San Antonio company working with military, SpaceX to move cargo anywhere in world in an hour or less

A San Antonio company is partnering with the military and SpaceX to move cargo anywhere in the world in an hour using commercial spacecraft — including vertical-landing rockets built in Texas.

U.S. Transportation Command, which is responsible for moving military personnel and equipment around the world, said it’s working with Exploration Architecture, or XArc, and Elon Musk’s SpaceX to develop “rapid transportation through space” capabilities.

XArc, with six employees, is responsible for determining what’s needed on the ground to launch and land commercial spacecraft around the world.

The collaboration is the latest development in Texas’ still-expanding role in space travel and could help the U.S. military more quickly respond to threats and humanitarian crises around the world.

The aim is to use commercial space vehicles, including SpaceX’s Starship, to deliver payloads anywhere in the world. Starship can carry loads of 220,000 pounds.

“Our role is to understand the

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Cargo carriers warn that getting a COVID-19 vaccine to everyone on Earth could take up to two years



a large passenger jet sitting on top of a runway: Space on scheduled cargo flights is already filling up through February, with holiday shopping and consumer electronics leading the demand. vaalaa/Shutterstock.com


© vaalaa/Shutterstock.com
Space on scheduled cargo flights is already filling up through February, with holiday shopping and consumer electronics leading the demand. vaalaa/Shutterstock.com

  • Even if a coronavirus vaccine is approved soon, it will likely be years until it can be distributed around the world, according to cargo airline and logistics executives.
  • Challenging storage and shipping requirements, combined with reduced cargo availability and higher demand, are likely to delay distribution, according to a new Wall Street Journal report.
  • Although cargo airlines are trying to prepare, a host of unknowns — including where the vaccine will be made, how many doses are needed, and how it will need to be stored — means there’s only so much that can be organized in advance.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Even if a COVID-19 vaccine can be developed, approved, and mass produced quickly, getting it to countries and communities around the world

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Einride raises $10 million to fast track its autonomous electric cargo pods

For the past four years, Swedish startup Einride has captured interest, investment and even a few customer contracts for its unusual-looking pods — electric and autonomous vehicles that are designed to carry freight. But progress in developing, testing and validating autonomous vehicles — particularly ones that don’t even have space for a driver and rely on teleoperations — is an expensive and time-consuming task.

The company has made some progress with its T-Pod vehicles; four of them are on public roads today and even carry freight for customer Oatly, the Swedish food producer. Now, a year after raising $25 million, the company said it has another $10 million coming in from its existing investors.

The announcement comes ahead of a new vehicle the Einride will unveil October 8. Not much is known about the vehicle; Einride has only supplied a short and obscure teaser video.

Einride said the $10 million

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Cargo Spacecraft Carrying New Toilet to ISS Finally Launches

After several scrubbed attempts, a Northrop Grumman Antares rocket has taken off from NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility on Wallops Island, Virginia, launching an uncrewed Cygnus cargo spacecraft bound for the International Space Station (ISS). The Cygnus spacecraft is carrying a total of 8,000 pounds of crew supplies and science experiments for the ISS.

The mission had been expected to originally launch on Tuesday, September 29, but this had to be pushed back due to unfavorable weather conditions. The new launch date was set for Thursday, October 1, and the rocket was fueled and ready to go but was then scrubbed again after an issue with ground support equipment. The launch was pushed back once more to late on Friday, October 2, and this time the launch went ahead as planned at 9:16 p.m. ET.

A Northrop Grumman Antares rocket launches to the International Space Station on Oct. 2, 2020, from NASA's Wallops Flight Facility, Wallops Island, Virginia. The rocket is carrying a Cygnus spacecraft with 8,000 pounds of supplies and experiments.
A Northrop Grumman Antares rocket launches to the International Space Station on Oct. 2, 2020, from
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NASA Science, Cargo Heads to Space Station on Northrop Grumman Resupply Mission

NASA Science, Cargo Heads to Space Station on Northrop Grumman Resupply Mission

PR Newswire

WASHINGTON, Oct. 3, 2020

WASHINGTON, Oct. 3, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — A Northrop Grumman Cygnus resupply spacecraft is on its way to the International Space Station with nearly 8,000 pounds of scientific investigations, technology demonstrations, commercial products, and other cargo after launching at 9:16 p.m. EDT Friday from NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility on Wallops Island, Virginia.

