An international team of researchers developed a novel technique to produce precise, high-performing biometric sensors — ScienceDaily

Wearable sensors are evolving from watches and electrodes to bendable devices that provide far more precise biometric measurements and comfort for users. Now, an international team of researchers has taken the evolution one step further by printing sensors directly on human skin without the use of heat.

Led by Huanyu “Larry” Cheng, Dorothy Quiggle Career Development Professor in the Penn State Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, the team published their results in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

“In this article, we report a simple yet universally applicable fabrication technique with the use of a novel sintering aid layer to enable direct printing for on-body sensors,” said first author Ling Zhang, a researcher in the Harbin Institute of Technology in China and in Cheng’s laboratory.

Cheng and his colleagues previously developed flexible printed circuit boards for use in wearable sensors, but printing directly on skin has been hindered by

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Okta plots new SDK, API to enable biometric, push notifications on mobile

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Okta is launching a new software developer kit and application programming interface that will enable developers to build biometric and push notification sign-ins. 

The move is part of a broader effort for password-less sign-ins to reduce friction and boost security. With the Okta SDK and API, developers can build mobile apps with branded push notifications and biometrics like FaceID to authenticate users.

According to Okta, security and authentication services need to acknowledge mobile-first workflows and technologies.

Also:

Okta is leveraging its Okta Devices Platform Service to do the following:

  • Embed Okta Verify technology with push and biometrics in mobile applications.
  • Develop branded omnichannel multi-factor authentication with custom push messaging and action buttons.
  • Deploy more layers of protection in high-risk access attempts.
  • Allow end users to view and manage their Okta registered devices including self-service options if a device is lost or stolen.

The Okta Devices SDK will be available for

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PhysIQ and Purdue University launch study to develop algorithms for detecting earliest signs of COVID-19 from biometric smartwatch data

Certain changes in a person’s heart and breathing rates could precede symptoms of COVID-19, an increasing number of studies suggests.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20200930005184/en/

Purdue University researchers are helping to develop physIQ software that could indicate that a person should get tested for COVID-19 by detecting specific changes in heart and breathing rates while the person wears a smartwatch. Pictured: Jennifer Anderson, Ph.D. student, Purdue’s Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering. (Purdue University photo/John Underwood)

Purdue University researchers have begun a study that would help determine if continuously collected biometric smartwatch data could be used to reliably and accurately detect these signs early, which could indicate that a potentially asymptomatic user should get tested for COVID-19.

Data from the study will inform new algorithms to be developed by physIQ, a Purdue-affiliated digital health technology company based in Chicago. The company has support from the

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Pay with your palm? Amazon unveils biometric ID, touting convenience and testing customer trust

The Amazon One palm-scanning biometric ID system will roll out initially as an option for customers when they check in to two Amazon Go convenience stores in Seattle. (Amazon Photo)

Amazon has developed a new biometric ID system that works by scanning the palms of participating customers, planning to ultimately let people make in-store payments, gain access to office buildings, and move quickly through stadium turnstiles by holding out a hand.

The system, called “Amazon One,” comes with numerous safeguards designed to protect user data. Even so, Amazon’s use of biometrics in stores and other commercial settings promises to attract scrutiny at a time of heightened awareness of digital security and privacy, testing the limits of customer trust in the company.

Amazon One is set to debut Tuesday at two Amazon Go convenience stores near the company’s Seattle headquarters, giving customers an alternative to the regular process of checking into

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