Alcohol use changed right after COVID-19 lockdown — ScienceDaily

One in four adults reported a change in alcohol use almost immediately after stay-at-home orders were issued, according to a study of twins led by Washington State University researchers.

The study, published recently in Frontiers in Psychiatry, surveyed more than 900 twin pairs from the Washington State Twin Registry from March 26 to April 5, 2020, just after stay-at-home orders were issued in Washington on March 23. An estimated 14% of survey respondents said they drank more alcohol than the week prior and reported higher levels of stress and anxiety than those who did not drink alcohol and those whose use stayed the same.

“We expected that down the road people might turn to alcohol after the stay-at-home orders were issued, but apparently it happened right off the bat,” said Ally Avery, lead author of the study and a scientific operations manager at WSU’s Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine.

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The CRISPR story: How basic research discovery changed science

When Jennifer Doudna and Emmanuelle Charpentier embarked on the project that would change science and medicine in incalculable ways, their intentions were much more muted. Theirs was a basic research inquiry into bacterial immune systems, not an attempt to develop a new tool to manipulate the genetic code.

Yet their discovery of the CRISPR-Cas9 editing complex, recognized Wednesday with the Nobel Prize in chemistry, has ignited what even scientists allergic to hyperbole routinely call a revolution in how science is conducted. Researchers and companies are regularly discovering new applications in agriculture, diagnostics, and therapeutic development.

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Google Just Forever Changed How We Find Each Other and Not Entirely in a Good Way

On Tuesday, Google published a blog post to announce it was “giving everyone, everywhere an address.” That sounds very generous of the company, though it’s worth considering what that really means. Obviously Google runs the largest map service on earth, and it isn’t even close. Clearly it has a motivation to bring a standardized way of locating places since Google Maps is the default way many people get directions every day.

In that sense, Plus Codes, which is what Google is calling this new feature, is a good thing. According to Google:

Plus Codes use latitude and longitude to produce a short, easy-to-share digital address that can represent any location on the planet… A Plus Code can easily be used where no addresses, street names or even streets exist today.  Someone in an area without addresses no longer needs to give out complicated instructions to find a home or workplace–like

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ACMA survey highlights how COVID-19 changed Australia’s online behaviour

Australia’s reliance on the internet and communication services grew significantly for the six months to June 2020, the Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) 2020 annual consumer survey has revealed.

It showed that 99% of Australians accessed the internet, an increase from 90% of Australians who accessed the internet during the same period last year.

The survey suggested the increase in online activities was likely driven by the COVID-19 restrictions that were introduced in March 2020, given that there were no significant changes from 2018 to 2019.

Emailing, web browsing, banking, and watching videos remained the most popular online activities during the six months.

Read: Long-term remote work is leading to a global drop in productivity (TechRepublic)

Also, for the first time, the ACMA survey showed the participation rates of users going online for accessing news, posting and engaging with content, video conferencing and calling, working from home, telehealth consultations,

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How A Break From Lord Sugar Changed The Fortunes Of This Young Entrepreneur

It takes hard work, determination, and talent to achieve startup success, but getting an early break from a major business leader like Lord Alan Sugar can be a real game changer, as entrepreneur Ross Testa, founder of video and social media agency 3 Heads Agency discovered.

At school, Testa had no idea where his future career lay. While his friends pursued predictable routes into law, medicine, and journalism, he admits that his plans were non-existent. Everything changed when, aged 18, he decided to organize a charity week at school to raise money for the Teenage Cancer Trust after one of his closest friends, Ellis Haggith, was diagnosed with leukemia.

He says: “I was determined to make it a success, and it was: the campaign raised just under £5,000 in one week. We had support from a lot of businesses and celebrities, and the experience made

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The Mother of Pulsars: Jocelyn Bell Burnell and the squiggle that changed science

Jocelyn Bell Burnell in 1968.


Daily Herald Archive/SSPL/Getty Images

In 1967, when she was just 24 years old, Jocelyn Bell Burnell saw a quarter-inch-long “squiggle” on a piece of paper that would change her life and reshape the course of astrophysics. 

Bell Burnell was working on her Ph.D. at Cambridge at the time, reading signals from a radio telescope in the hope of finding quasars — supermassive black holes, millions of times the size of our sun, that spew out huge amounts of energy from billions of light-years away. 

As part of her Ph.D. research, Bell Burnell had helped build a telescope to receive these signals from across the universe. It was known as the Interplanetary Scintillation Array — a radio telescope made up of 2,000 metal antennas and 120 miles of cable and wires, all strung up on more than 1,000 wooden posts. The entire thing covered an area

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Jocelyn Bell Burnell and the squiggle that changed science

In 1967, when she was just 24 years old, Jocelyn Bell Burnell saw a quarter-inch-long “squiggle” on a piece of paper that would change her life and reshape the course of astrophysics. 



a woman wearing sunglasses posing for the camera: Jocelyn Bell Burnell in 1968. Daily Herald Archive/SSPL/Getty Images


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Jocelyn Bell Burnell in 1968. Daily Herald Archive/SSPL/Getty Images

Bell Burnell was working on her Ph.D. at Cambridge at the time, reading signals from a radio telescope in the hope of finding quasars — supermassive black holes, millions of times the size of our sun, that spew out huge amounts of energy from billions of light-years away. 

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As part of her Ph.D. research, Bell Burnell had helped build a telescope to receive these signals from across the universe. It was known as the Interplanetary Scintillation Array — a radio telescope made up of 2,000 metal antennas and 120 miles of cable and wires, all strung up on more than 1,000 wooden posts.

Read More
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