Chemists create new crystal form of insecticide, boosting its ability to fight mosquitoes and malaria — ScienceDaily

Through a simple process of heating and cooling, New York University researchers have created a new crystal form of deltamethrin — a common insecticide used to control malaria — resulting in an insecticide that is up to 12 times more effective against mosquitoes than the existing form.

The findings, published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), may provide a much-needed and affordable insecticide alternative in the face of growing resistance among mosquitoes.

“The use of more active crystal forms of insecticides is a simple and powerful strategy for improving commercially available compounds for malaria control, circumventing the need for developing new products in the ongoing fight against mosquito-borne diseases,” said Bart Kahr, professor of chemistry at NYU and one of the study’s senior authors.

“Improvements in malaria control are needed as urgently as ever during the global COVID-19 crisis,” added Kahr. “The number of

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Physicists and chemists engineer optical fibers with 2D materials — ScienceDaily

At the latest since the Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded for research on graphene in 2010, 2D materials — nanosheets with atomic thickness — have been a hot topic in science.

This significant interest is due to their outstanding properties, which have enormous potential for a wide variety of applications. For instance, combined with optical fibres, 2D materials can enable novel applications in the areas of sensors, non-linear optics, and quantum technologies. However, combining these two components has so far been very laborious. Typically, the atomically thin layers had to be produced separately before being transferred by hand onto the optical fibre. Together with Australian colleagues, Jena researchers have now succeeded for the first time in growing 2D materials directly on optical fibres. This approach significantly facilitates manufacturing of such hybrids. The results of the study were reported recently in the journal on materials science Advanced Materials.

Growth

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Chemists propose a new method for the synthesis of pyrroles

A Team of Chemists from RUDN University Suggested a New Method for the Synthesis of Pyrroles
A Team of Chemists from RUDN University Suggested a New Method for the Synthesis of Pyrroles. Credit: RUDN University

A group of chemists from RUDN University proposed a new safe approach for the synthesis of pyrroles, substances used in the production of biologically active compounds, from simple and affordable raw materials. The new method would reduce the cost of final products (including some medicinal drugs) hundreds of times. The article was published in the European Journal of Organic Chemistry.


Pyrrole and its derivatives play an important role in the synthesis of biologically active substances. Dozens of medications are based on pyrrole, including the antitumor drug Sunitinib; BM212, which suppresses the growth of tubercle bacillus, and Toradol, which is used as an anti-inflammatory agent and painkiller. Pyrrole derivatives are also used to produce borondipyrromethenes (BODIPY) that are a part of photodynamic cancer therapy.

Pyrrole is a heterocyclic aromatic organic compound,

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