New eclipsing double white dwarf binary discovered

New eclipsing double white dwarf binary discovered
Pan-STARRS1 color giy-bands image of ZTF J2243+5242, which is the blue object in the center of the image. Credit: Burdge et al., 2020.

Astronomers from the California Institute of Technology and elsewhere report the detection of a new eclipsing detached double white dwarf binary. The system, designated ZTF J2243+5242 has an orbital period of below 10 minutes, which makes it one of the shortest-period eclipsing binaries known to date. The finding is detailed in a paper published October 7 on arXiv.org.


Astronomers are interested in finding and studying double white dwarfs (DWDs), as their mergers are believed to produce new white dwarfs with higher masses. It is assumed that some high-mass white dwarfs in the solar neighborhood could be DWD merger products.

The Zwicky Transient Facility (ZTF), using the Palomar Observatory in California, is one of the most important astronomical surveys to search for double white dwarf binary systems. So

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Stepping ‘beyond binary’ to store data in more than just 0s and 1s — ScienceDaily

Electronic data is being produced at a breath-taking rate.

The total amount of data stored in data centres around the globe is of the order of ten zettabytes (a zettabyte is a trillion gigabytes), and we estimate that amount doubles every couple of years.

With 8% of global electricity already being consumed in information and communication technology (ICT), low-energy data-storage is a key priority.

To date there is no clear winner in the race for next-generation memory that is non-volatile, has great endurance, highly energy efficient, low cost, high density, and allows fast access operation.

The joint international team comprehensively reviews ‘multi-state memory’ data storage, which steps ‘beyond binary’ to store more data than just 0s and 1s.

MULTI-STATE MEMORY: MORE THAN JUST ZEROES AND ONES

Multi-state memory is an extremely promising technology for future data storage, with the ability to store data in more than a single bit (ie,

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What Are Trans-Neptunian Objects? Scientists Spot Unusually Close Binary TNOs

KEY POINTS

  • A team of researchers spotted a close pair of trans-Neptunian objects
  • The unusually close pair was also occulting a binary star system
  • The discovery was made with the help of a citizen science project

With the help of a citizen science research network, a team of researchers has discovered an unusual pair of trans-Neptunian objects (TNO).

Any object in our solar system that has an orbit beyond Neptune is considered a TNO. According to NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), there are about 70,000 known TNOs, including Pluto, each measuring at least 100 kilometers (62.137 miles​) across.

In a new study, published in The Planetary Science Journal, a team of researchers discovered a TNO pair orbiting each other. The researchers discovered them using a stellar occultation, which occurs when the light of a star is blocked by an object from reaching the observer, a news release from the 

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Study investigates the nature of X-ray binary IGR J18214-1318

Study investigates the nature of X-ray binary IGR J18214-1318
Swift’s XRT and BAT broadband spectrum of IGR J18214-1318. Top panel: data and best-fit model tbabs*pcfabs*(nthComp). Bottom panel: residuals in units of standard deviations. Credit: Cusumano et al., 2020.

Using various space observatories, Italian astronomers have investigated an X-ray binary source known as IGR J18214-1318. Results of the study, detailed in a paper published September 14 on the arXiv pre-print server, provide important information about the properties of this system, shedding more light into its nature.


X-ray binaries consist of a normal star or a white dwarf transferring mass onto a compact neutron star or a black hole. Based on the mass of the companion star, astronomers divide them into low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) and high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs).

IGR J18214-1318 is an HMXB detected with the INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) satellite in 2006. The object is associated to USNO-B1.0 0766-0475700—most likely a star of spectral type O9I.

In

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