Commercially Available Silicon Quantum Computer Moves Forward With Quietest Bits On Record

KEY POINTS

  • Physicists achieve a noise level 10 times lower than the previous record
  • Demonstration proves to take a major step closer to a full-scale silicon quantum processor 
  • Next step could be a 10-qubit prototype quantum integrated processor by 2023

The lowest noise level on record for a semiconductor quantum bit has been demonstrated by a team of quantum physicists, bringing the development of a commercially available silicon quantum computer one step forward to possibility. 

In a study published in Advanced Materials, the physicists said they were able to achieve a noise level 10 times lower than previously recorded for any semiconductor qubit. Specifically, they demonstrated a low-level charge noise of  S0 = 0.0088 ± 0.0004 μeV2 Hz−1. 

As a next step, the team is now looking forward to demonstrating the capability required to produce a reliable 10-qubit prototype quantum integrated processor by 2023. 

“Our team is now working towards

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Bits of Venus may be lurking on the moon, scientists suggest

Does Venus host alien life? That’s the big question after a recent study spotted phosphine — a gas with possible biological origins — in the planet’s clouds. We won’t have answers until further investigation, but clues to the planet’s history of habitability could be closer than expected.



NASA created this computer-simulated global view of Venus' northern hemisphere. NASA/JPL


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NASA created this computer-simulated global view of Venus’ northern hemisphere. NASA/JPL

Yale University astronomers Samuel Cabot and Gregory Laughlin said we should look to the moon for a peek into Venus’ past. They explained why in a paper accepted into the Planetary Science Journal this month.

The study suggests “asteroids and comets slamming into Venus may have dislodged as many as 10 billion rocks and sent them into an orbit that intersected with Earth and Earth’s moon,” Yale said in a statement. These impacts were more common billions of years ago, meaning bits of ancient Venus could remain

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Data Is The New Oil (But Bits And Bytes Can’t Fill Your Tank)

American shale fracking technology, and to a lesser extent Canadian oil sands, enabled easy access to billions of barrels of reserves and ushered in a new “era of energy abundance” driven by way too many producers producing – or capable of producing – way too many molecules. The result was a “no moat” energy sector, margins got clobbered, and energy stocks got hammered. Today, the global oil and gas industry is beholden to state controlled energy companies (Saudi Arabia, Russia, etc.) to withhold millions of barrels of spare production capacity off the market simply to achieve WTI=$40/bbl. Meanwhile, technology companies have flourished as smartphones and CPUs/GPUs continue to evolve to higher levels of sophistication and performance, while emerging technologies like 5G, the cloud, AI, and the IoT (internet-of-things) have become reality. E-commerce and many other technology trends have been pulled forward and accelerated by COVID-19 and the WFH and SFH

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New technology lets quantum bits hold information for 10,000 times longer than previous record — ScienceDaily

Quantum bits, or qubits, can hold quantum information much longer now thanks to efforts by an international research team. The researchers have increased the retention time, or coherence time, to 10 milliseconds — 10,000 times longer than the previous record — by combining the orbital motion and spinning inside an atom. Such a boost in information retention has major implications for information technology developments since the longer coherence time makes spin-orbit qubits the ideal candidate for building large quantum computers.

They published their results on July 20 in Nature Materials.

“We defined a spin-orbit qubit using a charged particle, which appears as a hole, trapped by an impurity atom in silicon crystal,” said lead author Dr. Takashi Kobayashi, research scientist at the University of New South Wales Sydney and assistant professor at Tohoku University. “Orbital motion and spinning of the hole are strongly coupled and locked together. This is

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