Stay-at-home orders cut noise exposure nearly in half — ScienceDaily

People’s exposure to environmental noise dropped nearly in half during the early months of the coronavirus pandemic, according to University of Michigan researchers who analyzed data from the Apple Hearing Study.

Researchers at U-M’s School of Public Health and Apple Inc. looked at noise exposure data from volunteer Apple Watch users in Florida, New York, California and Texas. The analysis, one of the largest to date, included more than a half million daily noise levels measured before and during the pandemic.

Daily average sound levels dropped approximately 3 decibels during the time that local governments made announcements about social distancing and issued stay-at-home orders in March and April, compared to January and February.

“That is a huge reduction in terms of exposure and it could have a great effect on people’s overall health outcomes over time,” said Rick Neitzel, associate professor of environmental health sciences at U-M’s School of Public

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Cisco, Arista Cut to Neutral On Concern About Network Demand

Cisco Systems  (CSCO) – Get Report and Arista Networks  (ANET) – Get Report were downgraded by Citigroup analyst Jim Suva, who sees the coronavirus pandemic continuing to blunt corporate demand for networks.

Cisco has networking systems for internet communications and internet technology, and Arista has cloud networking solutions.

Suva cut his share-price targets to $43 from $48 for Cisco and to $230 from $290 for Arista. 

Cisco, San Jose, Calif., recently traded at $40.31, up 1.2%. The stock has slumped 16% year to date. 

Arista recently traded at $226.29, down 0.6%. The stock has gained 11% year to date. The S&P 500 has climbed 10% year to date

“It is clear to us that business and life will not return to the pre covid-19 normal,” Suva wrote in a commentary.

“While we recognize there is likely a permanent shift to a more flexible work environment, we

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Will Tesla Continue To See Demand Or Is Another Price Cut On The Way?

Over the last year, Tesla (TSLA) has been on a fast ride. Its stock has soared more than 400% in 2020, and its delivery schedule has beaten the estimates of Wall Street. But some analysts are concerned that the electric carmaker may be running out of road.

In Q3 2020, Tesla delivered 139,300 vehicles, up from analyst expectations of 136,350, CNBC reported. While Tesla is on course to hit its goal of 500,000 vehicle deliveries for the year, some are wondering if demand for the electric cars will continue.

Joseph Spak, an analyst at RBC Capital, told Market Watch, “We do believe there could be some supply constraint, but bears may also point to some potential demand concerns. Some of the early data we’ve seen in Europe suggests sales may be softer than we expected, and we continue to believe Model 3 sales in the U.S. are down y/y [but

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American Express Shares Cut to Neutral on Valuation

American Express shares were cut to neutral from buy by Susquehanna analyst James Friedman, based on a full valuation at the credit card and travel services company.

His rating was at buy for at least three years, according to MarketWatch. Friedman affirmed his share-price target at $110.

“It would be hard for [the company] to do better than its merchants, so consensus 2021 revenue up 11% looks full to us,” Friedman wrote in a commentary, according to MarketWatch. He said 7.5% growth is more like it, according to The Fly.

AmEx shares recently traded at $105.31, down 0.7%. They had fallen 15% year to date through Thursday. They also have risen 11% since Sept. 24, including Friday’s move.

Morningstar analyst Eric Compton sees American Express close to his fair-value estimate of $108.

“Investors should expect a difficult year for AmEx, as the company battles the coronavirus pandemic,” he wrote in

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Jaguar Land Rover Reveals Headphone-Style Noise Cancelling Tech To Cut Driver Fatigue

Driver fatigue brought on by the monotonous drone of road roar and wind noise could soon be a thing of the past, as Jaguar Land Rover reveals new noise-cancelling technology.

Similar to how headphones with ANC (active noise cancelling) work, the new system uses sensors on each wheel to monitor vibrations. These are then used to produce a sound wave through the car’s audio system that cancels out the unwanted noise, particularly low-frequency sounds up to 300Hz.

The system debuts on the new Jaguar F-Pace, new Jaguar XE, and Range Rover Velar, but is likely to soon roll-out across the rest of the JLR range.

