Astronomers capture a black hole shredding star into spaghetti strands

  • Astronomers at the European Southern Observatory observed a black hole sucking in a faraway star, shredding it into thin strands of stellar material.
  • This process, known as “spaghettification,” happens because of black holes’ powerful gravitational force.
  • At 215 million light-years away, this spaghettification process is the closest ever observed by astronomers. 
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Astronomers have captured a rarely-seen event: a flare of light caused by a black hole devouring a nearby star like spaghetti.

Observed in the Eridanus constellation, about 215 million light-years away from Earth, the star’s destruction is the closest such event astronomers have ever observed. 

“When an unlucky star wanders too close to a supermassive black hole in the center of a galaxy, the extreme gravitational pull of the black hole shreds the star into thin streams of material,” study author Thomas Wevers, a fellow at the European Southern Observatory in Santiago,

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TIME’s Camera Arrives at ISS to Capture VR Spacewalk

It’s entirely possible you missed it, but on Oct. 2 at 9:16 PM ET, you lifted off for the International Space Station. Just over two days later, you docked successfully—and it’s a good thing you did. You’ve got a spacewalk planned for later this year.

O.K., technically speaking, you didn’t go anywhere at all, and unless you’re actually a highly-trained astronaut, you certainly shouldn’t be planning for a real-deal spacewalk—or extravehicular activity (EVA)—any time soon. But you could very much share in the experience when actual ISS crew members venture outside of the station for one of the most exciting and dangerous experiences an astronaut can have.

That’s because something special was included among the ISS-bound cargo on the uncrewed Cygnus supply vehicle that took off from Wallops Island, Va. earlier this week: the first-ever 3D, virtual reality camera designed to operate in the vacuum of space. It’s the

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Camera Designed by Felix & Paul Studios and TIME Arrives at ISS to Capture First-Ever Virtual Reality Spacewalk

It’s entirely possible you missed it, but on Oct. 2 at 9:16 PM ET, you lifted off for the International Space Station. Just over two days later, you docked successfully—and it’s a good thing you did. You’ve got a spacewalk planned for later this year.

O.K., technically speaking, you didn’t go anywhere at all, and unless you’re actually a highly-trained astronaut, you certainly shouldn’t be planning for a real-deal spacewalk—or extravehicular activity (EVA)—any time soon. But you could very much share in the experience when actual ISS crew members venture outside of the station for one of the most exciting and dangerous experiences an astronaut can have.

That’s because something special was included among the ISS-bound cargo on the uncrewed Cygnus supply vehicle that took off from Wallops Island, Va. earlier this week: the first-ever 3D, virtual reality camera designed to operate in the vacuum of space. It’s the product

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Lego-like assembly of zeolitic membranes improves carbon capture — ScienceDaily

Zeolites are porous minerals that occur both naturally but also are being synthesized artificially. Because they are stable and durable, zeolites are used for chemical catalysis, purification of gases and liquids, and even in medical applications such as drug delivery and blood-clotting powders, e.g. the QuickClot trauma bandages used in the US military.

Zeolites used in gas separation are usually produced as membranes. The state-of-the-art zeolitic membranes are manufactured by a lengthy and complex crystallization process. Unfortunately, this method has proved difficult to reproduce. Also, it lacks in producing efficient gas-separation membranes, especially when it comes to the separation of hydrogen and carbon dioxide, which is necessary for pre-combustion carbon capture from power plants.

A team of chemical engineers led by Kumar Agrawal at EPFL Valais Wallis have now successfully simplified the chemistry behind zeolite membrane synthesis, making it simple, reproducible, and scalable. The achievement of the longstanding goal is

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Edmonton non-profit funds forest creation for natural carbon capture in Alberta

Project Forest planting crew

Treetime Services planting crew work to reforest a pipeline right of way in Northeast Alberta near Lac La Biche. Photo credit: Supplied by Project Forest
Treetime Services planting crew work to reforest a pipeline right of way in Northeast Alberta near Lac La Biche. Photo credit: Supplied by Project Forest
Treetime Services planting crew work to reforest a pipeline right of way in Northeast Alberta near Lac La Biche. Photo credit: Supplied by Project Forest

EDMONTON, Oct. 01, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — It’s been proven that forests capture carbon naturally—they literally suck. And one Alberta non-profit, run by a team of passionate silviculturists, wants to harness that power for good by creating opportunities to rewild local landscapes close to home. 

“Forests are arguably the most cost-effective means of capturing atmospheric carbon,” says Mike Toffan, General Manager of Reclamation and Forestry for Tree Time Services and founder of Project Forest. “They clean the air and water, support animal habitat and provide us with a natural playground.”

While there are a number of

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Fortem Technologies Adds New Capabilities to Autonomously Capture a Wider Array of Drone Threats, Including Faster Moving Fixed Wing Drones

Pleasant Grove, UT, Sept. 16, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Fortem Technologies Inc., a leader in airspace security and defense for detecting and defeating dangerous drones, announced today advancements to its SkyDome® System software that allow the Fortem DroneHunter® to autonomously shift into one of three various modes to best defeat a threatening drone. DroneHunter, the world’s premier AI-driven interceptor drone, autonomously determines whether to chase, attack or defend against the threatening drone depending on the drone’s size, speed and trajectory. These advancements allow DroneHunter to pursue and safely capture an even wider range of drone threats including faster fixed wing drones.

When in defense mode, the DroneHunter maneuvers in front of the target drone, anticipating its approach. Once in range, DroneHunter fires the NetGun precisely as the target attempts to pass. The defensive mode position also facilitates a radically faster detect-to-capture-time, as the time previously required to get behind the

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Death counts fail to capture full mortality effects of COVID-19, study finds — ScienceDaily

More than 200,000 people in the U.S. have died from COVID-19. Some argue that statistic is inaccurate due to inconsistencies in how deaths are being reported. But researchers from the University of South Florida claim that even if those deaths have been correctly measured, the number doesn’t fully convey the true mortality effects of COVID-19.

A study published in the Journal of Public Health finds that for each person in the U.S. who died after contracting COVID-19, an average of nearly 10 years of life had been lost. Researchers claim “years of life lost” is a more insightful measure than death count since it accounts for the ages of the deceased. The tool is often used to determine the effects of non-communicable disease, drug misuse and suicide. They believe “years of life lost” is especially appropriate given the range of ages at which individuals have died of COVID-19.

“While death

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