PwC: Blockchain technologies could boost the global economy US$1.76 trillion by 2030 through raising levels of tracking, tracing and trust

LONDON, Oct. 13, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — New analysis by PwC shows Blockchain technology has the potential to boost global gross domestic product (GDP) by US$1.76 trillion over the next decade.  

 

 

That is the key finding of a new PwC report Time for trust: The trillion-dollar reason to rethink blockchain,  assessing how the technology is being currently used and exploring the impact blockchain could have on the global economy. Through analysis of the top five uses of blockchain, ranked by their potential to generate economic value, the report gauges the technology’s potential to create value across industry, from healthcare, government and public services, to manufacturing, finance, logistics and retail.

“Blockchain technology has long been associated with cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin, but there is so much more that it has to offer, particularly in how public and private organisations secure, share and use data,” comments Steve Davies, Global Leader,

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A circular economy could save the world’s economy post-COVID-19 — ScienceDaily

The Covid-19 pandemic has challenged all facets of human endeavours, and seven months later the economic effects are particularly being felt

How the world can leverage the positive and negative effects of COVID-19 to build a new, more resilient and low-carbon economy has been analysed by a group of academics led by WMG, University of Warwick

A more sustainable model based on circular economy framework could help the world recover financially from COVID-19, whilst facilitating the attainment of net zero carbon goals

The World’s economy is feeling the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic with many industries under threat. A group of researchers from the UK, Malaysia, Nigeria, UAE and Japan, led by WMG, University of Warwick have concluded that adopting circular economy strategies would be the best way for the world’s economy to recover, whilst enabling the transition to a low-carbon economy.Dr Taofeeq Ibn-Mohammed

The World Health Organisation declared the

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It’s High Time We Got a ‘F**k Off’ Economy: Zephyr Teachout

In the 1980s, under the Reagan administration’s lax enforcement of antitrust laws, corporate mergers in the U.S. began to jump. Since then, the market power of America’s biggest corporations has only continued to increase, with this result: A tiny number of companies dominate slews of major industries—from pharmaceuticals and retailers to hospitals and meat processors to defense contractors and social media, to many, many others. This issue was thrown into stark relief during the pandemic when behemoths such as Amazon, Google, Facebook, and Walmart saw their market values skyrocket while smaller companies all over the country went bankrupt.

Zephyr Teachout contends that monopoly is the forgotten issue of our time.

Monopoly, argues the law professor and former New York congressional and gubernatorial candidate, is a key driver of modern society’s biggest problems, such as low wages, income inequality, financial speculation, restrictions to worker freedom, declining entrepreneurship, and racism.

With her

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WHY IS THE MARKET SO STRONG & ECONOMY SO WEAK

The continuing strength of the stock market, even as the coronavirus pandemic batters the U.S. economy, has baffled many investors. The Dow Jones Industrial Index fell some 35% in 20 trading days the first three weeks of March as COVID-19 began spreading rapidly globally, but it has since gained nearly 60% to levels above 28,650. At the same time, the Commerce Department reported the U.S. economy shrank 31.7% in the April-June quarter. Part of our job at Equitas is to research many areas of the market and the economy, analyze the current environment, and to search for the investment opportunities. While there are numerous views and theories, in this KnowRisk Report we explore and expand on why the stock market is so strong, while the economy is so weak. We start with Wharton finance professor Itay Goldstein who has boiled it down into two reasons: the long-term prospective of the

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Trump’s stimulus bill bombshell puts new pressure on an ailing economy. Here’s the latest

President Donald Trump’s call for an end to stimulus negotiations on a new stimulus bill presented a new wrinkle in the story of the country’s economic recovery from the deep financial fissures of the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. His tweet a few hours later urged Congress to pass several of the stimulus measures that had been part of those very discussions. Neither political analysts nor many of the millions who’ve suffered financial calamity on account of the pandemic seem to know what to make of the president’s messaging.



a pair of scissors: Americans are cutting back on spending as they plan for a recession that might not end until the coronavirus pandemic is over. Angela Lang/CNET


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Americans are cutting back on spending as they plan for a recession that might not end until the coronavirus pandemic is over. Angela Lang/CNET



a pair of scissors


© Angela Lang/CNET


The stimulus package that had been under negotiation was expected to include a second stimulus check and renewed enhanced unemployment benefits. Without it, many of those hit hardest by the

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CRISPRing trees for a climate-friendly economy

poplar tree
Credit: Pixabay/CC0 Public Domain

Researchers led by prof. Wout Boerjan (VIB-UGent Center for Plant Systems Biology) have discovered a way to stably finetune the amount of lignin in poplar by applying CRISPR/Cas9 technology. Lignin is one of the main structural substances in plants and it makes processing wood into, for example, paper difficult. This study is an important breakthrough in the development of wood resources for the production of paper with a lower carbon footprint, biofuels, and other bio-based materials. Their work, in collaboration with VIVES University College (Roeselare, Belgium) and University of Wisconsin (U.S.) appears in Nature Communications.


