David Robertson, oft-quoted UMSL political science professor, dies at 69 | Obituaries

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David Robertson had planned to retire next year after spending nearly 40 years as a political science professor at the University of Missouri-St. Louis, but chose to retire in September so the university could honor the job offers it had made to two younger professors.

Even during pandemic budget squeezes, Dr. Robertson wanted to help.

“It spoke to Dave’s dedication to others,” said his longtime colleague Terry Jones, who said Dr. Robertson was always willing to guide co-workers and students. “He had

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Dave Robertson dies at age 69

Dave Robertson appeared on 5 On Your Side as a political analyst from 2000 to 2018

ST. LOUIS — A longtime 5 On Your Side political analyst and University of Missouri-St. Louis professor has died.

Dave Robertson, a Curators’ Distinguished Teaching Professor Emeritus in the Department of Political Science at the University of Missouri–St. Louis, died on Oct. 7, from complications of pancreatic cancer. He was 69 years old.

He was a nationally recognized scholar of American political development. Robertson appeared on 5 On Your Side as an analyst from 2000 to 2018.

Robertson was a beloved teacher throughout his 37 years at UMSL. A release from the university said he inspired thousands of undergraduates in the introductory American government course, fostered hundreds of baccalaureates in his advanced courses on environmental policy and federalism, and nurtured tens of doctoral students. Among his many career honors were the Governor’s Award for

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Woman Dies After Hair Gets Entangled In Go-Kart Wheels, Incident Caught On Camera

KEY POINTS

  • The 20-year-old woman succumbed to injuries from a go-karting incident
  • The woman’s parents have blamed the go-karting organizers’ negligence for the incident
  • Management claimed that it happened after she removed her helmet to click selfies

In an unfortunate incident, a 20-year-old woman died after her hair got entangled in a go-kart wheels in the southern Indian city of Hyderabad on Wednesday.

The woman, identified as Sri Varshini, had gone go-karting with her friends at an amusement park in the city when the incident took place. The woman, who was an engineering student, was rushed to a local hospital where she succumbed to injuries the following day.

Speaking to local website The News Minute Thursday, police officer Mahender Reddy said, “It was this morning that a written complaint was filed at the Meerpet police station. The woman was wearing a helmet but it seems like it came off midway

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Mario Molina, Nobel-winning Mexican chemist who made key climate change finding, dies at 77

MEXICO CITY (AP) — Mario Molina, winner of the Nobel Prize in chemistry in 1995 and the only Mexican scientist to be honored with a Nobel, died Wednesday in his native Mexico City. He was 77 years old.

Molina’s family announced his death in a brief statement through the institute that carried his name. It did not give a cause of death.

He won the prize along with scientists Frank Sherwood Rowland of the United States and Paul Crutzen of the Netherlands for their research into climate change.

Molina and Rowland published a paper in 1974 that saw the thinning of the ozone layer as a consequence of chlorofluorocarbons, or CFCs, chemicals used in a range of products.

Molina’s work contributed to the drafting of the first international treaty on the subject, the Montreal Protocol, which phased out the use of the chemicals. Later, he focused on confronting air pollution

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Mario Molina, Mexico chemistry Nobel winner, dies at 77

MEXICO CITY (AP) — Mario Molina, winner of the Nobel Prize in chemistry in 1995 and the only Mexican scientist to be honored with a Nobel, died Wednesday in his native Mexico City. He was 77 years old.

Molina’s faamily announced his death in a brief statement through the institute that carried his name. It did not give a cause of death.

He won the prize along with scientists Frank Sherwood Rowland of the United States and Paul Crutzen of the Netherlands for their research into climate change.

Molina and Rowland published a paper in 1974 that saw the thinning of the ozone layer as a consequence of chlorofluorocarbons, or CFCs, chemicals used in a range of products.


Molina’s work contributed to the drafting of the first international treaty on the subject, the Montreal Protocol, which phased out the use of the chemicals. Later, he focused on confronting air pollution

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Mexican Nobel Laureate Molina, Ozone Layer Prophet, Dies at 77 | World News

MEXICO CITY (Reuters) – Mexican scientist Mario Molina, who became his country’s first winner of the Nobel Prize for Chemistry for his work on the threat to the ozone layer from chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), has died at the age of 77, the government said on Wednesday.

One of Mexico’s most eminent scientists, Molina conducted some of his first experiments at a tender age in his childhood home before becoming a global authority on climate change.

The government and his former university announced Molina’s death, but the cause was not immediately clear.

Born in Mexico City, Molina was a graduate of the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) and took postgraduate degrees at universities in Germany and California.

In 2008, he was appointed a scientific adviser to U.S. President Barack Obama and also advised authorities in the Mexican capital on their efforts to reduce smog and air pollution, a chronic problem in

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Arthur Ashkin, 98, Dies; Nobel Laureate Invented a ‘Tractor Beam’

Arthur Ashkin, a physicist who was awarded a 2018 Nobel Prize for figuring out how to harness the power of light to trap microscopic objects for closer study, calling his invention optical tweezers, died on Sept. 21 at his home in Rumson, N.J. He was 98.

His daughter, Judith Herscu, confirmed the death on Monday.

Optical tweezers — or optical traps, as they are more properly known — use the pressure from a highly focused laser beam to manipulate microscopic objects, from atoms to living organisms, like viruses and bacteria.

As the Nobel committee wrote, Dr. Ashkin had “invented optical tweezers that grab particles, atoms, molecules, and living cells with their laser beam fingers.”

Trapping biological material proved to have groundbreaking practical applications in research and in understanding the behavior of the basic building blocks of life, like DNA, and other biological systems. Today, optical tweezers are widely manufactured and

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Ron Cobb, a Pioneer in Science Fiction Design, Dies at 83

Ron Cobb, the artist and movie production designer known for his work on the spaceship in “Alien,” the DeLorean in “Back to the Future,” and some tipsy aliens in “Star Wars,” died on Monday in Sydney, Australia.

He was 83. His death was confirmed by his wife, Robin Love. The cause was Lewy body dementia.

Mr. Cobb, a self-taught designer who worked largely behind the scenes, advanced an aesthetic that still influences the spaceships and time machines of today’s science fiction films: futuristic, yet retro; modular, but boundless; and bursting with meticulous detail.

“He was hugely influential to myself and many of my peers in the business,” said François Audouy, the production designer behind the 2019 movie “Ford v Ferrari” and the forthcoming “Ghostbusters: Afterlife.”

“His drawings were so infused with logic and realism,” Mr. Audouy said. “It just felt like his spaceships could take off at any moment.”

“Ron

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