Trump administration targets diversity hiring by contractors

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FILE – In this March 10, 2020 file photo, Wells Fargo CEO and President Charles Scharf is seated to testify during a hearing of the House Financial Services Committee, on Capitol Hill in Washington. American companies promising to hire more Black employees in leadership roles and teach their workforce about racial bias are getting a message from President Donald Trump’s administration: Watch your step. Trump’s Labor Department is using a 55-year-old presidential order spurred by the Civil Rights Movement to scrutinize companies like Microsoft and Wells Fargo over their public commitments to boost Black employment and leadership roles.

AP

American companies promising to hire more Black employees in leadership roles and teach their workforce about racism are getting a message from President Donald Trump’s administration: Watch your step if you want to keep doing business with the federal government.

Trump’s Labor Department is using a 55-year-old presidential order

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U.S. government scrutinizes Microsoft’s hiring practices as tech giant looks to boost diversity

Microsoft’s headquarters in Redmond, Wash. (GeekWire Photo / Monica Nickelsburg)

Microsoft in June announced a sweeping racial justice plan, including an initiative to spend $150 million on diversity and inclusion programs, and double its number of Black and African American managers and senior employees by 2025 in the U.S.

Now the United States Department of Labor Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP) is taking a closer look at the company’s hiring and whether it constitutes unlawful discrimination on the basis of race.

“We have every confidence that Microsoft’s diversity initiative complies fully with all U.S. employment laws,” Dev Stahlkopf, corporate vice president and general counsel at Microsoft, wrote in a blog post published Tuesday. “We look forward to providing the OFCCP with this information and, if necessary, defending our approach.”

The OFCCP asks Microsoft to “prove that the actions we are taking to improve opportunities are not illegal race-based

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Increasing Diversity in Academia is Aim of New Alliance with National Science Foundation

AUSTIN, Texas – The University of Texas at Austin is participating in a 3½-year collaborative project with top research universities to increase the number of underrepresented minority faculty members in mathematics, physical and earth sciences, and engineering (MPESE) fields at research universities.

The project has been selected to become one of the Alliances for Graduate Education and the Professoriate (AGEP), funded by the National Science Foundation. The alliance will provide underrepresented minority doctoral and postdoctoral students training opportunities to learn and network at partner institutions, conduct research exchange visits and develop resources for placement, hiring and advancement of these students into faculty positions. Underrepresented minority students include African Americans, Chicanos/Latinos, Native Americans/Alaskan Natives and Pacific Islanders.

UT Austin will partner with the University of California Berkeley, the University of California Los Angeles, Stanford University, the California Institute of Technology, the University of Washington, the University of Michigan, Harvard University and

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How This Celebrity Realtor Is Making Diversity And Inclusion His Top Listing

As the drive increases for society to become more inclusive, and provide sustainable and equitable support for Black communities, the real estate sector has come into the spotlight for lack of racial representation.

To date, Rod Watson, founder of The Watson Group LAVIPagent team, and Director of Sports and Entertainment at Keller Williams Beverly Hills, has sold and negotiated over $120 million in real estate during his 14 year career. He says, “I’ve learned a lot of valuable information when it comes to real estate investing. My focus has been to help as many athletes and people of color as I can to generate, and maintain generational wealth through real estate investing. That is my purpose and reason for being in this business.” 

His journey began with a dream to get

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Diversity training startup lost a client to Trump’s ban, CEO says

  • Paradigm CEO Joelle Emerson said in a tweet Thursday that a recent executive order from the Trump administration banning certain types of diversity training at federal contractors already caused her to lose a a client.
  • Emerson said the type of training her startup provides does not violate the executive order, but that this company ended it just to “play it safe.”
  • She said that other companies are holding off on diversity training altogether because of confusion over the order.
  • Paradigm is especially known for providing training to Silicon Valley startups and big tech firms, which have historically struggled to achieve representation of minorities in their workforces and C-suites.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The CEO of a diversity training consulting firm said Thursday that her company has already lost a client due to President Trump’s recent executive order.

