Why the Army Is Doubling Down on Drones to Win Future Wars

The Army’s use of manned-unmanned teaming, wherein human operators control air and ground robotic vehicles to conduct reconnaissance, carry supplies or even launch attacks has long been underway. This developmental trajectory is demonstrated by the Army’s most recent successes with unmanned-unmanned teaming. 

Progress with drone to drone connectivity, from ground to ground and ground to air is fast gaining momentum following successful recent experiments where the Army passed key targeting data from larger drones to smaller mini-drones in the air. This happened in September at Yuma Proving Grounds, Ariz., during the Army’s Project Convergence experiment, wherein the ability to massively shorten sensor-to-shooter time and network time-sensitive combat information was demonstrated between drones. 

During the experiment, an Army Gray Eagle drone networked with a forward operating mini-drone called Air Launched Effects. This, as Army leaders described, extended the range, scope and target envelope for attack missions well beyond “line of sight”

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The FAA is opening the door a crack for self-flying drones like Skydio to reach their potential

You can’t fly a drone at night. You can’t fly a drone over people. You need to be able to see it with your naked eye at all times — or have a dedicated observer who can. These rules exist to keep dumb drones (and reckless pilots) from crashing into people, property, and other aircraft in the skies.

But what happens when drones get smarter, and can dodge obstacles on their own? That’s the kind of drone that Skydio builds, and it appears to be successfully convincing the FAA to create exceptions to that naked-eye, Visual Line Of Sight (VLOS) rule.

This week, the FAA granted the North Carolina Department of Transportation (NCDOT) a blanket waiver to fly Skydio drones beyond visual line of sight (BVLOS) to inspect any bridge, anywhere across the state, for four whole years. They primarily need to make sure the bridge isn’t occupied by random

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Turkey’s Drones Are Coming In All Sizes These Days

Turkey is developing an increasing variety of lethal armed drones that range from large high-flying bomb-laden ones to very small, low-flying ones that can form deadly swarms.

In recent years, Turkey has developed an impressive local drone industry from the ground up. Armed Turkish-built Bayraktar TB2 and Anka-S drones have already proven themselves in combat in operations in Syria, Iraq, and even as far afield as Libya.

Ankara is presently building a variety of bigger and smaller drones that will fulfill a multitude of different roles for the Turkish military. 

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Falcons will use high-tech drones to clean Mercedes-Benz Stadium once fans return

MLS: Sporting Kansas City at Atlanta United FC
USATSI

The 0-3 Atlanta Falcons’ second-half play this season has been anything but clean, but now with the help of some high-tech drones, at least their stadium will be spotless. The team and Mercedes-Benz Stadium have partnered with Charlotte-based Lucid Drone Technologies for D1 disinfecting drones to sanitize the stadium. They will use two drones to sanitize the 71,000-seat area, with a third on deck if needed.

To get everything in the space clean, the drones use electrostatic spraying nozzles that allows for “medical-grade disinfecting chemicals” to be spread in the stadium, according to ESPN. The move to use these drones comes as the team plans to welcome back fans at a limited capacity in October, starting on the 11th when they host the Carolina Panthers.

“This stadium is incredibly large, and as we begin to slowly welcome fans back, these drones allow us to maximize the time between games

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NFL teams turn to technology, plan to clean stadiums with drones and robots

NFL teams plan to clean stadiums with drones and robots originally appeared on NBC Sports Washington

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic and the desire to allow fans into their stadium in a limited capacity, the Atlanta Falcons plan to use drones to clean Mercedes-Benz Stadium after each home game for the remainder of the season.

The 71,000-seat stadium has partnered with Lucid Drone Technologies for the use of disinfecting drones to sanitize using electrostatic spraying nozzles that will evenly distribute medical-grade disinfecting chemicals that help fight the virus.

After barring fans from the stadium for their first two home games, the Falcons plan on opening their doors in a limited capacity starting on Oct. 11 against the Panthers. According to Lucid Drone Technologies, one disinfecting drone is the equivalent of 14 workers with backpack sprayers, a 95 percent reduction in time spent cleaning.

“The process of welcoming fans back

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Atlanta Falcons to use drones to clean stadium after games

The Atlanta Falcons’ home, Mercedes-Benz Stadium, is believed to be the first professional sports venue to implement drones to clean the stadium, but they’re not the only ones using new technology.

