Breakthrough discovery in gene causing severe nerve conditions — ScienceDaily

Researchers have made a breakthrough genetic discovery into the cause of a spectrum of severe neurological conditions.

A research study, led by the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute (MCRI) and gracing the cover of and published in the October edition of Human Mutation, found two new mutations in the KIF1A gene cause rare nerve disorders.

MCRI researcher Dr Simranpreet Kaur said mutations in the KIF1A gene caused ‘traffic jams’ in brain cells, called neurons, triggering a devastating range of progressive brain disorders. KIF1A-Associated Neurological Disorders (KAND) affects about 300 children worldwide.

“KAND symptoms often appear at birth or early childhood, have varying severity and can result in death within five years of life. Because clinical features overlap with other neurological disorders, children can be misdiagnosed or remain undiagnosed for a long period of time,” she said.

“Our study will lead to more diagnoses by expanding the mutation pool further, finding

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An important breakthrough essential for future flexible electronic devices — ScienceDaily

Field Effect Transistors (FET) are the core building blocks of modern electronics such as integrated circuits, computer CPUs and display backplanes. Organic Field Effect Transistors (OFETs), which use organic semiconductor as a channel for current flows, have the advantage of being flexible when compared with their inorganic counterparts like silicon.

OFETs, given their high sensitivity, mechanical flexibility, biocompatibility, property tunability and low-cost fabrication, are considered to have great potential in new applications in wearable electronics, conformal health monitoring sensors, and bendable displays etc. Imagine TV screens that can be rolled up; or smart wearable electronic devices and clothing worn close to the body to collect vital body signals for instant biofeedback; or mini-robots made of harmless organic materials working inside the body for diseases diagnosis, target drug transportations, mini-surgeries and other medications and treatments.

Until now, the main limitation on enhanced performance and mass production of OFETs lies in the

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TailorInsight Releases Report on ‘New Hologram AR Technology Is Expected to Make a Breakthrough’

Hong Kong – TailorInsight, the fintech market research organization, recently released a research report ‘New Hologram AR Technology Is Expected to Make a Breakthrough’. This year, the hot discussion on 5G topics has attracted much attention in the telecom market. With the development of 5G, business development, the 5G market has huge demand and the whole industry chain will be strongly driven. The evolution of 5G new technology opens a new application space in the three scenarios of eMBB, URLLC, and mMTC. 5G will go beyond the scope of communication connections and bring a profound intelligent digital economy revolution through the deep integration of communication, computing, and vertical industries.

At the same time, faster Internet speed will also promote the further development of naked-eye 3D. In the future, you can enjoy the 3D shocking effect without 3D glasses when watching movies. Similar industries are driven by virtual reality and augmented

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‘Digital chemistry’ breakthrough turns words into molecules

chemistry
Credit: OpenClipartVectors, CC0 Public Domain

A new system capable of automatically turning words into molecules on demand will open up the digitisation of chemistry, scientists say.


Researchers from the University of Glasgow’s School of Chemistry, who developed the system, claim it will lead to the creation of a “Spotify for chemistry”—a vast online repository of downloadable recipes for important molecules including drugs.

The creation of such a system could help developing countries more easily access medications, enable more efficient international scientific collaboration, and even support the human exploration of space.

The Glasgow team, led by Professor Lee Cronin, have laid the groundwork for digital chemistry with the development of what they call a “chemical processing unit”—an affordable desktop-sized robot chemist which is capable of doing the repetitive and time-consuming work of creating chemicals. Other robot chemists, built with different operating systems, have also been developed elsewhere.

Up until now, those

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Breakthrough for tomorrow’s dentistry — ScienceDaily

New knowledge on the cellular makeup and growth of teeth can expedite developments in regenerative dentistry — a biological therapy for damaged teeth — as well as the treatment of tooth sensitivity. The study, which was conducted by researchers at Karolinska Institutet, is published in Nature Communications.

Teeth develop through a complex process in which soft tissue, with connective tissue, nerves and blood vessels, are bonded with three different types of hard tissue into a functional body part. As an explanatory model for this process, scientists often use the mouse incisor, which grows continuously and is renewed throughout the animal’s life.

Despite the fact that the mouse incisor has often been studied in a developmental context, many fundamental questions about the various tooth cells, stem cells and their differentiation and cellular dynamics remain to be answered.

Using a single-cell RNA sequencing method and genetic tracing, researchers at Karolinska Institutet,

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Inaugural Winners of Heroes of Science: Breakthrough Filmmakers Challenge Announced

TheWrap and the Breakthrough Prize Foundation today announced the winners of the inaugural “Heroes of Science: Breakthrough Filmmakers Challenge” – a new competition created to promote and support the development of films dedicated exclusively to science and scientists. The announcement was made at TheGrill 2020, TheWrap’s annual business conference focused on the convergence between entertainment, media and technology.

Competitors submitted a proposal for a short film about a Breakthrough Prize laureate. Each candidate was then judged by a panel of experts including filmmakers, scientists and science communicators, based on the proposal’s engagement with the laureate and their work, its characterization, creativity, clarity, accuracy and vision, as well as the filmmaker’s experience.

The six winners are:
Cutter Hodierne and John Hibey (US)
Dana Turken (US)
Grace McNally (US)
Hussain Currimbhoy (Sweden) and Carrie McCarthy (US)
Molly Murphy (US)
Thor Klein (Germany)

Also Read: Breakthrough Prize Foundation and TheWrap Launch New Competition

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