Billionaire ‘Bond King’ Jeff Gundlach says stocks will crash, predicts a weaker dollar, and questions bitcoin in a new interview. Here are the 10 best quotes.



Jeffrey Gundlach wearing a suit and tie: 2011 Jeffrey Gundlach co-founder and Chief Executive Officer and Chief Investment Officer of DoubleLine speaks at the 16th annual Sohn Investment Conference in New York May 25, 2011. REUTERS/Jessica Rinaldi


© REUTERS/Jessica Rinaldi
2011 Jeffrey Gundlach co-founder and Chief Executive Officer and Chief Investment Officer of DoubleLine speaks at the 16th annual Sohn Investment Conference in New York May 25, 2011. REUTERS/Jessica Rinaldi

  • Jeff Gundlach, the billionaire investor known as the “Bond King,” predicted in a RealVision interview published on Friday that stocks would crash in less than 18 months.
  • The DoubleLine Capital CEO also said the US dollar would dive in the long run, argued that tech stocks like Apple and Amazon were the only US equities worth owning, and questioned bitcoin, welfare, and Chipotle’s valuation.
  • Here are Gundlach’s 10 best quotes from the discussion.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

In a RealVision interview filmed on October 1 and released on Friday, the billionaire “Bond King” Jeff Gundlach said stocks would crash within 18 months, predicted that the US dollar would tumble in the long run, and

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School bond and mill levy override

Ballot measure 4A, also called the Debt-Free Schools ballot initiative, seeks to invest in personnel across Denver Public Schools, specifically by increasing wages for hourly workers, offering a cost-of-living raise for teachers, and adding mental health professionals and nurses. The measure would be funded by an increase in property taxes; that increase is based on the “assessed value” of each property. If approved, the district estimates property taxes will increase about $51 annually, or $4.25 per month, for a home valued at $465,000.

The case for: Proponents of the measure see it as an investment in Denver children. By contributing funds to hiring and increasing pay for teachers, school staff and mental health professionals, the district believes every student can receive a high-quality education and receive the social-emotional support they need to navigate the coronavirus pandemic.

The case against: Opponents argue that now, in the midst of a pandemic that

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