20 years after Microsoft’s antitrust fight, Steve Ballmer betting that Big Tech won’t be broken up

Steve Ballmer. (GeekWire File Photo / Dan DeLong)

Twenty years after Microsoft waged its own antitrust battle with the U.S. government, former CEO Steve Ballmer is betting that Congress won’t break up Big Tech this time around.

In an interview with CNBC on Wednesday (below), Ballmer was reacting to a U.S. House antitrust subcommittee report released this week that found challenges presented by the dominance and business practices of Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google.

RELATED: House antitrust probe says Amazon has ‘monopoly power’ over sellers, company slams ‘fringe’ findings

“I’ll bet money that they will not be broken up,” Ballmer told CNBC.

The 450-page report from the subcommittee’s Democratic leaders concludes a 16-month investigation into the four companies as the operators of major online markets. It finds that the market power of the tech giants “has diminished consumer choice, eroded innovation and entrepreneurship in the U.S. economy, weakened the vibrancy

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Congress Agrees: Big Tech Is Broken.

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It is stunning that members of Congress mostly agree that four of America’s most successful companies are bullies that abuse their power to stay on top.

That was my thought reading the conclusions of a 16-month congressional investigation into whether Google, Facebook, Amazon and Apple broke the law to squash competition. The assessment was, essentially, yup.

The Democrats and Republicans on the House Judiciary Committee have major points of disagreement, and only Democrats signed this report. But while the two parties are divided — possibly irreconcilably so — over how to fix the problem, they appear to mostly agree that those four companies should not be allowed to continue as is.

It’s not unusual to hate on large companies; it was true of big banks and oil companies at the peak of

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Telepath is a buzzy new social network trying to fix what’s broken on Twitter

In July, amid the rise of the buzzy audio-only social network Clubhouse, some users reported being harassed by other members. This seemed obviously bad, but at the time the company had no guidelines about how users should behave on the site. Moderation duties were left to the two co-founders, then the company’s only employees, and it’s fair to say that enforcement was not their full-time focus.

When I wrote about the situation at Clubhouse, responses were divided. Some readers said that because the app was still in private beta, and had just two employees, users ought to cut it some slack. Moderation would come as the app scaled, they said, and to beat up the founders for not having every detail in place during the launch stage was unfair to the team.

The other view, which I took, is that any social product ought to begin with moderation in

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Doppler weather radar for Washington, D.C., Maryland, and Virginia is broken

That radar, a WSR-88D model, is the most powerful one tasked with scanning the skies in northern Virginia, central Maryland, the eastern panhandle of West Virginia, and the District. It’s part of a network of 159 such Doppler radars nationwide maintained by the National Weather Service. Each radar emits high frequency pulses of energy, a portion of which bounce off precipitation targets and offer valuable information from inside a storm.

While the radar is down, forecasters will rely on airport radars and Weather Service radars at adjacent offices in State College, Pa., Pittsburgh, Mount Holly, N.J., Wakefield, Va., Dover, Blacksburg, Va., and Charleston.

This network of radars can stitch together a reasonable representation of storm surveys.

The region has some of the best radar coverage in the country thanks to four smaller, less powerful “terminal” radars at the three major airports, Dulles, Reagan National and BWI Marshall, as well as

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