dLocal Expands Emerging Markets Payments Platform in the Caribbean, LATAM

Emerging market payments leader enables its merchants to accept and distribute local payments in Costa Rica, Panama, and the Dominican Republic.

dLocal, the leading cross-border payment platform connecting global merchants to emerging markets, today announced it has expanded its payments network to include three markets in Latin America and the Caribbean: Costa Rica, Panama, and the Dominican Republic.

Leveraging a proprietary and flexible API-based payments technology platform, dLocal now supports over 300 local payment methods in 23 emerging market countries, including the top five emerging markets in the world by population (Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, and Mexico). Merchants integrate just once to dLocal’s API to accept payment in any of the 23 countries where dLocal operates across LATAM, APAC, Middle East and Africa and can do so without a physical presence. This expansion comes less than a month after dLocal secured $200 million in new funding to become one of

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Marine Heat Waves Are Putting Caribbean Fisheries In Hot Water

Small-scale fisheries are a critical component of the social and economic and fabric of coastal communities in the Caribbean and are key to the region’s food security, with annual fish consumption ranging between 10 and 35 kg/capita per year (FAO, 2014). But marine heat waves (MHW) or extended periods of anomalously warm ocean temperatures1 can have major impacts on marine biodiversity and ecosystems, and are a significant threat to the regional fisheries sector. A 2019 study in journal, Nature Climate Change, reports that coral reefs in the Caribbean have been among the hardest hit by heat waves, and the Food and Agriculture Organisation has found that the Caribbean fisheries sector is most vulnerable to climate change in the world. (Monnereau, 2017)

According to a September article in journal, Science, as global warming makes oceans hotter, marine heat waves (MHW) have become at least 20 times more likely. “The duration,

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Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico areas to watch for tropical storms

Historically, hurricane season peaks about Sept. 10, activity typically in top gear leading into October. But this year’s hyperactive September came screeching to a halt Friday, when Teddy and Beta in the Atlantic and Lowell in the Pacific fizzled or lost tropical characteristics entirely. Since then, the world’s oceans have been virtually silent. But they won’t be for long.

A large zone of rising air at mid-to-upper levels of the atmosphere will soon overspread the Atlantic from the west, at the same time as global circulations favor an uptick in shower and thunderstorm activity. The two factors could overlap to bring about a renewal in tropical busyness.

An area to watch

The National Hurricane Center is already monitoring one area in the northwest Caribbean that could prove problematic in the coming week. The center estimates a 50-percent chance that tropical development will occur sometime in the next five days.

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Group raising $50,000 to send science kits to schools in South America, Caribbean

ORLANDO, Fla. – A group of passionate science communicators from around the world are working to bring science supplies to students in South America and the Caribbean and one of the group members plans to fly down the supplies once it’s all said and done.

Passage was founded by a growing group of young and veteran leaders in science, with the goal of supplying more than 20,000 pre-kindergarten to high school-age children with the tools to help them learn about science, technology, engineering and math fields.

“It’s for kids and students who, you know, maybe are in high school who are going to be going into college to get into STEM degrees, or just starting off who looked at Bob and Doug go to space and said, I want to be an astronaut,” Passage group member NASA engineer Joan Melendez-Misners said.

[SPACE CURIOUS PODCAST: Astronomers are working to ensure large

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