Scientists utilized citizen science network to observe the object — ScienceDaily

A new study authored by Southwest Research Institute scientists Rodrigo Leiva and Marc Buie reveals the binary nature of a trans-Neptunian object (TNO). Leiva and Buie utilized data obtained by the Research and Education Collaborative Occultation Network (RECON), a citizen science research net-work dedicated to observing the outer solar system. The study was published this month in The Astrophysical Journal.

Trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) are small icy bodies that orbit the Sun beyond Neptune. Binary TNOs occur when two of these objects orbit each other while together or-biting the Sun. Leiva and Buie discovered two objects in a particularly close gravitational configuration. The pair was detected using a stellar occultation, which occurs when an object passes between Earth and a distant star which hides, or “occults,” the star from view. Observers located in the path of the object’s shadow can record the star blinking out and reappearing. The length of time

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Citizen scientists reveal frogs’ initial response to ‘black summer’ bushfires

Surviving the flames: citizen scientists reveal frogs’ initial response to ‘black summer’ bushfires
The threatened Southern Barred Frog, one of the frogs recorded calling in burnt areas post-fire using FrogID. Credit: Dr Jodi Rowley

New research from the Australian Museum (AM) and UNSW Sydney published today in Conservation Science and Practice reveals that many frog species in southeastern Australia have initially survived following the unprecedented bushfires in late 2019 and early 2020. By area burnt, this fire season was the largest in southeastern Australia since European occupation and as a result, it had a dramatic impact on biodiversity, including frogs.


Frogs are one of the most threatened groups of animals on earth and face many risks, including the growing threat of fires due to the climate crisis.

“However, we don’t know enough about frogs’ response to fire, and there are limited studies on the impact of fire on Australian frogs—so we urgently needed real-time data to understand how frogs fared after the fires,

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