 

“We just lost our

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Experian North America Expands Commitment to Culture of Inclusion With First Chief Diversity, Inclusion & Belonging Officer

Wil Lewis brings decades of diversity and inclusion expertise and leadership

Expanding on Experian North America’s commitment to a culture of diversity and inclusion, the company announced today Wil Lewis will join the organization as its first-ever Chief Diversity, Inclusion and Belonging Officer. In this role, Lewis will build upon Experian North America’s award winning programs to reflect the employees, clients and communities it serves, further the company’s commitment to diverse representation and continuously evolve the workplace culture where all employees are celebrated for bringing their whole selves to work. He most recently served as Senior Vice President, Global Diversity and Inclusion Executive for Bank of America.

“Embracing a truly inclusive culture, where everyone feels a real sense of belonging, is critical to building a diverse workforce and fostering innovation,” said Experian North America CEO Craig Boundy. “Our diversity and inclusion efforts have always focused on how we can contribute

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California Ushers In A Bold New Era Of Board Diversity

Efforts to secure diversity on corporate boards have reached a new level of intensity. Governor Gavin Newsom of California signed a statute into law on Wednesday, September 30, which will require publicly held corporations whose principal executive offices are located in California to satisfy mandated levels of racially, ethnically and other diverse directors beginning in 2021.

By emphasizing the interests of “underrepresented communities,” the new legislation promises to significantly increase the level of boardroom engagement on matters of leadership diversity. In so doing, it serves to broaden existing concepts of diversity to include specific ethnic groups and matters of sexual orientation. It is also a dramatic supplement to 2018 California legislation that required public companies headquartered in the state to assure the appointment of specified numbers of women to the board of directors—a groundbreaking development

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Leveraging Data And Covid-19 To End Diversity Gaps In Tech Events

As Black Lives Matter earns the “biggest movement in U.S. history” ribbon, progress in gender equality is losing steam after decades of improvement.

For many technology events, legacy barriers evaporated given the shift to strictly-remote conferences and interactive webcasts. The question begs, ‘Is open access enough?’ Today’s virtual reality is an ideal time for research on, reflection in and planning for a more equitable future for women’s presence in tech events.

What the data tells us

Ensono – a hybrid IT services provider – recently released Speak Up 2020: Redesigning Tech Conferences With Women In Mind. In this year’s report, Ensono not only refreshed their previous survey by sharing women’s responses when asked about their tech conference experiences, but chose to dig a bit deeper on diversity and the role of unconscious bias in conference planning.

What we find out via the

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The Nobel Prizes Have a Diversity Problem Worse Than the Scientific Fields They Honor | Best Countries

In 2007, I served as a consultant for the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences’ deliberations about the Nobel Prize in Chemistry. As a result, I was invited to attend the Nobel ceremonies. Staying at the Grand Hotel with all the awardees, I got to see how scientists – excellent but largely unknown outside their fields – suddenly became superstars.

As soon as they’re announced annually in early October, Nobel laureates become role models who are invited to give seminars all around the world. In Stockholm for the awards, these scientists were interviewed on radio and television and hobnobbed with Swedish royalty. Swedish television aired the events of Nobel week live.

As a chemist who has also investigated how science is done, seeing scientists and their research jump to the top of the public’s consciousness thanks to all the Nobel hoopla is gratifying. But in the 119 years since the Nobel

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Science grants aim to expand diversity in UA programs

story.lead_photo.captionKassandra Salazar (left), a sophomore at the University of Arkansas from Rogers, speaks Tuesday, April 5, 2016, to a group of 11th-grade students from Heritage High School in Rogers as they walk past Old Main while on a tour of the university campus in Fayetteville.
(
NWA Democrat-Gazette file photo /
Andy Shupe
)

FAYETTEVILLE — Three separate grants of about $1 million from the National Science Foundation aim to increase diversity in science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields at the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville.

The university plans to recruit a cohort of 12 doctoral students from underrepresented racial and ethnic groups with help from a Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation grant award, said Jorge Almodovar, an assistant professor of chemical engineering at UA and site director for the project. Each student will receive a stipend of $32,000 and additional support.

“The heart of this project is not only

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