Today’s fossil-based economy results in a net increase of CO2 in the Earth’s atmosphere and is a major cause of global climate change. To counter this, a shift toward a circular and bio-based economy is essential. Woody biomass can play a crucial role in such a bio-based economy by

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Business leaders call for urgent reforms as global economy faces its ‘worst state in a century’

  • On Monday, business leaders under the Business Twenty group made 22 policy recommendations for the G-20 group.
  • Each recommendation fell into three key areas: empowering people, safeguarding the planet and shaping new frontiers.



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Top business leaders say the global economy is facing its worst crisis in a hundred years, and “downside risks remain elevated” unless urgent reforms are enacted during the G-20 summit hosted by Saudi Arabia in November.

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“The global economy is in its worst state in a century,” warned Yousef Al-Benyan, chairman of Business Twenty (B20), a group made up of high-level CEOs from around the world. “The challenging opportunity is to build back better, with real urgency required from policymakers and business leaders,” he added.

Business Twenty is an engagement group that seeks to represent the voice of the global business community across all member states and economic sectors in

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‘Graphene ecosystem will help drive regional economy’

A Greater Manchester MP and science advisor has praised a new approach to innovation based around the commercialisation of graphene, citing its aim of supporting investment and new opportunities in the region.

Mark Logan, MP for Bolton North East and a member of the Parliamentary Science and Technology Committee, was shown facilities at the Graphene Engineering Innovation Centre (GEIC), including specialist labs and the ‘high bay’ area, which are home to highly specialised equipment used in the testing and scale-up of products using graphene and other 2D materials.

Mark (pictured right) was the first VIP visitor to take a virtual tour of a graphene facility at The University of Manchester following lockdown.

The tour was led by James Baker, CEO of Graphene@Manchester, using a digital 360 video (filmed pre-Covid) to ensure compliance with current health protocols and safeguard workers on site.

“It was really helpful to be

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Estee Lauder Is First Beauty Brand To Go Into Space In NASA’s Push For Space Economy

KEY POINTS

  • Advanced Night Repair products will be photographed with the view of the space
  • Estee Lauder will auction one bottle for charity when products are sent back to Earth
  • The initiative is part of NASA’s plan to develop low-Earth orbit for commercial gains

Estee Lauder will have the claim of becoming the first-ever beauty brand to go into space as part of NASA’s push for commercializing low-Earth orbit explorations. The luxury brand will send 10 bottles of its Advanced Night Repair Synchronized Multi-Recovery Complex brand to space aboard a Cygnus spacecraft.

The Cygnus spacecraft is scheduled to launch atop an Antares rocket from Northrop Grumman’s 14th commercial resupply services. According to the press release posted on the company website, the breakthrough launch is set to happen on Sept. 29, 2020. The bottles will arrive at the International Space Station on Oct. 3, 2020.  

“NASA is at the forefront of

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No on Prop. 22. It’s the wrong solution for Uber drivers and the gig economy

Passengers connect with drivers at the ride-hailing lot at LAX on Aug. 20. <span class="copyright">(Los Angeles Times)</span>
Passengers connect with drivers at the ride-hailing lot at LAX on Aug. 20. (Los Angeles Times)

Proposition 22, which would classify drivers for app-based services such as Uber and Lyft as independent contractors but guarantee them certain benefits, is an ink-blot test.

If you think these companies are predators that exploit workers and compete unfairly, you’ll see the measure as yet another effort by the tech industry to circumvent the rules by which responsible corporate citizens play. If you think the apps provide workers an easy means to make extra money and consumers an affordable alternative to taxis, you’ll see Proposition 22 as a way to hold onto a service you value.

In reality, the measure is a fix designed by Uber and its counterparts for a problem the California Supreme Court created when it issued its Dynamex decision in 2018, making it harder for employers to classify workers as

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