12th District Court of Appeals says New Miami does not have to repay speeders $3.4 million

One of the speeders’ attorneys, Josh Engel, said they are considering an Ohio Supreme Court appeal.

“We are disappointed, especially since the court (and particularly Judge Piper) seemed to recognize the unfairness of a system designed primarily for profit, not safety,” Engel told the Journal-News.

Retired Butler County Judge Michael Sage deemed the program unlawful in March 2014 and Judge Michael Oster affirmed that ruling and ordered the village repay the tickets and around $400,000 in interest.

ExploreNew Miami: Village only owes speeders $10K, not $3.4M

New Miami’s outside counsel James Englert said he could not comment until he read the decision.

The speed cameras won’t begin rolling again any time soon however because the village is also locked in litigation with the state over punitive new laws that have curtailed their program. New Miami asked Common Pleas Judge Greg Howard to issue a temporary restraining order and injunction

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GOP’s ‘Inappropriate’ Supreme Court Push May Open Way To Reform, Says Andrew Yang

Public unhappiness over the “inappropriate” Republican push to fill a vacant Supreme Court seat weeks before the elections may actually build broad support for significant reform of the institution, said former tech executive and presidential candidate Andrew Yang.

Speaking at an opening session of the NYC Media Lab Summit’s second day, Yang ranged widely over familiar policy issues such as the need for a “data dividend” for people whose personal information is used without compensation by tech firms, and how a California ballot measure this fall could encourage other states to impose similar laws on tech giants. He also said the pandemic lockdown built support for the concept of universal basic income.

Those are familiar topics for those who followed Yang’s unsuccessful but idea-filled run for the Democratic nomination, in which he proposed a string of reforms to government institutions and to rebalance

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The Cybersecurity 202: The Supreme Court could decide the fate of mail voting in two swing states

Pennsylvania Republicans, meanwhile, are already asking the U.S. Supreme Court to reverse a ruling by the state’s highest court that allows ballots to be counted if they arrive up to three days later. 

In both cases, the ballots must be postmarked by Election Day.

The two cases dramatically raise the chances the U.S. Supreme Court could determine the course of the election

If the Wisconsin decision stands, it could dramatically reduce the number of mail ballots that get counted in the state. 

U.S. District Judge William Conley originally ordered the six-day window for late-arriving ballots after a chaotic primary early in the pandemic.

During that April 7 primary, thousands of people didn’t receive requested mail ballots until shortly before Election Day and others didn’t receive them at all. The state decided to accept ballots postmarked by Election Day that arrived up to five days later. 

A whopping 79,000 ballots

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U.S. Supreme Court divided over Google’s bid to end Oracle’s Android copyright lawsuit

(Reuters) — The U.S. Supreme Court appeared divided on Wednesday as it considered whether to protect Alphabet’s Google from a long-running lawsuit by Oracle accusing it of infringing Oracle copyrights to build the Android operating system that runs most of the world’s smartphones.

The shorthanded court, down one justice following last month’s death of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, heard oral arguments in Google’s appeal of a lower court ruling reviving the lawsuit in which Oracle has sought at least $8 billion in damages.

Some of the eight justices expressed concern that Google simply copied Oracle’s software code instead of innovating and creating its own for mobile devices. Others emphasized that siding with Oracle could give software developers too much power with potentially harmful effects on the technology industry.

A jury cleared Google in 2016, but the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit overturned that decision in 2018,

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French court adds pressure on Google to pay for news

A Paris appeals court on Thursday upheld an order for Google to negotiate with media groups in a long-running dispute about revenues from online news.

The ruling came as the US internet giant announced it was close to a deal on compensating French media groups for news shown in Google search results.

Such a deal would represent a climbdown by Google, which has so far refused to comply with new EU rules giving more copyright protection to media firms for news displayed on search engines and social media.

France was the first European country to ratify the law, which could act as a lifeline to newspaper groups grappling with shrinking print sales.

In April, the French competition authority ordered Google to negotiate with the press in good faith — a ruling it appealed, accusing the authority of overstepping its jurisdiction.

The appeals court sided with the competition authority.

