are excited to be a small piece of the New York Stock Exchange’s innovative history. This year is an exciting year for active ETFs, our suite of active (transparent) and risk-managed ETFs have helped investors navigate 2020’s volatile markets,” said Don Schreiber, Jr., Founder and Co-CEO of WBI.

In 2014, WBI launched a suite of active transparent ETFs with the firm’s time-tested dynamic trailing stops that seek to reduce loss of capital. The strategies have no mandate to be fully invested and

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The Mother of Pulsars: Jocelyn Bell Burnell and the squiggle that changed science

Jocelyn Bell Burnell in 1968.


Daily Herald Archive/SSPL/Getty Images

In 1967, when she was just 24 years old, Jocelyn Bell Burnell saw a quarter-inch-long “squiggle” on a piece of paper that would change her life and reshape the course of astrophysics. 

Bell Burnell was working on her Ph.D. at Cambridge at the time, reading signals from a radio telescope in the hope of finding quasars — supermassive black holes, millions of times the size of our sun, that spew out huge amounts of energy from billions of light-years away. 

As part of her Ph.D. research, Bell Burnell had helped build a telescope to receive these signals from across the universe. It was known as the Interplanetary Scintillation Array — a radio telescope made up of 2,000 metal antennas and 120 miles of cable and wires, all strung up on more than 1,000 wooden posts. The entire thing covered an area

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Jocelyn Bell Burnell and the squiggle that changed science

In 1967, when she was just 24 years old, Jocelyn Bell Burnell saw a quarter-inch-long “squiggle” on a piece of paper that would change her life and reshape the course of astrophysics. 



a woman wearing sunglasses posing for the camera: Jocelyn Bell Burnell in 1968. Daily Herald Archive/SSPL/Getty Images


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Jocelyn Bell Burnell in 1968. Daily Herald Archive/SSPL/Getty Images

Bell Burnell was working on her Ph.D. at Cambridge at the time, reading signals from a radio telescope in the hope of finding quasars — supermassive black holes, millions of times the size of our sun, that spew out huge amounts of energy from billions of light-years away. 

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As part of her Ph.D. research, Bell Burnell had helped build a telescope to receive these signals from across the universe. It was known as the Interplanetary Scintillation Array — a radio telescope made up of 2,000 metal antennas and 120 miles of cable and wires, all strung up on more than 1,000 wooden posts.

Read More
Read More