Immune T cells swarm to tumours by following a chemical gradient left by other cancer-killing T cells — ScienceDaily

When immune system T cells find and recognise a target, they release chemicals to attract more T cells which then swarm to help subdue the threat, shows a new study published today in eLife.

The discovery of this swarming behaviour, and the chemical attractants that immune cells use to direct swarms towards tumours, could one day help scientists develop new cancer therapies that boost the immune system. This is particularly important for solid tumours, which so far have been less responsive to current immunotherapies than cancers affecting blood cells.

“Scientists have previously thought that cancer-killing T cells identified tumours by randomly searching for them or by following the chemical trails laid by other intermediary immune cells,” says lead author Jorge Luis Galeano Niño, a PhD graduate at UNSW Sydney. “We wanted to investigate this further to see if it’s true, or whether T cells locate tumours via another mechanism.”

Read More
Read More

Chemical Segment to Present Lucrative Opportunities in Air Separation Plants Market, China to Exhibit Promising Growth

Owing to the increased adoption of air separation plants in chemical, healthcare and food industry, revenue is set to steer up tremendously through 2029.

DUBAI, UAE / ACCESSWIRE / October 12, 2020 / The air separation plant market expected to surpass US$ 4870.6 million by 2029 as a part of which China and India is expected to witness a positive graph for the demand and production of air separation plants market. Due to increasing demand in major industries, manufacturers are working on developing on-site customized plant systems to gain a steady growth.

“Among the others, though chemical industry will hold maximum share, it will not outsell other major industries. It will surely dominate the market and will hold a considerable share but customized side of it will help the profit rise tremendously. Manufacturers are also focussing on better utilization of resources, raw materials and decreasing labour cost to enhance revenue

Read More
Read More

With $300 Million In New Funding, Zymergen Aims To Sustainably Transform The $3 Trillion Chemical And Materials Industry

By making better, greener alternatives to petrochemistry, Zymergen sees a huge economic and environmental opportunity

As the smoke from a dozen wildfires darkened San Francisco, Josh Hoffman took his two children outside to see the surreal morning sky. It looked like a dystopian scene from Blade Runner 2049.

“My kids were scared because the sun never rose, and when it did it looked like a dying planet,” says the CEO of Zymergen, a biomanufacturing company. In the apocalyptic skies, Hoffman saw the end of times that so many warn about if we don’t get a handle on climate

Read More
Read More

Chemical innovation stabilizes best-performing perovskite formulation

Chemical innovation stabilizes best-performing perovskite formulation
Publishing in Science, researchers at EPFL have successfully overcome a limiting problem with stabilizing the best-performing formulation of metal-halide perovskite films, a key player in a range of applications, including solar cells. Credit: Nripan Mathews NTU, Singapore

Perovskites are a class of materials made up of organic materials bound to a metal. Their fascinating structure and properties have propelled perovskites into the forefront of materials’ research, where they are studied for use in a wide range of applications. Metal-halide perovskites are especially popular, and are being considered for use in solar cells, LED lights, lasers, and photodetectors.


For example, the power-conversion efficiency of perovskite solar cells (PSCs) have increased from 3.8% to 25.5% in only ten years, surpassing other thin-film solar cells—including the market-leading, polycrystalline silicon.

Perovskites are usually made by mixing and layering various materials together on a transparent conducting substrate., which produces thin, lightweight films. The process,

Read More
Read More

Army fields new chemical detection technology

IMAGE

IMAGE: Research through the U.S. Army Small Business Technology Transfer program, results in a product to accurately detect chemical weapons at low concentration levels. It is now being used by National…
view more 

Credit: U.S. Army

RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, N.C. — Chemical weapons pose a serious threat to civilian and warfighter lives, but technology from the U.S. Army Small Business Technology Transfer program reduces those risks. Researchers developed a product to detect chemical weapons accurately at low concentration levels.

Active Army, Reserve and National Guard units started to receive the Chemical Agent Disclosure Spray and the Contamination Indicator/Decontamination Assurance System, known as CIDAS. The Army is fielding it to all units in areas where there is a threat of chemical agents.

The Chemical Agent Disclosure Spray, purchased by FLIR Systems, Inc., has transitioned into the CIDAS Program of Record within the Joint Program Executive Office for CBRN Defense. The research,

Read More
Read More