Google argues

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Supreme Court Weighs Copyright Fight Between Google and Oracle

The Supreme Court on Wednesday considered a multibillion-dollar copyright battle between

Oracle Corp.

and

Alphabet Inc.’s

Google, with justices appearing to look for a resolution that would retain legal protections for software code without throwing the tech industry into disarray.

During about 90 minutes of oral arguments, the justices considered issues related to how software developers use application-program interfaces, or APIs—prewritten packages of computer code that allow programs, websites or apps to talk to one another.

Oracle has accused Google of illegally copying more than 11,000 lines of Java API code to develop its Android operating system, which runs more than two billion mobile devices world-wide.

Google’s unlicensed use of that code is no better than “if someone wanted to write a book that reproduced the 11,000 best lines of ‘Seinfeld’,” Oracle lawyer Joshua Rosenkranz told the court.

Mr. Rosenkranz said

Microsoft Corp.

and

Apple Inc.

spent billions developing their

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Supreme Court Hears Copyright Battle Between Google and Oracle

WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court considered on Wednesday whether Google should have to pay Oracle billions of dollars in a long-running lawsuit over software used on many of the world’s smartphones, wrestling during a lively argument with the potentially enormous implications of what has been called the copyright case of the decade.

Several justices noted how consequential a decision in the case could be. “I’m concerned,” Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr. told a lawyer for Google, “that, under your argument, all computer code is at risk of losing protection.”

Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. noted the opposite concern. “We’re told that if we agree with Oracle, we will ruin our tech industry in the United States,” he said.

The justices heard the argument by telephone, and they used a series of low-tech analogies to test the two sides’ arguments. Their questions included ones on safecracking, football playbooks, typewriter keyboards,

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Today’s Supreme Court Hearing On A $9 Billion Case Involving Oracle And Google Could Reshape The Software Industry

In a landmark moment in the history of the U.S. software industry, the Supreme Court held a hearing today on a long-running legal dispute that pits tech giants Oracle and Google against one another.

The case centers around whether or not a key foundation of today’s increasingly software-driven economy—blocks of code known as “application programming interfaces”, or APIs—is subject to copyright protection. Oracle claims Google infringed copyright when it used elements of the Oracle-owned Java programming language to build its Android operating system, which now powers billions of smartphones and other devices. Google denies the claim, which involves about 11,500 lines of code out of millions of new lines that it wrote to create Android. The two companies have been battling one another in the courts for over a decade, with Oracle demanding $9 billion in compensation.

The outcome of this epic

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What Is Fair Use? Google vs. Oracle Brings Decade-Long Copyright Battle To Supreme Court

KEY POINTS

  • Oral arguments were held before the Supreme Court over the copyright case between Oracle and Google
  • Google stands to pay Oracle nearly $9 billion for 11,000 lines of code in Android software if the court rules in Oracle’s favor
  • Big tech is throwing in behind Google while media and entertainment companies and the Trump administration is backing Oracle

The Supreme Court faces upending the tech industry by determining whether Google stole code from Oracle in building its Android operating system in a case that could redefine the meaning of the fair use doctrine. All eight justices on Wednesday grilled the tech giants’ legal teams as well the U.S. deputy solicitor general in a potentially far-reaching case.

Google said its incorporation of 11,500 lines of Oracle Java code constitutes fair use, while Oracle argued the action violated its ownership rights. The lawsuit has been working its way through the

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Supreme Court wrestles with Google-Oracle copyright battle that could upend tech industry

WASHINGTON – The Supreme Court wrestled at length Wednesday over a $9 billion copyright battle between tech giants Google and Oracle that has gone on for a decade.

4 Big Tech CEOs draw scrutiny on Capitol Hill

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UP NEXT

But after an extended, 90-minute oral argument conducted by telephone in deference to the COVID-19 pandemic, several justices indicated their solution might be to send the case back to a lower court for even more review.

A majority of justices appeared to doubt that Google had the right to copy some of Oracle’s Java programming language to create Android, the world’s most popular mobile software. But they worried that a ruling against Google could set back software innovation by requiring costly duplication.



logo: The Supreme Court agreed to hear a multi-billion dollar copyright dispute between Google and Oracle.


© KAREN BLEIER, AFP/Getty Images
The Supreme Court agreed to hear a multi-billion dollar copyright dispute between Google and Oracle.

Start the day smarter. Get all

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