NASA Logo. (PRNewsFoto/NASA) (PRNewsFoto/) (PRNewsfoto/NASA)
NASA Logo. (PRNewsFoto/NASA) (PRNewsFoto/) (PRNewsfoto/NASA)

The spacecraft launched on an Antares rocket from the Virginia Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport’s Pad 0A at Wallops and is scheduled to arrive at the space station around 5:20 a.m. Monday, Oct. 5. Coverage of the spacecraft’s approach and arrival will begin at 3:45 a.m. on NASA Television and the agency’s website.

Expedition 63 Commander Chris Cassidy of NASA will use the space station’s robotic arm to capture Cygnus, while Ivan Vagner of Roscosmos

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NASA launches new astronaut toilet and more to space station on Cygnus cargo ship

A robotic Cygnus spacecraft successfully blasted off from Virginia late Friday (Oct. 2) carrying nearly 4 tons of gear, including a new space toilet, to the International Space Station. 

A Northrop Grumman Antares rocket lit up the night sky alongside a nearly full moon at 9:16 p.m. EDT (0116 GMT on Oct. 3) as it launched the Cygnus NG-14 mission to the space station from the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport at NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility on Wallops Island, Virginia. 

The craft is hauling 7,624 lbs. (3,458 kilograms) of cargo that includes scientific equipment, an experimental space toilet, food, hardware and other supplies for the Expedition 63/64 astronauts living and working on the space station. 

The launch came after a series of delays due to weather this week and less than 24 hours after a launch abort late Thursday (Oct. 1) due to a ground support equipment issue.

Related: See amazing launch

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Watch live Friday! Antares rocket to launch NASA cargo on Cygnus spacecraft

Update: NASA and Northrop Grumman are now targeting Friday night (Oct. 2) for the launch of the Cygnus NG-14 mission atop its Antares rocket. Liftoff is set for 9:16 p.m. EDT (0116 GMT), pending the resolution of tonight’s launch abort.

Original post: 

On Thursday, Oct. 1, a Northrop Grumman Cygnus cargo ship carrying nearly 4 tons of NASA cargo will launch toward the International Space Station from the agency’s Wallops Flight Facility on Wallops Island, Virginia. 

A Northrop Grumman-built Antares rocket will launch the Cygnus spacecraft on the CRS-14 (or NG-14) mission from Pad OA at Wallops at 9:38 p.m. EDT (0138 GMT). The mission has been delayed from Sept. 29 due to bad weather. NASA’s webcast will begin at 9 p.m. EDT (0100 GMT). 

Antares rocket launch for NASA visible along the US East Coast tonight. Here’s how to watch.

NASA commercial cargo provider Northrop Grumman is

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NASA talks big science riding on NG-13 Cygnus cargo ship

NASA will hold a press conference to discuss the many science payloads set to launch to the International Space Station Sept. 29 on a Northrop Grumman Antares rocket and the NG-13 Cygnus spacecraft. 



a hand holding a black umbrella: Northrop Grumman's Cygnus NG-13 cargo resupply spacecraft, with its shiny, cymbal-shaped solar arrays, is pictured in the grasp of the Canadarm2 robot arm on the International Space Station just before the vessel's departure on Monday (May 11). The NG-13 cargo ship, which delivered 7,500 lbs. (3,400 kilograms) of supplies for the station's three-person Expedition 62 crew in February, will spend the next few weeks flying solo in orbit, deploying tiny satellites and conducting a fire experiment. It will fall back to Earth on May 29 and safely burn up in our planet's atmosphere above the Pacific Ocean.


© Provided by Space
Northrop Grumman’s Cygnus NG-13 cargo resupply spacecraft, with its shiny, cymbal-shaped solar arrays, is pictured in the grasp of the Canadarm2 robot arm on the International Space Station just before the vessel’s departure on Monday (May 11). The NG-13 cargo ship, which delivered 7,500 lbs. (3,400 kilograms) of supplies for the station’s three-person Expedition 62 crew in February, will spend the next few weeks flying solo in orbit, deploying tiny satellites and conducting a fire experiment. It will fall back to Earth on May 29 and safely burn up in our planet’s atmosphere above the Pacific Ocean.

The press conference today, Sept. 24, will begin at 1 p.m. EDT (1700 GMT) and include

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