Central Camera to reopen in Chicago’s Loop after being destroyed amid civil unrest

CHICAGO (WLS) — Central Camera needed to close its doors after $1 million of inventory was damaged during the civil unrest this summer in the wake of George Floyd’s murder. The 121-year-old store will reopen for the first time since the incident by the end of this month.

Don Flesch’s grandfather opened the store in 1899, and it has become part of the community since.

“It is uplifting for us, and it has been uplifting to them to know where to go, or where they can buy something, or we tell them we don’t have it. If they need right away, fine. If they can wait, then we special order it, so it’s a community feeling,” said Flesch, owner of Central Camera.

“Because it has a history, it has a neighborhood even though it’s the city, and he is a wonderful person, and it’s something that’s really missing” said Kiyomi

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Central Asian horse riders played ball games 3,000 years ago — ScienceDaily

Researchers have investigated ancient leather balls discovered in the graves of horse riders in northwest China. According to the international research team, they are around 3,000 years old, making them the oldest balls in Eurasia. The find suggests amongst others that the mounted warriors of Central Asia played ball games to keep themselves fit.

Today, ball games are one of the most popular leisure activities in the world, an important form of mass entertainment and big business. But who invented balls, where and when? The oldest balls that are currently known about were made in Egypt about 4,500 years ago using linen. Central Americans have been playing ball games for at least 3,700 years, as evidenced through monumental ball courts made of stone and depictions of ball players. Their oldest balls were made of rubber. Until now, it was believed that ball games in Europe and Asia followed much later:

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Study may advance genetic therapies for blindness and other injuries to the central nervous system — ScienceDaily

Working with fish, birds and mice, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report new evidence that some animals’ natural capacity to regrow neurons is not missing, but is instead inactivated in mammals. Specifically, the researchers found that some genetic pathways that allow many fish and other cold-blooded animals to repair specialized eye neurons after injury remain present in mammals as well, but are turned off, blocking regeneration and healing.

A description of the study, published online by the journal Science on Oct. 1, offers a better understanding of how genes that control regeneration are conserved across species, as well as how they function. This may help scientists develop ways to grow cells that are lost due to hereditary blindness and other neurodegenerative diseases.

“Our research overall indicates that the potential for regeneration is there in mammals, including humans, but some evolutionary pressure has turned it off,” says Seth Blackshaw, Ph.D., professor of

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