Beginning after the team’s Oct. 11 game against the Carolina Panthers, the 71,000-seat stadium, which has not hosted fans for the first two home games because of the coronavirus pandemic, will welcome back a limited capacity. (The stadium hosted about 500 family members, friends and associates for a test run during Sunday’s Bears-Falcons game.)

Mercedes-Benz Stadium partnered with Charlotte-based Lucid Drone Technologies for D1 disinfecting drones to sanitize areas. The drones use electrostatic spraying nozzles for even distribution of medical-grade disinfecting chemicals that include an inhibitor that prevents bacteria and virus from adhering to surfaces without leaving a residue. The nontoxic hypochlorous acid solution is in compliance with Environmental Protection Agency standards, according to the company.

Two drones will

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Using Drones to Rescue Wildlife From Climate Disasters

Douglas Thron travels to fire-ravaged forests and towns struck by hurricanes to save animals among the rubble.

▲ A dog left stranded among the ruins of Hurricane Dorian in the Bahamas in 2019.

Source: Courtesy Douglas Thron

Scientists have long deployed drones to do everything from counting caribou to collecting whale snot. Now the flying machines are helping to rescue animals as climate change takes an increasingly deadly toll on wildlife.  

For the past year, a California videographer named Douglas Thron has chased climate catastrophes around the world, piloting drones outfitted with infrared cameras and spotlights to help find survivors of hurricanes and firestorms whose frequency and intensity are growing with rising temperatures. After Thron locates the animals, wildlife rescuers can move them to safety.

“The potential for these drones to save animals, whether wild or domestic, and

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Optus and ANU to throw satellites, drones, and robotics at Australian bushfires

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The Australian bushfires wreaked havoc. A new study shows that anthropogenic climate change made things worse.


Image: World Weather Attribution

The Australian National University (ANU) and Optus announced on Thursday the pair would attempt to develop a national system to detect and extinguish fires using a mixture of satellites, drones, and robotics.

The first step of the program, which is due to run until 2024, will be to create an “autonomous ground-based and aerial fire detection system”.

It will begin with the trial of long-range infra-red sensor cameras placed on towers in fire-prone areas in the ACT, which will allow the ACT Rural Fire Service (RFS) to monitor and identify bushfires.

The long-term goal, though, is to put out fires using drones.

“We hope to develop a system that can locate a fire within the first few minutes of ignition and extinguish it soon afterwards,” ANU vice-chancellor Professor Brian Schmidt

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Landmark waiver lets drones fly into fire

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A landmark emergency waiver granted by the FAA has allowed Verizon to deploy industrial drones to inspect their critical infrastructure during the US wildfires, ensuring first responders have reliable communications for disaster response. The drones are made by a company called Percepto, which are currently operating beyond-line-of-sight for this emergency deployment.

The FAA granted Skyward, A Verizon company, a temporary waiver that allows company pilots to fly the Percepto Sparrow drone from their homes to inspect critical communications infrastructure near the Big Hollow wildfire in Washington. The waiver permits operations 24 hours a day, with less than 3 miles of visibility and no pilot or observer on site. This is the first time a Beyond the Visual Line Of Sight waiver has been granted that allows pilots to control the drone from home. 

The Sparrow drone platform is already able to land in high winds and in snow. Percepto recently

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Using drones to better predict urban flooding

Using drones to better predict urban flooding
Credit: University of Luxembourg

The University of Luxembourg and the start-up RSS-Hydro are working together to optimize the prediction of flooding in Burange in the south of Luxembourg. Supported by the City of Dudelange, the project aims at building a unique and precise urban terrain model with the help of drones, aerial and satellite images to feed state-of-the art flood models.


Floods in cities: Rising impact

This phenomenon is observed with increasing frequency and intensity and is probably linked to climate change. “Floods and especially flash floods in urban areas are some of the main natural hazards in Europe and worldwide that are fuelled by shorter and more severe weather events amidst otherwise prolonged dry periods,” says Professor Norman Teferle who leads the Geodesy and Geospatial Engineering group at the University of Luxembourg.

In their paper, “Towards a high-resolution drone-based 3-D mapping dataset to optimize flood hazard modeling,” the team

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