12th District Court of Appeals says New Miami does not have to repay speeders $3.4 million

One of the speeders’ attorneys, Josh Engel, said they are considering an Ohio Supreme Court appeal.

“We are disappointed, especially since the court (and particularly Judge Piper) seemed to recognize the unfairness of a system designed primarily for profit, not safety,” Engel told the Journal-News.

Retired Butler County Judge Michael Sage deemed the program unlawful in March 2014 and Judge Michael Oster affirmed that ruling and ordered the village repay the tickets and around $400,000 in interest.

ExploreNew Miami: Village only owes speeders $10K, not $3.4M

New Miami’s outside counsel James Englert said he could not comment until he read the decision.

The speed cameras won’t begin rolling again any time soon however because the village is also locked in litigation with the state over punitive new laws that have curtailed their program. New Miami asked Common Pleas Judge Greg Howard to issue a temporary restraining order and injunction

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Wexford Science and Technology tapped as master developer for Midtown innovation district

JumpStart, which moved its offices to Midtown almost a decade ago, could become an anchor tenant in Wexford’s first building.

CEO Ray Leach described the innovation community in Cleveland as decentralized. With better cooperation in a district designed for interaction, he hopes barriers will fall for businesses, institutions and residents of majority Black, low-income neighborhoods on the city’s East Side.

“I’m envisioning hundreds of millions of dollars of more capital, tens of thousands of jobs, a real ability to make an impact around racial and economic inclusion,” Leach said. “I think this is the kind of project that has to happen in order for us to find new and different ways to collaborate.”

JumpStart is one of five organizations, along with the Cleveland Foundation, the Fund for Our Economic Future, the Greater Cleveland Partnership and Team NEO, steering a broader initiative called the Cleveland Innovation Project. That alliance is attempting

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Confidential information released after school district refused to pay hackers’ ransom demand, report says

Hackers may have gained access to confidential information about current and former staff and students of the fifth largest school district in the United States, according to a statement posted on the district’s website.



a school bus is parked on the side of a road: Hackers compromised confidential information from past and present staff and students of Clark County School District (CCSD), according to a statement posted on the school's website.


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Hackers compromised confidential information from past and present staff and students of Clark County School District (CCSD), according to a statement posted on the school’s website.

The Clark County School District (CCSD) in Las Vegas reopened for in-person learning on August 24. It was attacked by hackers three days later in an incident first reported by the Wall Street Journal.

On the morning of August 27, according to the statement, certain computer systems from CCSD became infected with a virus that prohibited access to certain files. The Wall Street Journal reports that hackers published documents containing Social Security numbers, student grades and other private information from CCSD students and staff after officials refused

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Nevada school district refuses to submit to ransomware blackmail, hacker publishes student data

A cybercriminal has published private data belonging to thousands of students following a failed attempt to exhort a ransomware payment from a Nevada school district.

Ransomware is a form of malware that can have a devastating impact on businesses and individuals alike. 

Once a ransomware package has landed and executed on a vulnerable system, files are usually encrypted, access to core systems and networks is revoked, and a landing page is thrown up demanding a payment — usually in cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin (BTC) or Monero (XMR) in return for a decryption key — which may or may not work.   

See also: Ransomware is your biggest problem on the web. This huge change could be the answer

Ransomware operators target organizations across every sector in the hopes that the fear of disrupting core operations will pressure victims into paying up. It may not be a valid legal expense, but for

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Depew School District using temperature wrist scanners to start new school year

The Depew Union Free School District has spent about $30,000 on new technology to detect whether anyone has a temperature.

DEPEW, N.Y. — Some local schools are already back in the classroom – others will return next week, and at one local district new technology is being used that’s intended to keep everyone safe.

The Depew Union Free School District will start the new year with Wrist temperature scanners at all their entrances. The wrist temperature scanners give you a reading in just five seconds.

“Every student, every employee has to pass by those scanners to get their temperature checked before they come in,” said Jeffrey Rabey, the Depew Schools superintendent. 

This on top of health screenings that should be done at home.

The district purchased 10 standing temperature scanners at a cost of nearly $30,000 using CARES Act funding, but according to the district superintendent, the manufacturer is backed

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