JLR explains how the system “calculates the opposite phase sound wave needed to remove the noise heard by the

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CU Anschutz campus to get new technology that can cut screening time for new drug therapies in half

AURORA, Colo. (KDVR) — The University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus in Aurora announced Tuesday the addition of new technology that researchers say could cut the screening time for new drug therapies in half.

Researchers say the new robotic screening and imaging technology could speed up the development of treatments for COVID, cancer or other diseases, while putting Colorado on the map in this field.

“Similar technologies exist on the coasts in academic institutions, but nothing in this region,” said Dr. David Ross, an associate dean at the CU Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences.

He and his colleagues say the machine can take a library with thousands of compounds and quickly screen them against targets in a disease.

“If the disease model took two weeks to screen, we can now screen it in a couple of days,” said Dr. Dan LaBarbera, a researcher who will be using the

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EU Seeks Authority to Cut Off Banks’ Tech Suppliers if Found Wanting on Cybersecurity

Banks and other financial institutions could be forced to cut ties with cloud providers and other technology suppliers under a draft European Union regulation that aims to limit cybersecurity risks to the sector.

National regulators in EU countries could require banks to stop using external technology services if their providers fail to fix cybersecurity problems identified in government inspections. The bill goes beyond existing European legislation mandating cybersecurity rules for the finance sector by requiring technology suppliers to also undergo regulatory scrutiny.

Under the proposed rules, authorities can recommend cybersecurity changes to technology providers, which must respond within 30 days on whether they plan to follow the recommendations. Regulators would then monitor whether financial firms have taken those risks into consideration, and can require them to suspend or stop using a company’s services.

“It could be a massive, massive headache,” said Richard Parlour, chief executive of law firm Financial Markets

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Google delays mandating Play Store’s 30% cut in India to April 2022

Google is postponing the enforcement of its new Play Store billing policy in India to April 2022, days after more than 150 startups in the world’s second largest internet market forged an informal coalition to express concerns over the 30% charge the Android-maker plans to mandate on its store and started to explore an alternative marketplace for their apps.

The company, which is going live globally with the new Play Store rule in September 2021, is deferring the enforcement of the policy only in India, it said. It is also listening to developers and willing to engage to allay their concerns, it said.

Last week, Google said it would no longer allow any apps to circumvent its payment system within the Play Store. The move, pitched by Google as a “clarification” of its existing policy, would allow the company to ensure it gets as high as a 30% cut on

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Google clamps down on apps dodging Play Store 30% cut

Google said Monday it plans to start enforcing a rule requiring Android apps in its Play store to use its payment system, which takes a 30 percent cut of transactions.

“We have clarified the language in our Payments Policy to be more explicit that all developers selling digital goods in their apps are required to use Google Play’s billing system,” product management vice president Sameer Samat said in a blog post.

People with smartphones or tablets powered by Google-backed Android software are free to get apps from online venues other than the Play Store run by the internet giant.

Google has always required apps offered on the Play Store’s virtual shelves to use its payment system, which takes an industry-standard 30 percent commission — the same as Apple does in its App Store for iOS-powered mobile devices.

Unlike Apple, however, Google has been lax about enforcing the rule.

Google said

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Google to Collect 30% Cut on In-App Purchases Starting in 2021

Taking a page out of Apple’s  (AAPL) – Get Report book, Google will begin more strictly enforcing rules that require developers to use Google’s  (GOOGL) – Get Report payment system for in-app purchases. 

Google announced the change on its Android developer blog on Monday, describing it as a clarification of Google’s existing rules on in-app purchases. Google had an existing policy requiring developers to use Google’s billing system, but the policy had been loosely enforced. 

“We’ve always required developers who distribute their apps on Play to use Google Play’s billing system if they offer in-app purchases of digital goods, and pay a service fee from a percentage of the purchase,” wrote Sameer Samat, VP of product management at Android. “We only collect a service fee if the developer charges users to download their app or they sell in-app digital items, and we think that is fair.

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