Half of All UK Companies Fall Into Bottom Quadrant of Competitiveness, Posing Threat to UK’s Future Prosperity, New Research Reveals

LONDON–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Oct 12, 2020–

A new model of competitiveness devised by academics at Goldsmiths, University of London in partnership with Microsoft scores almost half (46%) of UK firms in the lowest quadrant, posing a threat to Britain’s prosperity as organisations rally from the impact of COVID-19, and prepare for Brexit as UK-EU negotiations reach their conclusion.

The research finds that more than half (54%) of UK organisations surveyed have seen a decrease in revenue this year compared to last year, with more than one in five (22%) experiencing a drop greater than 15%. The same proportion (22%) had to scrap an existing business model within days of entering the UK’s first lockdown, and 45% of leaders surveyed expect their current business model will cease to exist in 5 years’ time – an increase of 12% over the past year.

However, the model also identifies minimal, rapid changes that UK organisations

Read More
Read More

U.S. space mining policies may trigger regulatory ‘race to the bottom,’ scientists warn

Oct. 8 (UPI) — In a newly published policy paper, a pair of Canadian scientists warn that the United States is angling to establish itself as the de facto gatekeeper of the moon and other celestial bodies.

Earlier this year, NASA published a new set of rules for lunar mining and other space activities, dubbing the voluntary guidelines the “Artemis Accords.”

Aaron Boley and Michael Byers, authors of the new Science paper, argue that the Artemis Accords are part of a concerted effort by the U.S. and NASA to set a legal precedent for space-based resource extraction.

“It’s not the Artemis Accords alone that are problematic,” Michael Byers, professor of global politics and international law at the University of British Columbia, told UPI in an email. “Rather, it’s the ongoing and concerted U.S. diplomatic effort to promote national regulation of space mining and to proceed with resource extraction before a

Read More
Read More

There’s a giant ‘Green Banana’ off Florida’s coast, and researchers have finally gotten to the bottom of it

ocean
Credit: CC0 Public Domain

If you haven’t heard of the “Green Banana blue hole” you might imagine a tropical cocktail you can order in Key West, or a dessert you ordered after a night on Bourbon Street.


Forget that. This Green Banana is actually a mysterious sink hole. More specifically, it’s a huge, underwater cavern off the coast of Florida that humans had never fully explored—until last month.

Scientists say the Green Banana could hold clues to the formation of toxic red tides, algae blooms that are devastating to Florida’s shoreline, and the extent of the aquifer that supplies the state with most of its drinking water.

Maybe even the origins of life.

Blue holes—sink holes that form under water—are not unusual in the Gulf of Mexico. In the mid-1970s, a boat captain sailing about 60 miles west of Sarasota spotted one about 160 feet under water, and an unripe

Read More
Read More